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Patient Education in Skin Disorders

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1. Patient Education in Skin Disorders

Patient Education in Skin Disorders Patient Education in Skin Disorders Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Patient (...) Education in Skin Disorders Patient Education in Skin Disorders Aka: Patient Education in Skin Disorders , Dermatology Patient Education II. Dermatology Patient Education (AAD) Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Patient Education in Skin Disorders." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in General About FPnotebook.com

2018 FP Notebook

2. Detection of Skin Epithelial Barrier in Patients With Allergic Skin Disorders

Detection of Skin Epithelial Barrier in Patients With Allergic Skin Disorders Detection of Skin Epithelial Barrier in Patients With Allergic Skin Disorders - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more (...) . Detection of Skin Epithelial Barrier in Patients With Allergic Skin Disorders The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03581747 Recruitment Status : Recruiting First Posted : July 10, 2018 Last Update Posted

2018 Clinical Trials

3. Comparing Teaching Methods on Skin Disorders Using Standardized Patients Dressed in Moulage vs Paper Cases (PubMed)

Comparing Teaching Methods on Skin Disorders Using Standardized Patients Dressed in Moulage vs Paper Cases Objective. To determine whether using standardized patients dressed in moulage improves pharmacy students' ability to assess skin disorders compared to using picture-based paper cases. To determine pharmacy student preferences when learning assessment of skin disorders through these two educational methods. Methods. Faculty members investigated student assessments of drug-induced skin (...) differences in knowledge scores related to skin disorders were found after laboratory or 3 weeks later when comparing the two educational methods. However, survey results suggested student preferences for using standardized patients dressed in moulage for drug-induced skin disorders. No significant differences were found for contact dermatitis cases. Conclusion. Using standardized patients dressed in moulage did not improve pharmacy students' ability to assess skin disorders compared to using picture

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2018 American journal of pharmaceutical education

4. High Prevalence of Personality Disorders in Skin-restricted Lupus Patients. (PubMed)

High Prevalence of Personality Disorders in Skin-restricted Lupus Patients. Psychiatric and personality disorders have been extensively documented in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the prevalence of personality disorders in skin-restricted lupus (SRL) patients remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of personality disorders in SRL outpatients and to examine the associated factors. We evaluated 60 SRL outpatients and 118 controls matched (...) for sex, age and education level. On the basis of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire 4+, 38% of patients vs 20% of controls fulfilled the criteria for at least one personality disorder (OR 2.2 [95% CI 1.01-4.6], p = 0.048). Only one patient with a personality disorder had specialised mental health care. Late lupus onset and more frequent past treatments by thalidomide were associated factors. This study evidences a high prevalence of personality disorders in SRL patients and shows that most SRL

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2017 Acta Dermato-Venereologica

5. High prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with skin-restricted lupus: a case-control study. (PubMed)

High prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with skin-restricted lupus: a case-control study. Psychiatric disorders have been extensively documented in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with skin-restricted lupus (SRL) remains unknown, although SRL is more common than SLE.To assess current and lifetime prevalence of Axis I psychiatric disorders among outpatients with SRL and to examine the factors associated (...) with psychiatric disorders among such patients.A multicentre case-control study involving outpatients with SRL and controls matched for sex, age and education level. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used for psychiatric evaluation.We evaluated 75 patients and 150 controls. Of these, 49% of patients vs. 13% of controls fulfilled the criteria for at least one current psychiatric disorder (P < 0·001). The following disorders were significantly more frequent among patients than controls

2016 British Journal of Dermatology

6. A structural MRI study of excoriation (skin-picking) disorder and its relationship to clinical severity (PubMed)

A structural MRI study of excoriation (skin-picking) disorder and its relationship to clinical severity Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) shares symptomology with other obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Few studies, however, have examined the neurological profile of patients with SPD. This study examined differences in cortical thickness and basal ganglia structural volumes between 20 individuals with SPD and 16 healthy controls using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI (...) positively with increased cortical thickness in the left insula, and skin picking severity correlated negatively with cortical thickness in the left supramarginal gyrus and a region encompassing the right inferior parietal, right temporal and right supramarginal gyrus. This study suggests similarities and differences exist in symptomology between SPD and the other obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Additional neuroimaging research is needed to better delineate the underlying neurobiology

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2017 Psychiatry research

7. Oral retinoid medicines: revised and simplified pregnancy prevention educational materials for healthcare professionals and women

favourable. The review recommended that educational materials for patients and healthcare professionals about pregnancy prevention measures should be simplified and made consistent and warnings about neuropsychiatric disorders harmonised across oral retinoid medicines (see ). Review of the effectiveness of pregnancy prevention measures Revised and simplified educational materials Women and girls of childbearing potential taking oral retinoids to treat dermatological conditions must be supported (...) depression, and anxiety have been reported with oral retinoids. The limitations of the available data did not allow the review to establish a clear causal association between risk of neuropsychiatric disorders and use of oral retinoids. However, patients with severe skin conditions may be more likely to develop neuropsychiatric disorders due to the nature of the disease. The review therefore concluded that the prescribing information for oral retinoids should include a warning to ensure patients

