How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

55 results for

Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis

Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Perianal (...) Streptococcal Dermatitis Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis Aka: Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis , Perianal Streptococcal Cellulitis , Chronic Perianal Cellulitis II. Epidemiology Affects children ages 6 months to 10 years III. Cause IV. Risk Factors: Exposure to infection V. Symptoms Painful Blood streaked stools associated with s Perianal VI. Signs Bright red, sharply demarcated perianal rash Local spread to genitalia may occur No associated fever or systemic signs Yellow crust or mucoid discharge may

2018 FP Notebook

2. Guttate psoriasis triggered by perianal streptococcal infection. (Abstract)

Guttate psoriasis triggered by perianal streptococcal infection. The association of guttate psoriasis (GP) with streptococcal pharyngitis is well accepted. However, less is known about the association with perianal streptococcal infection. We report a case of a 19-month-old boy with GP after a preceding perianal streptococcal dermatitis, with no clinical signs of a streptococcal pharyngitis. Treatment with phenethicillin was given together with mometasone ointment. After 4 weeks, the perianal (...) redness was reduced and the psoriasis had improved significantly. A review of the literature revealed nine previous case reports, comprising a total of 15 patients. In all cases, the perianal dermatitis and the GP improved after treatment with oral antibiotics, sometimes in combination with topical corticosteroids. We conclude that in cases of GP in children, the perianal area must be examined for streptococcal infection.© 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

2017 Clinical & Experimental Dermatology

3. Perianal streptococcal infection precipitating pustular psoriasis in an adult Full Text available with Trip Pro

Perianal streptococcal infection precipitating pustular psoriasis in an adult 27504479 2016 08 09 2019 02 26 2352-5126 2 4 2016 Jul JAAD case reports JAAD Case Rep Perianal streptococcal infection precipitating pustular psoriasis in an adult. 281-3 10.1016/j.jdcr.2016.05.010 Maiolo Corinne C Department of Dermatology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. Kwok Samuel M SM Department of Dermatology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. Ross Christopher C Department (...) of Dermatology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. Ibbetson Jan J Department of Anatomical Pathology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, Australia. eng Case Reports 2016 07 25 United States JAAD Case Rep 101665210 2352-5126 Streptococcus adult infection perianal psoriasis pustular 2016 8 10 6 0 2016 8 10 6 0 2016 8 10 6 1 epublish 27504479 10.1016/j.jdcr.2016.05.010 S2352-5126(16)30038-8 PMC4968311 Pediatr Dermatol. 2000 Jan-Feb;17(1):1-6 10720979 Contact Dermatitis. 2005 Mar;52(3):142-4 15811028 J Cutan

2016 JAAD Case Reports

4. Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis

Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Perianal (...) Streptococcal Dermatitis Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis Aka: Perianal Streptococcal Dermatitis , Perianal Streptococcal Cellulitis , Chronic Perianal Cellulitis II. Epidemiology Affects children ages 6 months to 10 years III. Cause IV. Risk Factors: Exposure to infection V. Symptoms Painful Blood streaked stools associated with s Perianal VI. Signs Bright red, sharply demarcated perianal rash Local spread to genitalia may occur No associated fever or systemic signs Yellow crust or mucoid discharge may

2015 FP Notebook

5. Randomized, comparative efficacy trial of oral penicillin versus cefuroxime for perianal streptococcal dermatitis in children (Abstract)

Randomized, comparative efficacy trial of oral penicillin versus cefuroxime for perianal streptococcal dermatitis in children To investigate the efficacy of penicillin compared with cefuroxime for group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes (GABHS) perianal dermatitis.Children 1 to 16 years of age with signs and symptoms of perianal dermatitis and a positive anal swab were randomized to penicillin or cefuroxime treatment and were clinically re-evaluated on day 3 and at the end of treatment (...) with the ethics committee. Clinical improvement was more rapid in the cefuroxime group (P = .028) and GAHBS was not isolated from the anus the last day of therapy in 13 of 14 patients treated with cefuroxime compared with 7 of 15 patients treated with penicillin (P < .01).Cefuroxime was more effective than penicillin and therefore should be considered as the treatment of choice for perianal dermatitis due to GABHS.

