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Pediatric Auditory Screening

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21. An analysis of hearing screening test results in 2291 premature infants of Chinese population. (Abstract)

University. The newborn hearing screening (NHS) procedure was performed in all preterm infants by automated auditory brainstem response (AABR). Infants who failed the primary hearing screening received a second screening at 42 days after birth. Infants who failed both tests were referred to a tertiary audiology center for diagnostic confirmation and management before 6 months of age. The final diagnosis for referred infants was obtained by telephone follow-up. The risk factors associated with failure (...) An analysis of hearing screening test results in 2291 premature infants of Chinese population. The aim of this study was to analyze the hearing screening program among preterm infants as well as to identify risk factors associated with failing primary newborn hearing screening.The retrospectively selected population included all preterm infants who had primary hearing screening in a neonatal ward from January 1st, 2013 to December 31st, 2015 at West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan

2017 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

22. Guidance for Screening for Uveitis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)

a clinical priority and should occur as soon as possible and no later than six weeks from referral. 2. Symptomatic patients or patients suspected of cataracts or synechiae should be seen within a week of referral. 3. Difficult examinations: if the patient is uncooperative at initial screening, or for an urgent symptomatic examination in a young child an examination under anaesthetic should be considered. 4. Parent information: parents and carers of children with JIA need to be fully informed about (...) Guidance for Screening for Uveitis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Guid ance for Screening for Uveitis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) June 2018 Aim of the screening programme To reduce the incidence of visual impairment among children and young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) by early detection through screening allowing for early intervention. Background The prevalence of uveitis in JIA is approximately 8-30%, but in a young oligo-articular onset group (i.e

2018 British Society for Rheumatology

23. Cochlear implants for children and adults with severe to profound deafness

that the auditory nerve was provided with stimulation early in a child's development because it became less sensitive to stimulation as the child became older. Hence, failure to stimulate the auditory nerve early impaired the development of central pathways necessary for the appreciation and understanding of sound. The committee was persuaded on the basis of consultee comments that the potential benefits of bilateral auditory stimulation would apply to both prelingual and postlingual children with severe (...) not receive adequate benefit from acoustic hearing aids, as defined in 1.5: children adults who are blind or who have other disabilities that increase their reliance on auditory stimuli as a primary sensory mechanism for spatial awareness. Acquisition of cochlear implant systems for bilateral implantation should be at the lowest cost and include currently available discounts on list prices equivalent to 40% or more for the second implant. [2009] [2009] 1.3 Sequential bilateral cochlear implantation

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Technology Appraisals

24. Newborn Hearing Screening in Prematurity: Fate of Screening Failures and Auditory Maturation. (Abstract)

Newborn Hearing Screening in Prematurity: Fate of Screening Failures and Auditory Maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify delayed auditory maturation and the fate of premature infants who failed the newborn hearing screening (NHS) in neonatal intensive care unit.A total of 1375 neonates underwent NHS using the transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) in a tertiary hospital between 2007 and 2010 according to the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing guidelines. In addition (...) , a structured telephone survey was given to caregivers of infants who were lost to follow-up NHS. Auditory steady-state response (ASSR) threshold and the threshold change in diagnostic test failures were analysed.Among the 1375 NICU babies, 344 (25.0%) babies, 111 (9.7%) babies and 64 (4.6%) babies failed to pass the first TEOAE, second TEOAE and diagnostic ASSR, respectively. However, at the age of about 5 years, 12 (0.9%) infants showed permanent hearing loss (PHL). The ASSR threshold improved from 69.0

2016 Clinical Otolaryngology

25. Validation of the Screening Test for Auditory Processing (STAP) on school-aged children. (Abstract)

Validation of the Screening Test for Auditory Processing (STAP) on school-aged children. The present study focussed on validating the Screening Test for Auditory Processing (STAP) that contains four subsections: speech-in-noise, dichotic consonant vowel, gap detection and auditory memory. The sensitivity and specificity were ascertained by comparing the results of the screening test with that of diagnostic tests for auditory processing.The STAP was administered on 500 school going children (...) in the age range of 8-13 years. These consisted of 141 children who were found at-risk on the Screening Checklist for Auditory Processing (SCAP). Diagnostic APD tests (speech-in-noise, dichotic CV, gap detection and auditory memory) were administered on 152 of the children referred and/or passed on the screening procedures.The results from the STAP indicated that the auditory memory subsection of the STAP was the most affected followed by dichotic CV and speech-in-noise. Gap detection was the least

