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Pediatric Books

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221. Fit 5 Kids Screen Time Reduction Curriculum for Latino Preschoolers

Research Center Baylor College of Medicine USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center Information provided by (Responsible Party): Jason Mendoza, MD, MPH, Seattle Children's Hospital Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Childhood obesity and metabolic risk are at record high levels in the US, and Latino children are at very high risk. This project will test an intervention called Fit 5 Kids, designed for Latino preschoolers to decrease their screen time in order to promote physical (...) a school year (8-months) H1) Fit 5 Kids will decrease children's screen time, BMI z-scores and dietary energy intake, and increase fruit/vegetable intake, skin carotenoids, and moderate/vigorous physical activity (MVPA) compared to controls SA2) To examine mediators and moderators associated with reducing Latino preschoolers' screen time H2) Parents' outcome expectations, self-efficacy, and TV parenting practices will mediate the relationship between Fit 5 Kids and changes to preschoolers' screen time

2018 Clinical Trials

222. 2015 Samuel Johnson Prize Goes to NeuroTribes, by Steve Silberman – First science book to win UK’s top nonfiction book award

of the eugenicist beliefs described in your book, where references to non-typical people, in the context of arguing for their sterilization, institutionalization, or murder, are littered with phrases like “unfit,” “social discards,” “morally impaired,” “menace,” “hopeless”? SS: It’s the same impulse behind talking about autistic children as being kidnapped or not leading the lives that they were supposed to lead, both of which phrases have been used by Suzanne Wright, the co-founder of the leading autism (...) of child psychiatry as a new venture in America. I think that it is crucial to understand the specific decisions that these clinicians and researchers made that had a such a profound effect on autistic people and their families. EJW: So many of the people charged with the care and investigation of these children not only dehumanized them but also demonized them. As an example, Lovaas literally treated autistic people like rats, saying that “they are not people in the psychological sense.” SS: Here’s

2015 PLOS Blogs Network

223. The relationship between teacher qualification and the quality of the early childhood education and care environment Full Text available with Trip Pro

research projects support the notion that high‐quality (compared with low‐quality) ECEC is more likely to support optimal child social, emotional and cognitive development, promote growth experiences (including nurturing and attachment), and facilitate positive interaction among teachers and children ( ; ). These positive developmental and social experiences, as well as a supportive and nurturing environment, in the early years (e.g., preschool years) are commonly translated into improved school (...) to avoid vague and nonspecific operational definitions of quality (e.g., any “all‐encompassing” term), early childhood researchers have commonly conceptualized and disaggregated the multidimensional ECEC quality into two measurable interrelated components: (1) structural quality ‐ this refers to structural indicators such as child‐to‐staff ratios and caregiver characteristics such as teacher formal education; and (2) process quality ‐ including learning opportunities available to the children

2017 Campbell Collaboration

224. The Tools of the Mind curriculum for improving self?regulation in early childhood: a sytematic review Full Text available with Trip Pro

intervention in preschool contexts holds considerable promise for improving a child's development trajectory. As Heckman noted, early “skill begets skill; learning begets learning” ( , p. 3). Consequently, small self‐regulatory differences in early childhood can be magnified to progressively larger differences over time ( ; O'shaughnessy, Lane, Gresham, & ). Thus, early childhood emerges as an especially critical period in which to intervene. Research about the challenges of self‐regulation promotion (...) further underscores the need for early interventions. A nationally representative survey indicated that 46% of American kindergarten teachers reported at least half of their students as routinely struggling with self‐regulation ( ). In fact, American preschool students are three times more likely to be expelled for unmanageable behavior than primary and secondary students ( ). Based on these statistics, it seems that many early childhood educational settings are neither meeting children's needs nor

2017 Campbell Collaboration

225. Preschool predictors of later reading comprehension ability: a systematic review Full Text available with Trip Pro

, SES, language, country) explain any observed differences between the studies included? To answer our research questions, we have summarized available research on the topic by conducting a meta‐analysis. Methods Criteria for considering studies for this review Types of studies The studies included in this review are longitudinal observational non‐experimental studies that follow a group of children from preschool age into school age. In addition, business‐as‐usual controls in experimental studies (...) to include a study of mainly monolingual typical children (i.e., not simply included because of a special group affiliation)? Response options: Yes/No/Can't tell 3) Does the reference appear to have data from both preschool and school? Response options: Yes/No/Can't tell 4) Does the reference appear to include data on at least one of the predictors and on later reading comprehension? Response options: Yes/No/Can't tell 5) Should this reference be included at this stage? Response options: Yes/No If any

