How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,360 results for

Pelvic Relaxation

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Automatic classification of tissues on pelvic MRI based on relaxation times and support vector machine. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Automatic classification of tissues on pelvic MRI based on relaxation times and support vector machine. Tissue segmentation and classification in MRI is a challenging task due to a lack of signal intensity standardization. MRI signal is dependent on the acquisition protocol, the coil profile, the scanner type, etc. While we can compute quantitative physical tissue properties independent of the hardware and the sequence parameters, it is still difficult to leverage these physical properties (...) to segment and classify pelvic tissues. The proposed method integrates quantitative MRI values (T1 and T2 relaxation times and pure synthetic weighted images) and machine learning (Support Vector Machine (SVM)) to segment and classify tissues in the pelvic region, i.e.: fat, muscle, prostate, bone marrow, bladder, and air. Twenty-two men with a mean age of 30±14 years were included in this prospective study. The images were acquired with a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. An inversion recovery-prepared turbo spin

2019 PLoS ONE

2. Non-relaxing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction is an Underestimated Complication of Ileal Pouch-Anal Anastomosis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Non-relaxing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction is an Underestimated Complication of Ileal Pouch-Anal Anastomosis. Nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction (N-RPFD), or dyssynergic defecation, is the paradoxical contraction and/or impaired relaxation of pelvic floor and anal muscles during defecation. Few studies have evaluated this disorder in patients with an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). We investigated the frequency of N-RPFD in patients with and without chronic pouchitis following IPAA

2017 Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

3. Pelvic Relaxation

Pelvic Relaxation Pelvic Relaxation Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Pelvic Relaxation Pelvic Relaxation Aka: Pelvic (...) Relaxation From Related Chapters II. Symptoms Vague pelvic ache Sensation of pressure or Something falling out III. Causes Enterocele Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Pelvic Relaxation." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in Symptoms About FPnotebook.com is a rapid access, point-of-care medical reference for primary

2018 FP Notebook

4. Chronic Pelvic Pain

, double-blind trial. J Urol, 2006. 176: 1442. 137. Rosen, R.C., et al. The international index of erectile function (IIEF): a multidimensional scale for assessment of erectile dysfunction. Urology, 1997. 49: 822. 138. Anderson, R.U., et al. Sexual dysfunction in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: improvement after trigger point release and paradoxical relaxation training. J Urol, 2006. 176: 1534. 139. Trinchieri, A., et al. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction in men with chronic (...) : 1179. 276. Davis, S.N., et al. Use of pelvic floor ultrasound to assess pelvic floor muscle function in urological chronic pelvic pain syndrome in men. J Sex Med, 2011. 8: 3173. 277. Anderson, R.U., et al. Painful myofascial trigger points and pain sites in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. J Urol, 2009. 182: 2753. 278. Sanses, T.V., et al. The Pelvis and Beyond: Musculoskeletal Tender Points in Women With Chronic Pelvic Pain. Clin J Pain, 2016. 32: 659. 279. Yang, C.C., et

2019 European Association of Urology

5. Anorectal Physiology Testing and Pelvic Floor Terminology

Anorectal Physiology Testing and Pelvic Floor Terminology Downloaded from https://journals.lww.com/dcrjournal by BhDMf5ePHKav1zEoum1tQfN4a+kJLhEZgbsIHo4XMi0hCywCX1AWnYQp/IlQrHD3IJrtBKuSsQVRz8fA4yAY0a8W1YLRn6mHykFpaZ5LFvI= on 03/16/2018 Downloaded from https://journals.lww.com/dcrjournal by BhDMf5ePHKav1zEoum1tQfN4a+kJLhEZgbsIHo4XMi0hCywCX1AWnYQp/IlQrHD3IJrtBKuSsQVRz8fA4yAY0a8W1YLRn6mHykFpaZ5LFvI= on 03/16/2018 Copyright © The American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons, Inc. Unauthorized (...) - nology used must be precise and uniform. With medical information increasingly shared, a consensus about the terminology is desirable. The purpose of this document is to define standardized terminology for use in academic presentations and publications pertaining to defecatory pelvic floor disorders. METHODOLOGY The ASCRS, the Colorectal Surgical Society of Australia, and the Association of Coloproctology of Great Brit- ain and Ireland have previously published definitions of anorectal physiology

2018 American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

6. Guidelines for the Evaluation and Treatment of Recurrent Urinary Incontinence Following Pelvic Floor Surgery

Guidelines for the Evaluation and Treatment of Recurrent Urinary Incontinence Following Pelvic Floor Surgery No. 248-Guidelines for the Evaluation and Treatment of Recurrent Urinary Incontinence Following Pelvic Floor Surgery - Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Volume 39, Issue 9, Pages e309–e314 No. 248-Guidelines for the Evaluation and Treatment of Recurrent Urinary Incontinence Following Pelvic Floor Surgery x (...) Danny Lovatsis , MD Toronto, ON x William Easton , MD Scarborough, ON x David Wilkie , MD Vancouver, BC No. 248, September 2017 (Replaces No. 74, July 1998) DOI: To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Abstract Objective To provide general gynaecologists and urogynaecologists with clinical guidelines for the management of recurrent urinary incontinence after pelvic floor surgery. Options Evaluation includes history and physical

