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Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis

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41. Molluscum Contagiosum (Treatment)

that subcutaneous interferon-alfa administered intralesionally may be useful in immunocompromised children. A case report noted the efficacy of topical cidofovir in the treatment of disseminated molluscum in immunodepressed patients. [ ] Cidofovir diphosphate was reported to inhibit molluscum contagiosum virus DNA polymerase activity. [ ] Imiquimod cream is an immune response modifier approved for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts in adults. In the past, it was used in molluscum contagiosum (...) of streptococcal antigen [ ] have been shown to be effective in treating patients with resistant molluscum contagiosum. The high cost of these products limits their use to more extensive or resistant infections. The dosing schedule and length of treatment require further evaluation. A newer compound, Veregen, is a sinecatechin. Its true mechanism of action is unknown. It is a botanical extract from green tea. The 15% ointment is applied topically 3 times a day. It is FDA approved for topical therapy

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

42. Molluscum Contagiosum (Treatment)

that subcutaneous interferon-alfa administered intralesionally may be useful in immunocompromised children. A case report noted the efficacy of topical cidofovir in the treatment of disseminated molluscum in immunodepressed patients. [ ] Cidofovir diphosphate was reported to inhibit molluscum contagiosum virus DNA polymerase activity. [ ] Imiquimod cream is an immune response modifier approved for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts in adults. In the past, it was used in molluscum contagiosum (...) of streptococcal antigen [ ] have been shown to be effective in treating patients with resistant molluscum contagiosum. The high cost of these products limits their use to more extensive or resistant infections. The dosing schedule and length of treatment require further evaluation. A newer compound, Veregen, is a sinecatechin. Its true mechanism of action is unknown. It is a botanical extract from green tea. The 15% ointment is applied topically 3 times a day. It is FDA approved for topical therapy

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

43. Impetigo (Overview)

form. [ ] It tends to affect the face, extremities, axillae, trunk, and perianal region of neonates, but older children and adults can also be infected. [ ] The initial lesions are fragile thin-roofed, flaccid, and transparent bullae (< 3 cm) with a clear, yellow fluid that turns cloudy and dark yellow. Once the bullae rupture, they leave behind a rim of scale around an erythematous moist base but no crust, followed by a brown-lacquered or scalded-skin appearance, with a collarette of scale (...) , is the most common skin infection in children, accounting for approximately 10% of all cutaneous problems in pediatric clinics. It is more contagious than the bullous type. [ ] Common impetigo is the term applied when the infection occurs in preexisting wounds. Impetigo as a secondary infection of preexisting skin disease or traumatized skin has also been referred to as impetiginous dermatitis. Nonbullous impetigo is caused by , (GABHS, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes ), or a combination of both

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

44. Psoriasis, Guttate (Diagnosis)

common in individuals younger than 30 years. An upper respiratory tract infection from group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (eg, Streptococcus pyogenes ) often precedes the eruption by 2-3 weeks. [ ] Streptococcal perianal dermatitis, a superficial bacterial infection of the anus and perianal skin in children, has also been linked with the appearance of guttate psoriasis. [ , ] Although episodes may recur, especially those due to pharyngeal carriage of streptococci, isolated bouts have commonly been (...) A, Kayam N, Sela S, Fry L, Baker B, et al. An investigation of antistreptococcal antibody responses in guttate psoriasis. Arch Dermatol Res . 2008 Sep. 300(8):441-9. . Ulger Z, Gelenava T, Kosay Y, Darcan S. Acute guttate psoriasis associated with streptococcal perianal dermatitis. Clin Pediatr (Phila) . 2007 Jan. 46(1):70-2. . Ledoux M, Chazerain V, Saiag P, Mahe E. [Streptococcal perianal dermatitis and guttate psoriasis]. Ann Dermatol Venereol . 2009 Jan. 136(1):37-41. . Shin MS, Kim SJ, Kim SH

2014 eMedicine.com

45. Impetigo (Diagnosis)

form. [ ] It tends to affect the face, extremities, axillae, trunk, and perianal region of neonates, but older children and adults can also be infected. [ ] The initial lesions are fragile thin-roofed, flaccid, and transparent bullae (< 3 cm) with a clear, yellow fluid that turns cloudy and dark yellow. Once the bullae rupture, they leave behind a rim of scale around an erythematous moist base but no crust, followed by a brown-lacquered or scalded-skin appearance, with a collarette of scale (...) , is the most common skin infection in children, accounting for approximately 10% of all cutaneous problems in pediatric clinics. It is more contagious than the bullous type. [ ] Common impetigo is the term applied when the infection occurs in preexisting wounds. Impetigo as a secondary infection of preexisting skin disease or traumatized skin has also been referred to as impetiginous dermatitis. Nonbullous impetigo is caused by , (GABHS, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes ), or a combination of both