2017 Campbell Collaboration

226. Spot the Diagnosis! The Case of the Dropsical Child Full Text available with Trip Pro

condition. 1 The only feature of this child that is inconsistent with the diagnosis is his well-nourished appearance. Generally, infants and children with cyanotic heart lesions experience failure to thrive. One speculation for this discrepancy is the artistic preference of the time, which includes depicting their subjects as healthy and robust. 1 What is the pathophysiology of the condition? VSD is an acyanotic heart defect at first. Oxygenated blood from the left ventricle is shunted to the right (...) Spot the Diagnosis! The Case of the Dropsical Child Spot the Diagnosis! The Case of the Dropsical Child - CanadiEM Spot the Diagnosis! The Case of the Dropsical Child In , , by Leah Zhao September 13, 2018 In this Spot the Diagnosis! post, we have the case of an ill looking child, brought in for healing by a worried mother. Through the symbolic ox, the haloed saint is identified as St Luke, a physician in the New Testament. (Note the book at his lap entitled “Hippocrates”.) (Can you also see St

2018 CandiEM

227. WHO recommendations on home-based records for maternal, newborn and child health

/10665/274286/ WHO-MCA-18.05-eng.pdfviii WHO recommendations on home-based records for maternal, newborn and child health Table 1. Recommendations on home-based records Recommendations 1. The use of home-based records, as a complement to facility-based records, is recommended for the care of pregnant women, mothers, newborns and children, to improve care-seeking behaviours, male involvement and support in the household, maternal and child home care practices, infant and child feeding (...) in their design and the information they document. They can be: maternal home-based records that include identifying information, antenatal notes, and care during childbirth and after birth; vaccination-only cards which record vaccination history; expanded vaccination-plus cards which provide a record of vaccinations and health care, growth and development and illness management for newborns and children. Another type of home- based record is child health books, which record vaccinations, health care, growth

2018 World Health Organisation Guidelines

228. Breastfeeding-Friendly Physician?s Office: Optimizing Care for Infants and Children

of hyperbilirubinemia in the newborn infant 35 or more weeks of gestation. Pediatrics 2004;114:297–316. 35. World Health Organization Child Growth Standards. www.who.int/childgrowth/standards/technical_report/en/ index.html (accessed February 9, 2013). 36. World Health Organization. International Code of Market- ing of Breast-milk Substitutes. 1981. www.unicef.org/ nutrition/?les/nutrition_code_english.pdf (accessed Febru- ary 9, 2013). 37. BunikM. Breastfeeding Telephone Triage and Advice.American Academy (...) of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL, 2012. 38. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Business Case for Breastfeeding. www.womenshealth .gov/breastfeeding/government-in-action/business-case-for- breastfeeding/ (accessed February 9, 2013). 39. Ortiz J, McGilligan K, Kelly P. Duration of breast milk ex- pression among working mothers enrolled in an employer- sponsored lactation program. Pediatr Nurs 2004;30:111–119. 40. World Health Assembly. The Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding

2013 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

229. Thematic review of deaths of children and young people through drowning

Board Nicola Davies, Community Incident Reduction Manager (Wales, South and Severn), Royal National Lifeboat Institution Sandra Dredge, Senior Nurse, Community Child Health, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board Dr Malcolm Gajraj, Consultant Paediatric Intensivist, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board Dr Lindsay Groves, Named Doctor Safeguarding Children, Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board Karen Jones, Head of Community Safety, Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service Paul Jones (...) , Detective Sergeant, Dyfed- Powys Police Dr Joanne McCarthy, Specialty Registrar in Public Health, Public Health Wales Dr Leesa Parkinson, Consultant in Paediatric and Adult Emergency Medicine, Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board Dawn Pinder, Section Head, Leisure Operations, Cardiff Council Prof Jo Sibert, Emeritus Professor of Child Health, Cardiff University Ian Smith, Interim Named Professional Safeguarding Children, Welsh Ambulance Services NHS Trust David Walker, Leisure Safety Manager, Royal

2016 Public Health Wales Observatory Evidence Service

230. Breastfeeding the Hypotonic Infant

and bottle feedings in infants with congenital heart disease. J Pediatr Nurs 1995;10:360–364. 12. Mizuno K, Ueda A. Development of sucking behavior in infants with Down’s syndrome. Acta Paediatr 2001;90: 1384–1388. 13. Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, 2nd edition; Report of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. US Preventive Services Task Force, Washington, DC. US Department of Health and Human Services. 1996. Available at www.ncbi. nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK15430/ (accessed January 4, 2016). 14 (...) , which can increase breastfeeding dif?culties. Premature infants also struggle with small and underdeveloped oral structures and dif?culties with suck– swallow coordination. 3 The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the World Health Organization, and other international organizations recommend that all infants should be breastfed unless there is a medical contraindica- tion. 4,5 It is particularly important that infants and young children with hypotonia, including