2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada

7. Chronic Pelvic Pain

, double-blind trial. J Urol, 2006. 176: 1442. 137. Rosen, R.C., et al. The international index of erectile function (IIEF): a multidimensional scale for assessment of erectile dysfunction. Urology, 1997. 49: 822. 138. Anderson, R.U., et al. Sexual dysfunction in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: improvement after trigger point release and paradoxical relaxation training. J Urol, 2006. 176: 1534. 139. Trinchieri, A., et al. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction in men with chronic (...) : 1179. 276. Davis, S.N., et al. Use of pelvic floor ultrasound to assess pelvic floor muscle function in urological chronic pelvic pain syndrome in men. J Sex Med, 2011. 8: 3173. 277. Anderson, R.U., et al. Painful myofascial trigger points and pain sites in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. J Urol, 2009. 182: 2753. 278. Sanses, T.V., et al. The Pelvis and Beyond: Musculoskeletal Tender Points in Women With Chronic Pelvic Pain. Clin J Pain, 2016. 32: 659. 279. Yang, C.C., et

2018 European Association of Urology

8. Pelvic Girdle Pain in the Antepartum Population: Physical Therapy Clinical Practice Guidelines Linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health From the Section on Women's Health and the Orthopaedic Section of the American Full Text available with Trip Pro

hypermobility, periods of amenorrhea, increased BMI, and hip and/or lower extremity dysfunction including the presence of gluteus medius and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. There is an association of the development of PGP with a history of trauma to the pelvis and a history of LBP and/or PGP, especially in a previous pregnancy. Finally, an association also exists with work dissatisfaction and lack of belief in improvement. I. Smoking during the antepartum period as well as cessation of smoking (...) on a pain diagram. The intervention group (n = 26) underwent a 10-week progressive exercise program including group training, a home exercise program, and education using a posture and ergonomics brochure. The control group (n = 24) received only the posture and ergonomics brochure. Exercises included stretching, relaxation, breathing, and isometric pelvic stabilization with progressive exercise to include coactivation with gluteals, hip abductors, and quadriceps. While the authors reported low

2017 American Physical Therapy Association

9. High-Low Impact Exercise Program Including Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises Improves Pelvic Floor Muscle Function in Healthy Pregnant Women - A Randomized Control Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

their abilities for relaxation following 3- and 10-s contractions (p = 0.013 and p < 0.001). In controls, we reported no statistically significant improvement in either of the motor tasks. All study participants maintained good quality of life related to urinary incontinence. Conclusion: Prenatal exercise programs that include high- and low-impact aerobics and are supported by pelvic floor muscle exercises should be recommended for pregnant women, especially those who are accustomed to higher exercise (...) High-Low Impact Exercise Program Including Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises Improves Pelvic Floor Muscle Function in Healthy Pregnant Women - A Randomized Control Trial. Background: Pregnancy and high-impact activity are considered as risk factors for pelvic floor dysfunctions, including urinary incontinence. Aim: To investigate whether a structured exercise program, including high- and low-impact aerobics and supported by pelvic floor muscle exercises, improves the neuromuscular activity

2018 Frontiers in physiology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

10. Effect of intravaginal vibratory versus electric stimulation on the pelvic floor muscles: A randomized clinical trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of intravaginal vibratory versus electric stimulation on the pelvic floor muscles: A randomized clinical trial. According to the International Urogynecological Association and International Continence Society people with normal pelvic floor muscle function should have the ability to voluntarily and involuntarily contract and relax these muscles. However, many women are unaware of their pelvic floor, and it is estimated that about 30-50% do not know how to actively contract these muscles (...) . Within this context, therapeutic strategies to improve pelvic floor muscle strength and function are particularly relevant.To compare the use of an intravaginal vibratory stimulus (IVVS) versus intravaginal electrical stimulation (IVES) on pelvic floor muscle functionality in women with pelvic floor dysfunctions who cannot voluntarily contract these muscles.Randomized clinical trial performed at a tertiary care hospital from June 2016 to September 2017. The sample comprised adult women with pelvic