2014 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

26. Detection Rates of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials at Different Sensation Levels in Infants with Sensory/Neural Hearing Loss and Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder Full Text available with Trip Pro

Detection Rates of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials at Different Sensation Levels in Infants with Sensory/Neural Hearing Loss and Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder With the introduction of newborn hearing screening, infants are being diagnosed with hearing loss during the first few months of life. For infants with a sensory/neural hearing loss (SNHL), the audiogram can be estimated objectively using auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing and hearing aids prescribed accordingly (...) . However, for infants with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) due to the abnormal/absent ABR waveforms, alternative measures of auditory function are needed to assess the need for amplification and evaluate whether aided benefit has been achieved. Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) are used to assess aided benefit in infants with hearing loss; however, there is insufficient information regarding the relationship between stimulus audibility and CAEP detection rates. It is also

2016 Seminars in hearing

27. Guidelines for diagnosing and managing pediatric concussion

and managing recovery at home, school and play. The target population is every child/adolescent aged 5 to 18 years who has or may have sustained a concussion in the previous month. These guidelines do not apply to children under 5 years. Diagnosing concussion in children under five years is controversial because it relies heavily on the child’s ability to recognize and/or communicate his/her symptoms. Most preschoolers have not developed that capacity yet. As well, there are no validated tools for this age (...) care professionals. • Example: Emergency Department physicians, family physicians, pediatricians, nurse- practitioners, occupational and physical therapists, neuropsychologists. How: Provide verbal information. • Children/adolescents should not consume alcohol and/or recreational drugs at all— especially after a concussion. Chapter: Recommendations Guidelines for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion 12 Tipsheet / List of Tools Why: • To prevent the child/adolescent from self-medicating

2019 CPG Infobase

28. Pediatric Post–Cardiac Arrest Care: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

patients who received CPR. According to information from the AHA Get With The Guidelines–Resuscitation IHCA registry and the Kids’ Inpatient Database, an estimated 6000 infants and children develop IHCA annually. Risk-adjusted rates of ROSC increased from 42.9% in 2000 to 81.2% in 2009, and risk-adjusted rates of survival to discharge improved from 14.3% in 2000 to 43.4% in 2009 without an increase in unfavorable neurological outcome. Notably, with an emphasis on detection and treatment of prearrest (...) that if there were limited or no available pediatric post–cardiac arrest data, the group would summarize data from studies of adult cardiac arrest and, if available, data derived from critically ill or injured children. Editorials, letters, and case reports were excluded. Large prospective trials and randomized controlled trials were highlighted, and case series and low-quality evidence were summarized. The draft sections were edited by the chair and 2 senior writing group members (A.d.C. and M.F.H.). A draft

2019 American Heart Association

29. The Utility and Practice of Electrodiagnostic Testing in the Pediatric Population: An AANEM Consensus Statement

in children. J Pediatr Orthop B 2005;14(1):42-45. 8. Potulska-Chromik A, Lipowska M, Gawel M, Ryniewicz B, Maj E, Kostera-Pruszczyk A. Carpal tunnel syndrome in children. J Child Neurol 2014;29(2):227-231. 9. Cruz Martinez A, Arpa J. Carpal tunnel syndrome in childhood: study of 6 cases. Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol 1998;109(4):304-308. 10. Davis L, Vedanarayanan VV. Carpal tunnel syndrome in children. Pediatr Neurol 2014;50(1):57-59. 11. Deymeer F, Jones HR, Jr. Pediatric median mononeuropathies (...) yield of these tests in infants, children, and adolescents. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.Pediatric EDX Statement, page Keywords Electromyography; Electrodiagnostic medicine; Neuromuscular disorders; Pediatric; Infants; Children; Adolescents Introduction Electrodiagnostic (EDX) testing has been used to evaluate children with suspected neuromuscular disorders for decades. With the widespread adoption of genetic testing in the 1990s and 2000s, questions arose regarding

2019 American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine

30. Living Guideline for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion

Hospital • Link: Understanding and Managing Concussion in Youth: 3rd Edition Concussion Kit: Montreal Children’s Hospital Level of Evidence: B 24 Guideline for Diagnosing and Managing Pediatric Concussion – Recommendations / Tools Domain 3: Medical Follow-up and Management of Prolonged Symptoms Introduction: A medical follow-up is recommended if a child/adolescent is experiencing post-concussion symptoms, has not completed the return-to-school or return-to-activity/sport stages, or experiences any (...) such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen may be recommended to treat acute headache. Advise on limiting the use of these medications to less than 15 days a month and avoiding “around-the-clock” dosing to prevent overuse or rebound headaches (i.e., advise that children/adolescents avoid using over the counter medications at regular scheduled times throughout the day). 2.6 At present, there is limited evidence to support the administration of intravenous medication to treat acute headaches in pediatric concussion patients