2016 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

231. Is infant arterial stiffness associated with maternal blood pressure in pregnancy? Findings from a UK birth cohort (Baby VIP study). Full Text available with Trip Pro

health and Iron in Pregnancy (Baby VIP) study is a birth cohort which measured PWV and heart rate (HR) in 284 babies in Leeds, UK, at 2-6 weeks after birth. Maternal BP measurements at 12 and 36 weeks gestation was collected from antenatal clinical records. Multivariable linear regression models assessed associations between maternal systolic and diastolic BPs, and BP change from booking to 36 weeks, with infant PWV adjusting for covariables at both mother and baby level.There was no evidence (...) of an association between infant PWV and maternal systolic BP at booking (adjusted regression coefficient -0.01 m/s per 10mmHg, 95% CI -0.11, 0.14, p = 0.84) or at 36 weeks (adjusted regression coefficient 0.00 m/s per 10mmHg, 95% CI -0.12, 0.11, p = 0.95). Change between 12 and 36 weeks gestation of more than 30 mmHg in systolic BP or 15 mmHg in diastolic BP was also not associated with infant PWV. There was an inverse relationship between infant HR and infant PWV (regression coefficient -0.14 m/s per 10 bpm

2018 PLoS ONE

232. Desk guide for diagnosis and management of TB in children - Asia

-resistant tuberculo- sis (MDR-TB) in children. Lead author Stephen M. Graham International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, France; and Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne Department of Paediatrics, Australia.7 Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of illness and death in children, especially in TB endemic countries The diagnosis of TB can be made in most children in an outpatient setting based on careful clinical assessment Contact history is a very (...) Extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) is also common and presentation varies with age Important to always consider Age and nutritional status Risk factors for TB infection: history of contact with a TB patient Risk factors for TB disease: young age, HIV-infected, malnourished, recent measles, recent contact Most TB cases occur in children less than 5 years of age The younger the child, the more likely to identify a close contact with TB disease TB disease can be more severe and of rapid onset in infants

2016 International Union Against TB and Lung Disease

233. Desk guide for diagnosis and management of TB in children - Africa

-resistant tuberculo- sis (MDR-TB) in children. Lead author Stephen M. Graham International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, France; and Centre for International Child Health, University of Melbourne Department of Paediatrics, Australia.7 Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) is an important cause of illness and death in children, especially in TB endemic countries The diagnosis of TB can be made in most children in an outpatient setting based on careful clinical assessment Contact history is a very (...) Extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) is also common and presentation varies with age Important to always consider Age and nutritional status Risk factors for TB infection: history of contact with a TB patient Risk factors for TB disease: young age, HIV-infected, malnourished, recent measles, recent contact Most TB cases occur in children less than 5 years of age The younger the child, the more likely to identify a close contact with TB disease TB disease can be more severe and of rapid onset in infants

2016 International Union Against TB and Lung Disease

234. Development and Assessment of an E-learning Course on Pediatric Cardiology Basics Full Text available with Trip Pro

Development and Assessment of an E-learning Course on Pediatric Cardiology Basics Early detection of congenital heart disease is a worldwide problem. This is more critical in developing countries, where shortage of professional specialists and structural health care problems are a constant. E-learning has the potential to improve capacity, by overcoming distance barriers and by its ability to adapt to the reduced time of health professionals.The study aimed to develop an e-learning pediatric (...) cardiology basics course and evaluate its pedagogical impact and user satisfaction.The sample consisted of 62 health professionals, including doctors, nurses, and medical students, from 20 hospitals linked via a telemedicine network in Northeast Brazil. The course was developed using Moodle (Modular Object Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment; Moodle Pty Ltd, Perth, Australia) and contents adapted from a book on this topic. Pedagogical impact evaluation used a pre and posttest approach. User

