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201. A Prospective Randomised Control Study: Reduction of Children's Pain Expectation Using a Picture Book during Blood Withdrawal. (Abstract)

A Prospective Randomised Control Study: Reduction of Children's Pain Expectation Using a Picture Book during Blood Withdrawal. Blood drawings are very painful and stressful for children. In a prospective control group study we investigated if using a picture book could reduce the children's pain expectation. In addition, the children's pain experience and the observed pain behaviour was monitored.Block-randomization were used and 120 children at the age of 6-12 years who were visiting (...) (ES=0.56) using the picture book. Children who received no local anaesthesia reported that they felt less pain during blood drawing after reading the picture book. The few children with local anaesthesia reported no benefit from the picture book. The observed use of local anaesthesia was very heterogeneous.The results recommend the usage of this picture book in everyday practice, if the use of local anaesthesia could not be used in an appropriate way.© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

2013 Klinische Pädiatrie Controlled trial quality: uncertain

202. Evaluation of a Primary Prevention Program for Anxiety Disorders Using Story Books with Children Aged 9-12 Years. (Abstract)

Evaluation of a Primary Prevention Program for Anxiety Disorders Using Story Books with Children Aged 9-12 Years. This article reports the results of a study evaluating a book-supported primary prevention program "Dominique's Handy Tricks" for anxiety disorders in children aged 9-12 years. This cognitive-behavioural program is delivered using a combination of storybooks and workshop sessions. The originality of the program comes from the use of storybooks that were not developed specifically (...) for anxiety management. Every session is based on a story describing characters facing common stressors and how they manage to cope with their daily problems. In our randomized control trial with 46 children, participation in the program led to a significant improvement in coping skills, perceived self-efficacy, anxiety sensitivity, as well as in symptoms of anxiety and fear. The theoretical and practical elements underlying the delivery of this primary prevention program are described.It is suggested

2013 The journal of primary prevention

203. A medication diary-book for pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Indonesia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A medication diary-book for pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Indonesia. Event-free survival of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in Yogyakarta, Indonesia was low (20%). The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a medication diary-book on the treatment outcome of childhood ALL.A randomized study was conducted with 109 pediatric patients with ALL in a pediatric oncology center in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Both intervention (...) and control groups received a structured parental education program and donated chemotherapy. The intervention group received a medication diary-book to remind parents and families to take oral chemotherapy and present for scheduled appointments or admissions. Event-free survival estimate (EFS) at 3 years was assessed.Among pediatric patients with ALL with highly educated mothers (senior high school or higher), the EFS-estimate at 3 years of the intervention group was significantly higher than the EFS

2013 Pediatric blood & cancer Controlled trial quality: uncertain

204. Honey for coughs in children with URTI

of age. It has not been tested for cough in this population and there are concerns about a risk of botulism from some honey products. Adverse effects Botulism has been reported in children younger than 12 months of age after consuming honey; hence honey is contraindicated in this age group. Availability Honey is relatively inexpensive compared with medicinal products. It can be purchased at any supermarket or health store. Description 0.5–2 teaspoons (2.5–10 g) of honey is given to the child (...) Honey for coughs in children with URTI RACGP - Honey and cough in children with URTI Search Become a student member today for free and be part of the RACGP community A career in general practice Starting the GP journey Enrolments for the 2019.1 OSCE FRACGP exams closing 29 March 2019 Fellowship FRACGP exams Research Practice Experience Program is a self-directed education program designed to support non vocationally registered doctors on their pathway to RACGP Fellowship Fellowship

2014 Handbook of Non-Drug interventions (HANDI)

205. Behavioural interventions for infant sleep problems and maternal mood

the day and overnight. Register via . Grading NHMRC Level 1 evidence References Hiscock H, Wake M. . BMJ , 2002;324(7345): 1062–5. Hiscock H, Bayer J, Gold L, Hampton A, Ukoumunne O, Wake M. . Arch Dis Child , 2007;92: 952–8. Price A, Wake M, Ukoumunne O, Hiscock H. . Pediatrics , 2012;130: 643–51. Consumer resources Raising Children Network, Baby Center, Royal Children’s Hospital Avi Sadeh, a researcher and author on infant sleep, FAQ about Controlled Crying - download below Acknowledgements (...) affect a child’s cognitive development. Adverse effects Behavioural sleep techniques have no marked long-lasting effects (positive or negative) on children. Availability Behavioural sleep interventions can be delivered in a primary care setting by GPs or practice nurses. Training is required (refer to ). Description Parents attend two or three private sessions with a healthcare professional trained in infant sleep intervention. Session 1: Education and choice of intervention Discuss normal sleep