2014 eMedicine.com

46. Impetigo (Diagnosis)

form. [ ] It tends to affect the face, extremities, axillae, trunk, and perianal region of neonates, but older children and adults can also be infected. [ ] The initial lesions are fragile thin-roofed, flaccid, and transparent bullae (< 3 cm) with a clear, yellow fluid that turns cloudy and dark yellow. Once the bullae rupture, they leave behind a rim of scale around an erythematous moist base but no crust, followed by a brown-lacquered or scalded-skin appearance, with a collarette of scale (...) , is the most common skin infection in children, accounting for approximately 10% of all cutaneous problems in pediatric clinics. It is more contagious than the bullous type. [ ] Common impetigo is the term applied when the infection occurs in preexisting wounds. Impetigo as a secondary infection of preexisting skin disease or traumatized skin has also been referred to as impetiginous dermatitis. Nonbullous impetigo is caused by , (GABHS, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes ), or a combination of both

2014 eMedicine.com

47. Molluscum Contagiosum (Follow-up)

that subcutaneous interferon-alfa administered intralesionally may be useful in immunocompromised children. A case report noted the efficacy of topical cidofovir in the treatment of disseminated molluscum in immunodepressed patients. [ ] Cidofovir diphosphate was reported to inhibit molluscum contagiosum virus DNA polymerase activity. [ ] Imiquimod cream is an immune response modifier approved for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts in adults. In the past, it was used in molluscum contagiosum (...) of streptococcal antigen [ ] have been shown to be effective in treating patients with resistant molluscum contagiosum. The high cost of these products limits their use to more extensive or resistant infections. The dosing schedule and length of treatment require further evaluation. A newer compound, Veregen, is a sinecatechin. Its true mechanism of action is unknown. It is a botanical extract from green tea. The 15% ointment is applied topically 3 times a day. It is FDA approved for topical therapy

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

48. Impetigo (Diagnosis)

form. [ ] It tends to affect the face, extremities, axillae, trunk, and perianal region of neonates, but older children and adults can also be infected. [ ] The initial lesions are fragile thin-roofed, flaccid, and transparent bullae (< 3 cm) with a clear, yellow fluid that turns cloudy and dark yellow. Once the bullae rupture, they leave behind a rim of scale around an erythematous moist base but no crust, followed by a brown-lacquered or scalded-skin appearance, with a collarette of scale (...) , is the most common skin infection in children, accounting for approximately 10% of all cutaneous problems in pediatric clinics. It is more contagious than the bullous type. [ ] Common impetigo is the term applied when the infection occurs in preexisting wounds. Impetigo as a secondary infection of preexisting skin disease or traumatized skin has also been referred to as impetiginous dermatitis. Nonbullous impetigo is caused by , (GABHS, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes ), or a combination of both

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

49. Fournier Gangrene (Diagnosis)

, is defined as a polymicrobial of the perineal, perianal, or genital areas (see the image below.) In contrast to Fournier's initial description, the disease is not limited to young people or to males, and a cause is now usually identified. [ ] Photomicrograph of Fournier gangrene (necrotizing fasciitis), oil immersion at 1000X magnification. Note the acute inflammatory cells in the necrotic tissue. Bacteria are located in the haziness of their cytoplasm. Courtesy of Billie Fife, MD, and Thomas A. Santora (...) multiplication. [ ] Although Meleney in 1924 attributed the necrotizing infections to streptococcal species only, [ ] subsequent clinical series have emphasized the multiorganism nature of most cases of necrotizing infection, including Fournier gangrene. [ , , , , ] Presently, recovering only streptococcal species is unusual. [ ] Rather, streptococcal organisms are cultured along with as many as 5 other organisms. The following are common causative microorganisms: Streptococcal species Staphylococcal species