2009 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

6. CRACKCast E137 – Skin Infections

cellulitis. Skin infection mimics include venous stasis dermatitis and other forms of dermatitis. Rosen’s in Perspective The skin is the largest organ in the body and accounts for about 15% of total body weight. It has three layers, the hypodermis, dermis, and epidermis. Let’s talk about some quick pathophysiology: The epidermal appendages are important as sites of infection because they provide a break in the otherwise continuous protective layer of keratinocytes and create a potential space (...) diagnosis for cellulitis Cellulitis is an inflammatory condition of skin and subcutaneous tissue thought to be the result of bacterial infection. It may be purulent or non-purulent and may occur in the setting of wounds, foreign bodies, or impaired perfusion. Differential Diagnoses Contact dermatitis Fungal infection Burns (superficial burns) Viral infections Insect bites (e.g. large localized reaction to hymenoptera sting) Allergies: including fixed drug eruptions localized inflammation. Necrotizing

2017 CandiEM

7. Nappy rash

. Lesions may be haemorrhagic, and the child may have a fever and be systemically unwell. See the CKS topic on for more information. Perianal streptococcal dermatitis Presents as a bright red, sharply demarcated perianal rash with possible maceration that may involve the penis and vulvovaginal area. Satellite lesions are uncommon. Perianal pain and itching are common and defecation may be painful. It is usually caused by group A beta-haemolytic streptoccocus (GABHS). Infantile seborrhoeic dermatitis (...) volume and pH, such as gastroenteritis, malabsorption, and liver conditions such as hepatitis (rare). [ ; ; ; ; ; ] Complications What are the complications? Complications of nappy rash include: Candida secondary infection — see the CKS topic on for more information. Bacterial secondary infection — may be caused by staphylococcal or streptococcal infection. See the CKS topics on , , and for more information. Jacquet's erosive diaper dermatitis — presents with punched out ulcers or erosions

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

8. Scabies

infestation include: Secondary bacterial infection due to Staphylococcus aureus , group A β-haemolytic streptococci, or peptostreptococci, resulting in impetigo, folliculitis, furunculosis, ecthyma, or abscess. In developing countries, untreated secondary infection can lead to post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, renal failure, or rheumatic heart disease. Secondary eczematisation due to scratching, and also due to irritant effects of topical medication. Nodular scabies — pruritic nodules of the axillae (...) of elderly people, which often starts with pruritus and an urticaria-like rash, although this may occasionally be eczematous. Later, large, tense blisters develop. Contact dermatitis — suggested by a rash that develops within following contact with an allergen/irritant. For more information, see the CKS topic on . Dermatitis herpetiformis — a rare, chronic, recurrent, papulovesicular disease. It is symmetrical and consists of erythematous, urticarial, papular, or vesicular lesions located on the extensor

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

10. Pruritus ani

. Psychological pruritus ani — itching is associated with psychosomatic or psychiatric disorders (such as depression). Secondary pruritus ani has many possible causes, including: Skin conditions, such as dermatitis and psoriasis. Infections and infestations, such as a staphylococcal infections (which may also present with anal discharge) and scabies. Colorectal and anal pathology, such as anal fissure and haemorrhoids (which may also present with perianal pain and bleeding) and colorectal cancer (which may (...) (anorectal dysfunction) causes itching and transient perianal erythema. Psychological pruritus ani — itching is associated with psychosomatic or psychiatric disorders (such as depression). Secondary pruritus ani can be caused by a number of underlying disorders, including [ ; ; ; ; ; ]: Skin conditions (50% of cases), including: Primary conditions, such as atopic eczema, Bowen's disease, lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, psoriasis, seborrhoeic dermatitis, and Paget's disease (very rare). Secondary

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

11. Child Abuse Mimic: Avulsion Injury in a Child With Penoscrotal Webbing. (Abstract)

, perianal streptococcal dermatitis, and straddle injury (J Pediatr Health Care. 2009;23:283-288 and Acta Paediatr. 2011;100:590-593). The following case involves a 5-week-old male infant who presented to the pediatric emergency department with an avulsion injury to his penis concerning for sexual abuse. He was ultimately diagnosed with a relatively rare anatomic variant of the genitalia and determined to have sustained an accidental injury whose appearance mimicked abuse.