2019 European journal of obstetrics & gynecology and reproductive biology: X Controlled trial quality: uncertain

11. Inter- and Intraobserver reproducibility of T2 relaxation times of the discus interpubicus: A feasibility study at 3 Tesla. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Inter- and Intraobserver reproducibility of T2 relaxation times of the discus interpubicus: A feasibility study at 3 Tesla. To quantify standard values of the discus interpubicus in healthy subjects and to determine reliability and repeatability using T2 relaxation time measurements at 3T.20 asymptomatic participants (10 male, 10 female; mean age: 27.3 years ±4.1, BMI: 22.2 ±1.8) underwent a 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the pelvic region in a supine position. We included sagittal (...) regions-of-interest (ROI) covering the whole discus interpubicus. Both readers repeated the ROI placements in identical fashion after a four-week interval on the original MRI images. Statistical analysis included intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), nonparametric Wilcoxon test, Fisher exact test and mean relaxation time in ms and 95% confidence intervals.T2 relaxation time analysis was performed for all 20 participants. In total, a mean relaxation time of all analysed segments for both observers

2018 PLoS ONE

12. The effect of pelvic motion on spino-pelvic parameters. (Abstract)

The effect of pelvic motion on spino-pelvic parameters. To date, many studies have examined how pelvic position affects the spinal curvature and spinopelvic parameters. However, these studies focus on a static relationship, comparing pelvis and spine in a relaxed or baseline position only. Indeed, the spinopelvic connection is dynamic, as subjects can easily be taught to rotate their pelvis anteriorly or posteriorly on the femoral head, all while maintaining an erect posture. Therefore (...) , for a true understanding of pelvic influence on the spinal column, it is necessary to examine spinopelvic parameters in multiple pelvic positions within the same subject.The objective of this study was to examine the dynamic effect of pelvic motion on the spine and associated radiographic parameters.This is a single-center, cross-sectional study of 50 healthy, asymptomatic volunteers.Subjects were recruited and screened based on the following criteria: between 18 and 79 years of age; no known spinal

2017 The Spine Journal

13. Comprehensive pelvic floor physical therapy program for men with idiopathic chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a prospective study Full Text available with Trip Pro

included 14 men who underwent physical therapy for idiopathic CPPS from October 2015 to October 2016. Men with clearly identifiable causes of pelvic pain, such as previous surgery, chronic infection, trauma, prostatitis and epididymitis were excluded. Treatment included: (I) manual therapy (internal and external) of pelvic floor and abdominal musculature to facilitate relaxation of muscles; (II) therapeutic exercises to promote range of motion, improve mobility/flexibility and strengthen weak muscles (...) ; (III) biofeedback to facilitate strengthening and relaxation of pelvic floor musculature; (IV) neuromodulation for pelvic floor muscle relaxation and pain relief. GUPI questionnaires were collected at initial evaluation and after the 10th visit. Higher scores reflect worse symptoms. Previous validation of the GUPI calculated a reduction of 7 points to robustly predict being a treatment responder (sensitivity 100%, specificity 76%) and a change in 4 points to predict modest response. Data

2017 Translational andrology and urology

14. Pelvic Floor Muscles Training Associated Dry Needling for Chronic Pelvic Pain

-cyclic pain located in the distal region of the abdomen and pelvis, often refractory to conventional treatments, lasting more than six months The presence of trigger points in the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) is a frequent condition in individuals with CPP and is associated with higher levels of pain, disability and functional decline. Secondary dysfunctions associated with the clinical picture of chronic pelvic pain can be treated with muscle training through the use of biofeedback and dry needling (...) Pelvic Floor Muscles Training Associated Dry Needling for Chronic Pelvic Pain Pelvic Floor Muscles Training Associated Dry Needling for Chronic Pelvic Pain - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more

2017 Clinical Trials

15. Trans-perineal Ultrasound & Dynamic Pelvic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessment of Pelvic Floor Dysfunction.

including altered collagen metabolism, female sex, vaginal delivery, menopause, and advanced age. A complex variety of fascial and muscular lesions that range from stretching, insertion detachment, denervation atrophy, and combinations of pelvic floor relaxation to pelvic organ prolapse may manifest in a single patient. The prevalence of pelvic floor dysfunction increases with age. It is approximately 9.7% in child bearing period (20-39 yrs), while it reaches up to 49.7% by 80 yrs and older. Thorough (...) Trans-perineal Ultrasound & Dynamic Pelvic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessment of Pelvic Floor Dysfunction. Trans-perineal Ultrasound & Dynamic Pelvic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Assessment of Pelvic Floor Dysfunction. - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved

2017 Clinical Trials

16. Comparison of whole body sagittal alignment during directed versus natural, relaxed standing postures in young, healthy adults. (Abstract)

radiographic differences between directed and natural, relaxed standing postures in young healthy subjects.A randomized, prospective, radiographic study PATIENT SAMPLE: 60 healthy 21-year-old subjects (48 male, 12 female) OUTCOME MEASURES: Radiographic parameters including sagittal vertical axis (SVA), C2 SVA, C2-7 SVA global cervical angle (GCA), T1-slope, global thoracic angle (GTA), thoracolumbar angle (TLA), global lumbar angle (GLA), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), pelvic incidence (PI), femoral (...) Comparison of whole body sagittal alignment during directed versus natural, relaxed standing postures in young, healthy adults. Imaging for adult spinal deformity is conventionally performed in a directed manner to assess the most upright standing posture one can assume. However, this method does not reflect an individual's natural, relaxed posture, which is the posture a patient likely reverts to post-operatively, and also the posture likely to explain spinal pathologies.To identify