2014 Handbook of Non-Drug interventions (HANDI)

206. Behavioural interventions for infant sleep problems and maternal mood

the day and overnight. Register via . Grading NHMRC Level 1 evidence References Hiscock H, Wake M. . BMJ , 2002;324(7345): 1062–5. Hiscock H, Bayer J, Gold L, Hampton A, Ukoumunne O, Wake M. . Arch Dis Child , 2007;92: 952–8. Price A, Wake M, Ukoumunne O, Hiscock H. . Pediatrics , 2012;130: 643–51. Consumer resources Raising Children Network, Baby Center, Royal Children’s Hospital Avi Sadeh, a researcher and author on infant sleep, FAQ about Controlled Crying - download below Acknowledgements (...) affect a child’s cognitive development. Adverse effects Behavioural sleep techniques have no marked long-lasting effects (positive or negative) on children. Availability Behavioural sleep interventions can be delivered in a primary care setting by GPs or practice nurses. Training is required (refer to ). Description Parents attend two or three private sessions with a healthcare professional trained in infant sleep intervention. Session 1: Education and choice of intervention Discuss normal sleep

2014 Handbook of Non-Drug interventions (HANDI)

207. Review shows that Icelandic society is taking firmer steps to tackle the diverse forms of child abuse and neglect that its children are exposed to Full Text available with Trip Pro

Review shows that Icelandic society is taking firmer steps to tackle the diverse forms of child abuse and neglect that its children are exposed to This review examined and summarised the research published on child abuse in Iceland, which was mainly in the country's native language, to make the findings more accessible to English speakers. It specifically focused on child rearing and the physical, emotional and sexual abuse, neglect and intrafamilial conflicts suffered by children at the hands (...) of their parents and other carers.The review drew on published research, books and reports and compared the findings with Nordic research and global estimates of child abuse.Qualitative and quantitative research revealed that the prevalence of different forms of child abuse, child neglect and intra-familial conflicts in Iceland was similar to, or higher than, global and Nordic estimates. Younger respondents reported less physical abuse than older respondents, but higher levels of emotional abuse. Legislation

2018 Acta paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992)

208. Effects of Experiential Learning on Vegetable Intake in Preschool Children

Food Preferences Health Behavior Diet Habit Child Behavior Behavioral: Narrative Behavioral: Experiential Not Applicable Detailed Description: The aim of this study is to test the efficacy of providing experience of a target novel vegetable within the context of an interactive story time to increase intake of the target novel vegetable in preschool aged children (aged 2-5 years). In particular, the study will assess whether these strategies are effective to encourage intake of an unfamiliar (...) Effects of Experiential Learning on Vegetable Intake in Preschool Children Effects of Experiential Learning on Vegetable Intake in Preschool Children - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Effects

2018 Clinical Trials

209. Fit 5 Kids Screen Time Reduction Curriculum for Latino Preschoolers

Research Center Baylor College of Medicine USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center Information provided by (Responsible Party): Jason Mendoza, MD, MPH, Seattle Children's Hospital Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Childhood obesity and metabolic risk are at record high levels in the US, and Latino children are at very high risk. This project will test an intervention called Fit 5 Kids, designed for Latino preschoolers to decrease their screen time in order to promote physical (...) a school year (8-months) H1) Fit 5 Kids will decrease children's screen time, BMI z-scores and dietary energy intake, and increase fruit/vegetable intake, skin carotenoids, and moderate/vigorous physical activity (MVPA) compared to controls SA2) To examine mediators and moderators associated with reducing Latino preschoolers' screen time H2) Parents' outcome expectations, self-efficacy, and TV parenting practices will mediate the relationship between Fit 5 Kids and changes to preschoolers' screen time

2018 Clinical Trials

210. Using Baby Books to Promote Maternal and Child Health

/Pediatric Anticipatory Guidance Behavioral: Book provision Not Applicable Detailed Description: This study tests the efficacy of embedding educational information (i.e., pediatric anticipatory guidance) into baby books that first-time mothers read to their infants. This 3-group longitudinal study recruited first-time mothers in their third trimester of pregnancy, randomly assigned them to conditions, and followed them until the child was 18 months of age. One group received educational baby books (...) , another group was given the same illustrated books with non-educational text, and the third group was not given any books. Thus, the effects of educational reading could be parsed from the effects of reading alone. The study aimed to test whether embedding pediatric anticipatory guidance in picture books is an effective method for increasing maternal knowledge of child development, parenting strategies, and safety practices, improving parenting beliefs and attitudes (e.g., parenting efficacy