2015 Pediatric Emergency Care

12. Bacterial Infections and Pregnancy (Follow-up)

the initial insult face possible hearing or vision loss, learning disabilities, and other neurologic sequelae CDC recommendations are as follows: At 35-37 weeks’ gestation, all pregnant women should undergo screening with a vaginal and rectal swab for culture [ ] The most specific site for culture is at the introitus, just inside the hymeneal ring and rectally beyond the sphincter; cervical, perianal, perirectal, or perineal specimens are not acceptable, and speculum should not be used for culture (...) of bacterial STDs Gonococcal infections cause no symptoms in approximately 50% of patients Pregnancy is a predisposing factor to the development of disseminated gonococcal infection, which classically presents as an arthritis-dermatitis syndrome Newborns exposed to gonorrhea during vaginal delivery can develop an acute conjunctivitis (ophthalmia neonatorum), sepsis, arthritis, and/or meningitis The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends screening (via endocervical culture) in high

2014 eMedicine.com

13. Psoriasis, Guttate (Diagnosis)

common in individuals younger than 30 years. An upper respiratory tract infection from group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (eg, Streptococcus pyogenes ) often precedes the eruption by 2-3 weeks. [ ] Streptococcal perianal dermatitis, a superficial bacterial infection of the anus and perianal skin in children, has also been linked with the appearance of guttate psoriasis. [ , ] Although episodes may recur, especially those due to pharyngeal carriage of streptococci, isolated bouts have commonly been (...) A, Kayam N, Sela S, Fry L, Baker B, et al. An investigation of antistreptococcal antibody responses in guttate psoriasis. Arch Dermatol Res . 2008 Sep. 300(8):441-9. . Ulger Z, Gelenava T, Kosay Y, Darcan S. Acute guttate psoriasis associated with streptococcal perianal dermatitis. Clin Pediatr (Phila) . 2007 Jan. 46(1):70-2. . Ledoux M, Chazerain V, Saiag P, Mahe E. [Streptococcal perianal dermatitis and guttate psoriasis]. Ann Dermatol Venereol . 2009 Jan. 136(1):37-41. . Shin MS, Kim SJ, Kim SH

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Impetigo (Diagnosis)

form. [ ] It tends to affect the face, extremities, axillae, trunk, and perianal region of neonates, but older children and adults can also be infected. [ ] The initial lesions are fragile thin-roofed, flaccid, and transparent bullae (< 3 cm) with a clear, yellow fluid that turns cloudy and dark yellow. Once the bullae rupture, they leave behind a rim of scale around an erythematous moist base but no crust, followed by a brown-lacquered or scalded-skin appearance, with a collarette of scale (...) , is the most common skin infection in children, accounting for approximately 10% of all cutaneous problems in pediatric clinics. It is more contagious than the bullous type. [ ] Common impetigo is the term applied when the infection occurs in preexisting wounds. Impetigo as a secondary infection of preexisting skin disease or traumatized skin has also been referred to as impetiginous dermatitis. Nonbullous impetigo is caused by , (GABHS, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes ), or a combination of both

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Impetigo (Diagnosis)

form. [ ] It tends to affect the face, extremities, axillae, trunk, and perianal region of neonates, but older children and adults can also be infected. [ ] The initial lesions are fragile thin-roofed, flaccid, and transparent bullae (< 3 cm) with a clear, yellow fluid that turns cloudy and dark yellow. Once the bullae rupture, they leave behind a rim of scale around an erythematous moist base but no crust, followed by a brown-lacquered or scalded-skin appearance, with a collarette of scale (...) , is the most common skin infection in children, accounting for approximately 10% of all cutaneous problems in pediatric clinics. It is more contagious than the bullous type. [ ] Common impetigo is the term applied when the infection occurs in preexisting wounds. Impetigo as a secondary infection of preexisting skin disease or traumatized skin has also been referred to as impetiginous dermatitis. Nonbullous impetigo is caused by , (GABHS, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes ), or a combination of both

2014 eMedicine.com

16. Psoriasis, Guttate (Overview)

common in individuals younger than 30 years. An upper respiratory tract infection from group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (eg, Streptococcus pyogenes ) often precedes the eruption by 2-3 weeks. [ ] Streptococcal perianal dermatitis, a superficial bacterial infection of the anus and perianal skin in children, has also been linked with the appearance of guttate psoriasis. [ , ] Although episodes may recur, especially those due to pharyngeal carriage of streptococci, isolated bouts have commonly been (...) A, Kayam N, Sela S, Fry L, Baker B, et al. An investigation of antistreptococcal antibody responses in guttate psoriasis. Arch Dermatol Res . 2008 Sep. 300(8):441-9. . Ulger Z, Gelenava T, Kosay Y, Darcan S. Acute guttate psoriasis associated with streptococcal perianal dermatitis. Clin Pediatr (Phila) . 2007 Jan. 46(1):70-2. . Ledoux M, Chazerain V, Saiag P, Mahe E. [Streptococcal perianal dermatitis and guttate psoriasis]. Ann Dermatol Venereol . 2009 Jan. 136(1):37-41. . Shin MS, Kim SJ, Kim SH