2019 The Spine Journal Controlled trial quality: uncertain

17. Chronic prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome

have a role in ameliorating symptoms of CBP and CP/CPPS. Therapies that aim to improve relaxation and coordinated use of the pelvic floor muscles, such as biofeedback physical therapy and pelvic floor re-education, may also play a role in providing symptom improvement in CP/CPPS patients. Three small (n=19 to 31) pilot studies 96-98 have shown the introduction of a pelvic floor biofeedback re- educating programme significantly reduces symptom severity in patients with CP/CPPS. The largest (...) treatments, such as mindfulness/relaxation, would be useful in these patients groups. ? Further research is required to investigate the possible association of CBP and CP/CPPS with other co- morbidities; for example, IBS. ? Clinical studies and RCTs on any treatment modality for the management of CBP or CP/CPPS need to include long-term (at least five years) follow-up with annual assessments. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome

2015 Prostate Cancer UK

18. Changes of diaphragmatic excursion and lung compliance during major laparoscopic pelvic surgery: A prospective observational study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

postoperative pulmonary complication, postoperative chest radiography was checked. Static lung compliance, dynamic lung compliance and diaphragmatic excursion were decreased during operation (P < 0.001, respectively). At the end of the operation with recovery of muscle relaxation, reduced diaphragmatic movement was not recovered as its excursion after sedation (P < 0.001). In conclusion, lung compliance was decreased following transiently decreased diaphragmatic excursion during major laparoscopic pelvic (...) Changes of diaphragmatic excursion and lung compliance during major laparoscopic pelvic surgery: A prospective observational study. Major laparoscopic pelvic surgery requires steep Trendelenburg position with pneumoperitoneum for a long time. We investigated the effect of Trendelenburg position with pneumoperitoneum on diaphragmatic excursion and lung compliance during major laparoscopic pelvic surgery using M-mode sonography. Twenty patients undergoing elective pelviscopic radical hysterectomy

2018 PLoS ONE

19. An immediate effect of PNF specific mobilization on the angle of trunk rotation and the Trunk-Pelvis-Hip Angle range of motion in adolescent girls with double idiopathic scoliosis—a pilot study Full Text available with Trip Pro

°) and a left-sided thoracolumbar or lumbar curve (mean 20.8° ± 11.4°). The angle of trunk rotation and Trunk-Pelvis-Hip Angle were measured at baseline and after PNF mobilization. Bilateral lower limb patterns of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation were used in combination with the "contract-relax" technique and stimulation of asymmetrical breathing. In the statistical analysis, the SAS rel. 13.2 software was used. Preliminary statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistics. According (...) An immediate effect of PNF specific mobilization on the angle of trunk rotation and the Trunk-Pelvis-Hip Angle range of motion in adolescent girls with double idiopathic scoliosis—a pilot study Impairment of spine rotation is a key concept in several theories explaining the pathogenesis and progression of scoliosis. In previous studies, a more limited range of motion in scoliotic girls compared to their non-scoliotic peers was noted. The Trunk-Pelvis-Hip Angle measurement is a test used

2017 Scoliosis and spinal disorders

20. Chronic Pelvic Pain

17 3.2.2 Definition 17 3.2.3 Pathogenesis 18 3.2.4 Epidemiology 18 3.2.5 Diagnosis 18 3.2.6 Conclusions and recommendations: assessment/diagnosis PPS 19 3.2.7 Treatment 19 3.2.7.1 Alpha-blockers 19 3.2.7.2 Antibiotic therapy 19 3.2.7.3 Anti-inflammatory drugs 20 3.2.7.4 Opioids 20 3.2.7.5 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors 20 3.2.7.6 Allopurinol 20 3.2.7.7 Phytotherapy 20 3.2.7.8 Pentosan polysulphate 20 3.2.7.9 Muscle relaxants 21CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN - UPDATE APRIL 2014 3 3.2.7.10 Pregabalin 21 (...) as “pain as a disease” and its associated psychological, behavioural, sexual and functional correlates. After 10 years work developing the initial ideas, an updated version was accepted by IASP Council for publication in January 2012. 2.4.2.1 Definition of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) Chronic pelvic pain is chronic or persistent pain perceived* in structures related to the pelvis of either men or women. It is often associated with negative cognitive, behavioural, sexual and emotional consequences as well

2015 European Association of Urology

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>