2014 Clinical Trials

211. The relationship between teacher qualification and the quality of the early childhood education and care environment Full Text available with Trip Pro

research projects support the notion that high‐quality (compared with low‐quality) ECEC is more likely to support optimal child social, emotional and cognitive development, promote growth experiences (including nurturing and attachment), and facilitate positive interaction among teachers and children ( ; ). These positive developmental and social experiences, as well as a supportive and nurturing environment, in the early years (e.g., preschool years) are commonly translated into improved school (...) to avoid vague and nonspecific operational definitions of quality (e.g., any “all‐encompassing” term), early childhood researchers have commonly conceptualized and disaggregated the multidimensional ECEC quality into two measurable interrelated components: (1) structural quality ‐ this refers to structural indicators such as child‐to‐staff ratios and caregiver characteristics such as teacher formal education; and (2) process quality ‐ including learning opportunities available to the children

2017 Campbell Collaboration

212. The Tools of the Mind curriculum for improving self?regulation in early childhood: a sytematic review Full Text available with Trip Pro

intervention in preschool contexts holds considerable promise for improving a child's development trajectory. As Heckman noted, early “skill begets skill; learning begets learning” ( , p. 3). Consequently, small self‐regulatory differences in early childhood can be magnified to progressively larger differences over time ( ; O'shaughnessy, Lane, Gresham, & ). Thus, early childhood emerges as an especially critical period in which to intervene. Research about the challenges of self‐regulation promotion (...) further underscores the need for early interventions. A nationally representative survey indicated that 46% of American kindergarten teachers reported at least half of their students as routinely struggling with self‐regulation ( ). In fact, American preschool students are three times more likely to be expelled for unmanageable behavior than primary and secondary students ( ). Based on these statistics, it seems that many early childhood educational settings are neither meeting children's needs nor

2017 Campbell Collaboration

213. Child and Adolescent Asthma Guidelines

), only with viral illnesses, but no symptoms in the interval between—give a trial of ICS for a minimum of eight weeks. If there is a positive response, these children should then be labelled as ‘preschool asthma’, if not, the treatment should be stopped and the child should remain labelled as ‘frequent preschool wheeze’. An alternative term sometimes used is ‘frequent episodic (viral) wheeze’. Preschool asthma Those with frequent symptoms typical for asthma during and in the interval between viral (...) . • Inhaler technique should be routinely assessed wherever possible and training provided as part of self-man- agement education. Asthma action plans Goal: All children with asthma are provided with an asthma action plan • To assist in self-management of childhood asthma, consider all of the child’s regular caregivers and environ- ments in preparing and distributing the action plan. • Asthma action plans that are symp- tom-based, rather than PEF-based, are preferred in children, although some older

2017 Asthma and Respiratory Foundation NZ

214. Preschool predictors of later reading comprehension ability: a systematic review Full Text available with Trip Pro

, SES, language, country) explain any observed differences between the studies included? To answer our research questions, we have summarized available research on the topic by conducting a meta‐analysis. Methods Criteria for considering studies for this review Types of studies The studies included in this review are longitudinal observational non‐experimental studies that follow a group of children from preschool age into school age. In addition, business‐as‐usual controls in experimental studies (...) to include a study of mainly monolingual typical children (i.e., not simply included because of a special group affiliation)? Response options: Yes/No/Can't tell 3) Does the reference appear to have data from both preschool and school? Response options: Yes/No/Can't tell 4) Does the reference appear to include data on at least one of the predictors and on later reading comprehension? Response options: Yes/No/Can't tell 5) Should this reference be included at this stage? Response options: Yes/No If any

2017 Campbell Collaboration

215. Spot the Diagnosis! The Case of the Dropsical Child Full Text available with Trip Pro

condition. 1 The only feature of this child that is inconsistent with the diagnosis is his well-nourished appearance. Generally, infants and children with cyanotic heart lesions experience failure to thrive. One speculation for this discrepancy is the artistic preference of the time, which includes depicting their subjects as healthy and robust. 1 What is the pathophysiology of the condition? VSD is an acyanotic heart defect at first. Oxygenated blood from the left ventricle is shunted to the right (...) Spot the Diagnosis! The Case of the Dropsical Child Spot the Diagnosis! The Case of the Dropsical Child - CanadiEM Spot the Diagnosis! The Case of the Dropsical Child In , , by Leah Zhao September 13, 2018 In this Spot the Diagnosis! post, we have the case of an ill looking child, brought in for healing by a worried mother. Through the symbolic ox, the haloed saint is identified as St Luke, a physician in the New Testament. (Note the book at his lap entitled “Hippocrates”.) (Can you also see St