2017 JMIR medical education

235. NASPGHAN Clinical Report: Surveillance, Diagnosis, and Prevention of Infectious Diseases in Pediatric Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Receiving Tumor Necrosis Factor - alpha Inhibitors

of recommendation. Tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) is central to macrophage and phagosome activation, recruitment of neutrophils and macro- phages, differentiation of monocytes, formation and maintenance of granulomas, and modulation of the inflammatory process. It is Received July 31, 2015; accepted March 1, 2016. From the Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Host Defense Program, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, the y Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Weill Cornell Medical (...) Center, New York, NY, the z Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Children’s Medical Center Dallas, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX, the § Cohen Children’s Medical Center, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Lake Success, NY, the jj Pediatric Gastroenterology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and the # Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Address correspondence

2016 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

236. Brief Resolved Unexplained Events (Formerly Apparent Life-Threatening Events) and Evaluation of Lower-Risk Infants

for CNS imaging Exclusions None Strength Weak recommendation (based on low quality of evidence) Key references , 2B. Clinicians Should Obtain an Assessment of Social Risk Factors To Detect Child Abuse in Infants Presenting With a Lower-Risk BRUE (Grade C, Moderate Recommendation) Aggregate Evidence Quality Grade C Benefits Identification of child abuse May benefit the safety of other children in the home May identify other social risk factors and needs and help connect caregivers with appropriate (...) evaluations, include caregiver-fabricated illness (formally known as Münchausen by proxy), smothering, and poisoning. Children who have experienced child abuse, most notably abusive head trauma, may present with a BRUE. Four studies reported a low incidence (0.54%–2.5%) of abusive head trauma in infants presenting to the emergency department with an ALTE. , , , If only those patients meeting lower-risk BRUE criteria were included, the incidence of abusive head trauma would have been <0.3%. Although

2016 American Academy of Pediatrics

237. Teaching kids to assess goopy health claims

Teaching kids to assess goopy health claims Teaching kids to assess goopy health claims - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By December 8, 2016 // In this blog for our #UnderstandingEvidence series, Matt Oxman talks about the Informed Health Choices project, which helps people sort the wheat from the chaff of evidence about treatment effects, starting with school children. Evidently Cochrane makes evidence accessible, but so does Gwyneth Paltrow on her blog Goop. The difference (...) version of the primary school resources. (Matt Oxman/Informed Health Choices project) In 2014, we began developing the first resources, targeting Ugandan 10-year-olds and their parents, respectively. For the kids, we have made a combination textbook and comic book, with supplemental materials including an exercise book and a guide for teachers using the materials in their classrooms. For the parents, we have produced a podcast, including a theme song. The resources cover concepts

2016 Evidently Cochrane

238. Use diverse children’s books to bridge our empathy gap

Use diverse children’s books to bridge our empathy gap Use diverse children's books to bridge our empathy gap Use diverse children’s books to bridge our empathy gap | | December 20, 2016 115 Shares When was the last time your child read a book featuring someone different from them? When did they last read a book about an African American girl celebrating her birthday, a Mexican American girl celebrating her quinceañera, or a Jewish American boy celebrating his bar mitzvah? What about a book (...) featuring Chinese American, Native American, Indian American or Muslim children? Think of the last few books you read to your children. Chances are, they feature white families and white children. Ask yourself: Are you raising tolerant children? This bruising election season uncovered the deep layers of intolerance that exist in our country. How do we heal and become a society where differences breed acceptance and not intolerance? How do we build foundations based on racial and religious understanding

2016 KevinMD blog

239. Pediatric Books

and Sparrow (2006) Touchponts, Addison-Wesley Ferber (2006) Solve your child's sleep problems Leach (2010) Your Baby and Child (to Age 5), Knopf (2009) AAP Birth to age 5, Bantam Wyckoff (2002) without shouting or Bender (1996) Keep your Kids from Driving You Crazy Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Pediatric Books." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (...) Pediatric Books Pediatric Books Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Pediatric Books Pediatric Books Aka: Pediatric Books

2015 FP Notebook

240. Peripheral venous cannulation of children

into a peripheral vein ( ). While the insertion of a cannula is a routine event for health care professionals (HCP), many children and families associate it with dramatic events and serious illness. Cannulation can be both traumatic and painful for the child and stressful for the family. They will require support and encouragement to deal with the procedure ( ). The implications of cannulation should not be underestimated. The introduction of a foreign body into the vein is an extraordinary intervention (...) products. Every HCP must undertake a yearly update to demonstrate competency and fulfill professional development requirements. This is assessed through an e-learning pack and practical assessment. M edical staff should have their competency assessed and documented during their general paediatric training. If no assessment was undertaken or they feel an update is required the practice educator in their clinical area can arrange this. Planning and preparation – child and family Explain the entire

2014 Publication 1593

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