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

50. Fournier Gangrene (Overview)

as a polymicrobial of the perineal, perianal, or genital areas (see the image below.) In contrast to Fournier's initial description, the disease is not limited to young people or to males, and a cause is now usually identified. [ ] Photomicrograph of Fournier gangrene (necrotizing fasciitis), oil immersion at 1000X magnification. Note the acute inflammatory cells in the necrotic tissue. Bacteria are located in the haziness of their cytoplasm. Courtesy of Billie Fife, MD, and Thomas A. Santora, MD. Impaired (...) . [ ] Although Meleney in 1924 attributed the necrotizing infections to streptococcal species only, [ ] subsequent clinical series have emphasized the multiorganism nature of most cases of necrotizing infection, including Fournier gangrene. [ , , , , ] Presently, recovering only streptococcal species is unusual. [ ] Rather, streptococcal organisms are cultured along with as many as 5 other organisms. The following are common causative microorganisms: Streptococcal species Staphylococcal species

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

51. Molluscum Contagiosum (Follow-up)

that subcutaneous interferon-alfa administered intralesionally may be useful in immunocompromised children. A case report noted the efficacy of topical cidofovir in the treatment of disseminated molluscum in immunodepressed patients. [ ] Cidofovir diphosphate was reported to inhibit molluscum contagiosum virus DNA polymerase activity. [ ] Imiquimod cream is an immune response modifier approved for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts in adults. In the past, it was used in molluscum contagiosum (...) of streptococcal antigen [ ] have been shown to be effective in treating patients with resistant molluscum contagiosum. The high cost of these products limits their use to more extensive or resistant infections. The dosing schedule and length of treatment require further evaluation. A newer compound, Veregen, is a sinecatechin. Its true mechanism of action is unknown. It is a botanical extract from green tea. The 15% ointment is applied topically 3 times a day. It is FDA approved for topical therapy

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

52. Scabies

What are the complications? Complications of scabies infestation include: Secondary bacterial infection due to Staphylococcus aureus , group A β-haemolytic streptococci, or peptostreptococci, resulting in impetigo, folliculitis, furunculosis, ecthyma, or abscess. In developing countries, untreated secondary infection can lead to post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, renal failure, or rheumatic heart disease. Secondary eczematisation due to scratching, and also due to irritant effects of topical (...) the CKS topic on . Bullous pemphigoid — a blistering disease of elderly people, which often starts with pruritus and an urticaria-like rash, although this may occasionally be eczematous. Later, large, tense blisters develop. Contact dermatitis — suggested by a rash that develops within following contact with an allergen/irritant. For more information, see the CKS topic on . Dermatitis herpetiformis — a rare, chronic, recurrent, papulovesicular disease. It is symmetrical and consists of erythematous

2011 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

53. List of cutaneous conditions

, serpiginous ulceration of the groin, ulcerating granuloma of the pudendum, ulcerating sclerosing granuloma) ( Pseudomonas aeruginosa folliculitis) (Fort Bragg fever, pretibial fever, Weil's disease) (Afzelius' disease, Lyme borreliosis) (climatic bubo, Durand–Nicolas–Favre disease, lymphogranuloma inguinale, poradenitis inguinale, strumous bubo) (malacoplakia) (Boutonneuse fever) (Whitmore's disease) (flesh-eating bacteria syndrome) (Carrion's disease) (perineal dermatitis, streptococcal perianal disease (...) of many conditions often also requires a which yields information that can be correlated with the clinical presentation and any laboratory data. Contents Acneiform eruptions [ ] See also: are caused by changes in the . (Mallorca acne) (cosmetic acne) (acute febrile ulcerative acne) (acne keloidalis, dermatitis papillaris capillitii, folliculitis keloidalis, folliculitis keloidis nuchae, nuchal keloid acne) (acne varioliformis) (acne simplex) (solid facial edema) (erythematotelangiectatic rosacea

2012 Wikipedia

54. Occult varicella. (PubMed)

on the restricted sites of posttraumatic wound, perianal streptococcal dermatitis, dermatomycosis, allergic contact dermatitis, lichen sclerosus, and atopic foot dermatitis. All the Tzanck smears and 1 biopsy revealed multinucleated giant cells, consistent with herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection. Immunohistochemistry using specific anti-VZV antibodies (IE63 and gE) was positive on all the smears and the biopsy, whereas HSV-I and HSV-II immunolabeling was negative. VZV specific (...) Occult varicella. Localized varicella has been associated with UV-exposure and skin trauma. Varicella restricted to a pre-existent dermatitis is exceptional.The clinical features, cytohistologic and immunohistochemical results, as well as serologic data of 6 patients with a sudden eruption of vesicular and eroded lesions restricted to a pre-existent dermatitis are presented.All patients (mean age: 8,3 years, range: 3-22) showed crops of a few to numerous vesicular lesions clustered

2009 Pediatric Infectious Dsease Journal

55. Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis: An Important Differential Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients. (PubMed)

Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis: An Important Differential Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients. Perianal streptococcal dermatitis is an infectious disease that predominantly affects younger children and is mostly caused by Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. Although patients are mostly seen primarily by their pediatrician or family physician, the diagnosis is not infrequently established just after referral to a dermatologist or colorectal surgeon. We report a case series of 124 children, aged (...) 14 years or younger, who were seen at our office for anorectal complaints between February 2003 and September 2006. Twenty-one of 124 patients (16 percent) were diagnosed with perianal streptococcal dermatitis on the basis of a positive perianal swab by microbiologic analysis. Perianal streptococcal dermatitis was the most frequent infectious disease in that age group in our practice. Sixteen (of 21, 76 percent) patients were male, and the mean age was 6.3 years. One course of systemic antibiotic

2008 Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

56. Recurrent toxin-mediated perineal erythema: eleven pediatric cases. (PubMed)

streptococcal dermatitis. A group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus was isolated from the throat in 10 cases and from a perianal culture in 1 case. In 8 cases, resolution was spontaneous, but all patients were treated with systemic antimicrobial therapy for 10 days. Three patients had a personal history of cutaneous rashes on the perineal area during the last years before consultation. Rash recurrence was observed in 3 of the 11 patients at the follow-up examination. Conclusion Recurrent toxin-mediated (...) ) presented with the sudden appearance of asymptomatic erythema, which was salmonlike in color and rapidly desquamating, involving the perineum in 10 patients and extending to the perianal area in 1 patient. At the onset of the rash, all patients were in good health, although 9 had mild fever for 1 to 2 days before its appearance. Physical examination also revealed an erythema of the hands and feet in 4 patients and strawberry tongue in 7. Two patients had a facial impetigo, and another showed a perianal

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2008 Archives of Dermatology

57. Vulvitis

. In the acute form there is a sudden onset of an erythematous swollen painful vulva and vagina with a thin mucoid discharge. The subacute form usually presents as pruritic erythematous patches and plaques in the vulval and perianal regions. [ ] Group A beta haemolytic streptococcal infection can also cause a vulvovaginitis in adult women. [ ] Dermatological conditions . The most common vulval dermatosis in both adults and children is dermatitis. The majority of these patients are atopic (...) to assess subtle changes in the skin. A chaperone should be offered. As a minimum, the vulva, pubis and perianal area should be examined. The cervix and vagina should be included if genital infection is suspected. Other areas of skin should be examined if there are rashes elsewhere. For example, there may be evidence of facial, hand or flexural dermatitis. If the presenting complaint is mainly dyspareunia, pelvic muscle tone may need to be assessed. If the appearance is essentially normal it may

2008 Mentor

58. Comparative Trial of Oral Penicillin Versus Cefuroxim for Treatment of Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis

Comparative Trial of Oral Penicillin Versus Cefuroxim for Treatment of Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis Comparative Trial of Oral Penicillin Versus Cefuroxim for Treatment of Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100 (...) ). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Comparative Trial of Oral Penicillin Versus Cefuroxim for Treatment of Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00261742 Recruitment Status : Terminated First Posted : December 5, 2005 Last Update Posted

2005 Clinical Trials

59. Dermacase. Perianal streptococcal dermatitis. (PubMed)

Dermacase. Perianal streptococcal dermatitis. 10509216 1999 10 19 2018 11 13 0008-350X 45 1999 Sep Canadian family physician Medecin de famille canadien Can Fam Physician Dermacase. Perianal streptococcal dermatitis. 2059, 2066 Adams S P SP University of Calgary. eng Case Reports Journal Article Canada Can Fam Physician 0120300 0008-350X 0 Anti-Bacterial Agents 0 Penicillins D0GX863OA5 Mupirocin Z61I075U2W Penicillin V IM Administration, Topical Anal Canal Anti-Bacterial Agents administration (...) & dosage therapeutic use Dermatitis diagnosis drug therapy Diagnosis, Differential Humans Infant Male Mupirocin administration & dosage therapeutic use Penicillin V administration & dosage therapeutic use Penicillins administration & dosage therapeutic use Skin Diseases, Bacterial diagnosis drug therapy Streptococcal Infections diagnosis drug therapy Streptococcus pyogenes Time Factors 1999 10 6 1999 10 6 0 1 1999 10 6 0 0 ppublish 10509216 PMC2328537 Pediatr Dermatol. 1990 Jun;7(2):97-100 2359737 Br J

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1999 Canadian Family Physician

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