2018 CandiEM

216. WHO recommendations on home-based records for maternal, newborn and child health

/10665/274286/ WHO-MCA-18.05-eng.pdfviii WHO recommendations on home-based records for maternal, newborn and child health Table 1. Recommendations on home-based records Recommendations 1. The use of home-based records, as a complement to facility-based records, is recommended for the care of pregnant women, mothers, newborns and children, to improve care-seeking behaviours, male involvement and support in the household, maternal and child home care practices, infant and child feeding (...) in their design and the information they document. They can be: maternal home-based records that include identifying information, antenatal notes, and care during childbirth and after birth; vaccination-only cards which record vaccination history; expanded vaccination-plus cards which provide a record of vaccinations and health care, growth and development and illness management for newborns and children. Another type of home- based record is child health books, which record vaccinations, health care, growth

2018 World Health Organisation Guidelines

217. Breastfeeding-Friendly Physician?s Office: Optimizing Care for Infants and Children

of hyperbilirubinemia in the newborn infant 35 or more weeks of gestation. Pediatrics 2004;114:297–316. 35. World Health Organization Child Growth Standards. www.who.int/childgrowth/standards/technical_report/en/ index.html (accessed February 9, 2013). 36. World Health Organization. International Code of Market- ing of Breast-milk Substitutes. 1981. www.unicef.org/ nutrition/?les/nutrition_code_english.pdf (accessed Febru- ary 9, 2013). 37. BunikM. Breastfeeding Telephone Triage and Advice.American Academy (...) of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL, 2012. 38. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Business Case for Breastfeeding. www.womenshealth .gov/breastfeeding/government-in-action/business-case-for- breastfeeding/ (accessed February 9, 2013). 39. Ortiz J, McGilligan K, Kelly P. Duration of breast milk ex- pression among working mothers enrolled in an employer- sponsored lactation program. Pediatr Nurs 2004;30:111–119. 40. World Health Assembly. The Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding

2013 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

218. Thematic review of deaths of children and young people through drowning

Board Nicola Davies, Community Incident Reduction Manager (Wales, South and Severn), Royal National Lifeboat Institution Sandra Dredge, Senior Nurse, Community Child Health, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board Dr Malcolm Gajraj, Consultant Paediatric Intensivist, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board Dr Lindsay Groves, Named Doctor Safeguarding Children, Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board Karen Jones, Head of Community Safety, Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service Paul Jones (...) , Detective Sergeant, Dyfed- Powys Police Dr Joanne McCarthy, Specialty Registrar in Public Health, Public Health Wales Dr Leesa Parkinson, Consultant in Paediatric and Adult Emergency Medicine, Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board Dawn Pinder, Section Head, Leisure Operations, Cardiff Council Prof Jo Sibert, Emeritus Professor of Child Health, Cardiff University Ian Smith, Interim Named Professional Safeguarding Children, Welsh Ambulance Services NHS Trust David Walker, Leisure Safety Manager, Royal

2016 Public Health Wales Observatory Evidence Service

219. Breastfeeding the Hypotonic Infant

and bottle feedings in infants with congenital heart disease. J Pediatr Nurs 1995;10:360–364. 12. Mizuno K, Ueda A. Development of sucking behavior in infants with Down’s syndrome. Acta Paediatr 2001;90: 1384–1388. 13. Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, 2nd edition; Report of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. US Preventive Services Task Force, Washington, DC. US Department of Health and Human Services. 1996. Available at www.ncbi. nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK15430/ (accessed January 4, 2016). 14 (...) , which can increase breastfeeding dif?culties. Premature infants also struggle with small and underdeveloped oral structures and dif?culties with suck– swallow coordination. 3 The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the World Health Organization, and other international organizations recommend that all infants should be breastfed unless there is a medical contraindica- tion. 4,5 It is particularly important that infants and young children with hypotonia, including

2016 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

220. Is infant arterial stiffness associated with maternal blood pressure in pregnancy? Findings from a UK birth cohort (Baby VIP study). Full Text available with Trip Pro

health and Iron in Pregnancy (Baby VIP) study is a birth cohort which measured PWV and heart rate (HR) in 284 babies in Leeds, UK, at 2-6 weeks after birth. Maternal BP measurements at 12 and 36 weeks gestation was collected from antenatal clinical records. Multivariable linear regression models assessed associations between maternal systolic and diastolic BPs, and BP change from booking to 36 weeks, with infant PWV adjusting for covariables at both mother and baby level.There was no evidence (...) of an association between infant PWV and maternal systolic BP at booking (adjusted regression coefficient -0.01 m/s per 10mmHg, 95% CI -0.11, 0.14, p = 0.84) or at 36 weeks (adjusted regression coefficient 0.00 m/s per 10mmHg, 95% CI -0.12, 0.11, p = 0.95). Change between 12 and 36 weeks gestation of more than 30 mmHg in systolic BP or 15 mmHg in diastolic BP was also not associated with infant PWV. There was an inverse relationship between infant HR and infant PWV (regression coefficient -0.14 m/s per 10 bpm

2018 PLoS ONE

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