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Dermatologic Diseases of the Male Genitalia: Nonmalignant (Treatment)

and diagnostic tests, including KOH and Tzanck preparations, can help determine the correct diagnosis. Biopsy is generally not necessary, although a lack of response to treatment warrants a biopsy to exclude premalignant or malignant lesions. Differential diagnoses The differential diagnoses include intertrigo (see ); irritant dermatitis; and candidal (see ), viral, or fungal infections. [ , ] As emphasized above, the clinical history, in association with KOH and Tzanck preparations, often helps to determine (...) is necessary to differentiate these diseases. Erosive lichen planus, contact dermatitis, psoriasis, and immunobullous diseases can cause similar clinical lesions in the glans region. Balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO; see ) can show similar microscopic features of a dense inflammatory infiltrate and a thinned epidermis; however, the infiltrate usually lacks a rich plasma cell component. Candidal balanitis should also be considered in the differential diagnoses. Although previously described as a separate

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Bacterial Infections and Pregnancy (Treatment)

the initial insult face possible hearing or vision loss, learning disabilities, and other neurologic sequelae CDC recommendations are as follows: At 35-37 weeks’ gestation, all pregnant women should undergo screening with a vaginal and rectal swab for culture [ ] The most specific site for culture is at the introitus, just inside the hymeneal ring and rectally beyond the sphincter; cervical, perianal, perirectal, or perineal specimens are not acceptable, and speculum should not be used for culture (...) of bacterial STDs Gonococcal infections cause no symptoms in approximately 50% of patients Pregnancy is a predisposing factor to the development of disseminated gonococcal infection, which classically presents as an arthritis-dermatitis syndrome Newborns exposed to gonorrhea during vaginal delivery can develop an acute conjunctivitis (ophthalmia neonatorum), sepsis, arthritis, and/or meningitis The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends screening (via endocervical culture) in high

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Psoriasis, Guttate (Treatment)

common in individuals younger than 30 years. An upper respiratory tract infection from group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (eg, Streptococcus pyogenes ) often precedes the eruption by 2-3 weeks. [ ] Streptococcal perianal dermatitis, a superficial bacterial infection of the anus and perianal skin in children, has also been linked with the appearance of guttate psoriasis. [ , ] Although episodes may recur, especially those due to pharyngeal carriage of streptococci, isolated bouts have commonly been (...) A, Kayam N, Sela S, Fry L, Baker B, et al. An investigation of antistreptococcal antibody responses in guttate psoriasis. Arch Dermatol Res . 2008 Sep. 300(8):441-9. . Ulger Z, Gelenava T, Kosay Y, Darcan S. Acute guttate psoriasis associated with streptococcal perianal dermatitis. Clin Pediatr (Phila) . 2007 Jan. 46(1):70-2. . Ledoux M, Chazerain V, Saiag P, Mahe E. [Streptococcal perianal dermatitis and guttate psoriasis]. Ann Dermatol Venereol . 2009 Jan. 136(1):37-41. . Shin MS, Kim SJ, Kim SH

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Molluscum Contagiosum (Treatment)

that subcutaneous interferon-alfa administered intralesionally may be useful in immunocompromised children. A case report noted the efficacy of topical cidofovir in the treatment of disseminated molluscum in immunodepressed patients. [ ] Cidofovir diphosphate was reported to inhibit molluscum contagiosum virus DNA polymerase activity. [ ] Imiquimod cream is an immune response modifier approved for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts in adults. In the past, it was used in molluscum contagiosum (...) of streptococcal antigen [ ] have been shown to be effective in treating patients with resistant molluscum contagiosum. The high cost of these products limits their use to more extensive or resistant infections. The dosing schedule and length of treatment require further evaluation. A newer compound, Veregen, is a sinecatechin. Its true mechanism of action is unknown. It is a botanical extract from green tea. The 15% ointment is applied topically 3 times a day. It is FDA approved for topical therapy

2014 eMedicine.com

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>