2019 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

31. Sensitivity of the Automated Auditory Brainstem Response in Neonatal Hearing Screening. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sensitivity of the Automated Auditory Brainstem Response in Neonatal Hearing Screening. In a 2-stage neonatal hearing screening protocol, if an infant fails the first-stage abstract screening with an otoacoustic emissions test, an automated auditory brainstem response (ABR)test is performed. The purpose of this study was to estimate the rate of hearing loss detected byfirst-stage otoacoustic emissions test but missed by second-stage automated ABR testing.The data of 17 078 infants who were born (...) at Lis Maternity Hospital between January 2013 and June 2014 were reviewed. Infants who failed screening with a transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) test and infants admitted to the NICU for more than 5 days underwent screening with an automated ABR test at 45 decibel hearing level (dB HL). All infants who failed screening with TEOAE were referred to a follow-up evaluation at the hearing clinic.Twenty-four percent of the infants who failed the TEOAE and passed the automated ABR hearing

2015 Pediatrics

32. Improving universal newborn hearing screening outcomes by conducting it with thyroid screening. (Abstract)

Improving universal newborn hearing screening outcomes by conducting it with thyroid screening. One of the most important factors that can improve hearing screening indicators is testing infants after 48 h of birth. The neonatal thyroid screening program is done during the third to fifth day after birth in many countries. So this screening is done at the appropriate time for hearing screening. The aim of the present study was to evaluate hearing screening outcomes (the referral rate, false (...) positive rate, and positive predictive value) conducted with the thyroid screening at the healthcare centers and compare the results with hospital before discharge the infant.This was a prospective exploratory cohort study. The study population included all the newborns at a hospital (group 1) and newborns who were referred to healthcare centers for thyroid screening (group 2), except for infants with risk factors, from March 2012 to December 2017. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE

2018 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

33. A comprehensive systematic review of interventions for auditory verbal hallucinations in children and young people

A comprehensive systematic review of interventions for auditory verbal hallucinations in children and young people Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence (...) : Organisation web address: Timing and effect measures Timing and effect measures Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Context and rationale Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Inclusion criteria: Exclusion criteria: Example: Screening will be performed in two phases, namely initial screening based on title and abstract, followed

2017 PROSPERO

34. Pediatric Auditory Screening

Pediatric Auditory Screening Aka: Pediatric Auditory Screening , Pediatric Hearing Screening II. Epidemiology sensorineural hearing deficiency Newborns: 1-5 per 1000 births Age 24 Months: 1 per 25 children (20-50 decibel loss) Identify prior to age 6 months old Significant benefit in language development III. Causes: Infants (Sensorineural hearing deficit) No risk factors in 50% of infants In utero infection (CMV, ) Low birth weight (<1500 g) (exchange levels) Low s (<5 at 1 min, <6 at 5 min) Persistent (...) causing loss of consciousness s s (potentiated by s) Chemotherapeutic agents IV. Causes: Older children (Conductive hearing deficit) (Most common) Occlusive foreign body Ossicle disruption V. Screening Tools Infants Evoked s (EOAE) Sensitivity 50-100%, 82% Easily performed Cost: inexpensive ($1 per exam) Auditory Evoked Responses (ABR) Sensitivity 94%, 89% Cost: $30 per exam Requires EEG type electrode Response to auditory stimulation Pre-school (Ages 3-5 years) Pure tone Fails if >20 decibel loss

2015 FP Notebook

35. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment in Children and Adolescents

and that psychostimulants can be effective for children 6–12 years of age. • Atomoxetine had slightly higher gastrointestinal effects than methylphenidate. • Cognitive behavioral therapy may improve ADHD symptoms among children 7–17 years of age. • Child or parent training improved ADHD symptoms among children 7–17 years of age but did not change academic performance. • Omega-3/6 supplementation made no difference in ADHD symptoms. • Future studies are needed to evaluate diagnosis, monitoring, and long-term outcomes (...) Boston Children’s Hospital Boston, MA Coleen Boyle, Ph.D., M.S.Hyg. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA Teka Dempson National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health Durham, NC Theodore Ganiats, M.D. University of Miami Miami, FL Laurence Greenhill, M.D. Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY Aaron Lopata, M.D., M.P.P. Health Resources and Services Administration Maternal and Child Health Bureau Rockville, MD Doris Lotz, M.D., M.P.H. Chief Medical Officer New

2018 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

36. Aided Language Stimulation Leading to Functional Communication Gains in Children Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication

modeling used with children working on verbal expression. The model takes into consideration the interests and abilities of the child, while incorporating both a visual and verbal model to demonstrate the communication of messages. Aided language modeling is easier to implement, increases positive parent perception, and increases the overall quality of parent-child interactions compared to traditional models. Definitions for terms marked with * and Abbreviations may be found in an Abbreviations (...) success, directly correlating to a positive increase in the child’s functional communication (Romski, 2011 [4a]; Sennott, 2016 [1b]). Giving children a modality to communicate other than speech likely reduces the pressure that parents feel in their inability to successfully communicate with their children. Many parents surveyed felt more satisfied with the way their children were communicating post-intervention, that their children had made great strides in expressing themselves

2018 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

37. Evaluation of the localization auditory screening test in children 6-18 months of age. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Evaluation of the localization auditory screening test in children 6-18 months of age. The present paper is a report of a project to develop an automated auditory screening test for infants six to 18 months of age. The first year of the project was devoted to developing equipment and test procedures; the second year was concerned with testing the effectiveness of the equipment and procedures on an actual population of six to 18 month old infants. Two-hundred and fifty infants were screened (...) auditorily as part of a county health department child development clinic. The pass/fail results of the screening test were evaluated in terms of physical and developmental examination following the screening and by means of a case review of the child's previous history. The results indicate that the procedure under investigation can be used to differentiate the normal hearing infant from the infant with possible hearing problems. It is shown by the test environment in which this study was conducted

1978 American Journal of Public Health

38. Auditory noise increases the allocation of attention to the mouth, and the eyes pay the price: An eye-tracking study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Auditory noise increases the allocation of attention to the mouth, and the eyes pay the price: An eye-tracking study. We investigated the effect of auditory noise added to speech on patterns of looking at faces in 40 toddlers. We hypothesised that noise would increase the difficulty of processing speech, making children allocate more attention to the mouth of the speaker to gain visual speech cues from mouth movements. We also hypothesised that this shift would cause a decrease in fixation time (...) to the eyes, potentially decreasing the ability to monitor gaze. We found that adding noise increased the number of fixations to the mouth area, at the price of a decreased number of fixations to the eyes. Thus, to our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating a mouth-eyes trade-off between attention allocated to social cues coming from the eyes and linguistic cues coming from the mouth. We also found that children with higher word recognition proficiency and higher average pupil response had

2018 PLoS ONE

39. Initial Results of a Safety and Feasibility Study of Auditory Brainstem Implantation in Congenitally Deaf Children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Initial Results of a Safety and Feasibility Study of Auditory Brainstem Implantation in Congenitally Deaf Children. To determine the safety and feasibility of the auditory brainstem implant (ABI) in congenitally deaf children with cochlear aplasia and/or cochlear nerve deficiency.Phase I feasibility clinical trial of surgery in 10 children, ages 2 to 5 years, over a 3-year period.Tertiary children's hospital and university-based pediatric speech/language/hearing center.ABI implantation (...) and postsurgical programming.The primary outcome measure is the number and type of adverse events during ABI surgery and postsurgical follow-up, including behavioral mapping of the device. The secondary outcome measure is access to and early integration of sound.To date, nine children are enrolled. Five children have successfully undergone ABI surgery and postoperative behavioral programming. Three children were screen failures, and one child is currently undergoing candidacy evaluation. Expected adverse

2016 Otology and Neurotology

40. High frequency of OTOF mutations in Chinese infants with congenital auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. Full Text available with Trip Pro

High frequency of OTOF mutations in Chinese infants with congenital auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder. Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) is one of the most common diseases leading to hearing and speech communication barriers in infants and young children. The OTOF gene is the first gene identified for autosomal recessive non-syndromic ANSD, and patients with OTOF mutations have shown marked improvement of auditory functions from the cochlear implantation, but the true involvement (...) of OTOF mutations in Chinese ANSD patients is still unknown which precludes the effective management of this disease. Here, we investigated the contribution of OTOF mutations to congenital ANSD patients in China. In all, 37 infants and young Children with ANSD were screened for all the exons of OTOF gene, of them 34 patients had no neonatal risk factors who were considered as congenital ANSD. The clinical manifestation and audiometric features were also investigated and compared in patients

2016 Clinical Genetics

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