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update

8. Nonpharmacologic Versus Pharmacologic Treatment of Adult Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians

Nonpharmacologic Versus Pharmacologic Treatment of Adult Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians Nonpharmacologic Versus Pharmacologic Treatment of Adults With MDD | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians '); } '); })(); Sign in below to access your subscription for full content INDIVIDUAL SIGN IN | You will be directed to acponline.org to register and create your Annals account INSTITUTIONAL SIGN (...) IN | | Subscribe to Annals of Internal Medicine . You will be directed to acponline.org to complete your purchase. Search Clinical Guidelines | 1 March 2016 Nonpharmacologic Versus Pharmacologic Treatment of Adult Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians Free Amir Qaseem, MD, PhD, MHA; Michael J. Barry, MD; Devan Kansagara, MD, MCR; for the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians Amir Qaseem, MD, PhD, MHA From

2016 American College of Physicians

9. Later school start times for supporting the education, health and well-being of high school students

Later school start times for supporting the education, health and well-being of high school students A Campbell Systematic Review 2017:15 Education Coordinating Group Robert Marx, Emily E Tanner-Smith, Colleen M Davison, Lee-Anne Ufholz, John Freeman, Ravi Shankar, Lisa Newton, Robert S Brown, Alyssa S Parpia, Ioana Cozma, Shawn Hendrikx Later school start times for supporting the education, health, and well-being of high school students: a systematic review Published: December 2017 Search (...) executed: February 2016The Campbell Library comprises: • Systematic reviews (titles, protocols and reviews) • Policies and Guidelines Series • Methods Series Go to the library to download these resources, at: www.campbellcollaboration.org/library/ Better evidence for a better worldColophon Title Later school start times for supporting the education, health, and well-being of high school students Authors Robert Marx 1 , Emily E Tanner-Smith 2 , Colleen M Davison 3 , Lee-Anne Ufholz 4 , John Freeman 5

2017 Campbell Collaboration

10. Does vitamin B3 (nicotinamide) prevent non-melanoma skin cancer?

-melanoma skin cancers (basal and squamous cell carcinomas). Other outcomes: number of new BCCs, SCCs, and actinic keratoses Internal validity: are the trial results valid? Randomised patient assignment? Yes . The randomisation method is described in the supplemental protocol document available from the NEJM website. Randomisation was performed centrally by the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, and participants were allocated to groups, stratified by baseline skin cancer count, gender, and study site (...) . Groups similar at the start? Yes . The groups were very similar (see Table 1 from the paper) [1]. Groups treated equally apart from assigned treatment? Yes . All patients accounted for? Yes . Relatively few participants who dropped out and the analysis was conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Measures objective? Or patients and clinicians kept blinded? Yes/Probably . This primary outcome measure (histologically confirmed skin cancers) is arguably objective. Both clinicians and participants were

2018 Morsels of Evidence

11. Does vitamin B3 (nicotinamide) prevent non-melanoma skin cancer?

-melanoma skin cancers (basal and squamous cell carcinomas). Other outcomes: number of new BCCs, SCCs, and actinic keratoses Internal validity: are the trial results valid? Randomised patient assignment? Yes . The randomisation method is described in the supplemental protocol document available from the NEJM website. Randomisation was performed centrally by the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, and participants were allocated to groups, stratified by baseline skin cancer count, gender, and study site (...) . Groups similar at the start? Yes . The groups were very similar (see Table 1 from the paper) [1]. Groups treated equally apart from assigned treatment? Yes . All patients accounted for? Yes . Relatively few participants who dropped out and the analysis was conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Measures objective? Or patients and clinicians kept blinded? Yes/Probably . This primary outcome measure (histologically confirmed skin cancers) is arguably objective. Both clinicians and participants were

2018 Morsels of Evidence

12. Mexiletine (Namuscla) - treat symptoms of myotonia (muscle stiffness) in patients with non-dystrophic myotonic disorders

Mexiletine (Namuscla) - treat symptoms of myotonia (muscle stiffness) in patients with non-dystrophic myotonic disorders 30 Churchill Place ? Canary Wharf ? London E14 5EU ? United Kingdom An agency of the European Union Telephone +44 (0)20 3660 6000 Facsimile +44 (0)20 3660 5555 Send a question via our website www.ema.europa.eu/contact © European Medicines Agency, 2019. Reproduction is authorised provided the source is acknowledged. EMA/750331/2018 EMEA/H/C/004584 Namuscla (mexiletine (...) ) An overview of Namuscla and why it is authorised in the EU What is Namuscla and what is it used for? Namuscla is a medicine used to treat symptoms of myotonia (muscle stiffness) in patients with non- dystrophic myotonic disorders, a group of inherited muscle disorders. Non-dystrophic means no muscle wasting occurs in patients affected by the condition. Patients with non-dystrophic myotonic disorders experience muscle stiffness and pain because their muscles are slow to relax after contraction. Myotonic

2019 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

13. Managing opioid use disorder in primary care: PEER simplified guideline

of comorbidities in OUD; and the best method of diagnosing OUD in patients taking opioids chronically. Managing opioid use disorder in primary care PEER simplified guideline Christina Korownyk MD CCFP Danielle Perry Joey Ton PharmD Michael R. Kolber MD CCFP MSc Scott Garrison MD CCFP PhD Betsy Thomas BScPharm G. Michael Allan MD CCFP Cheryl Bateman PSW Raquel de Queiroz NP Dorcas Kennedy MD CCFP FCFP Wiplove Lamba MD FRCPC Dip ABAM Jazmin Marlinga MD CCFP(AM) Tally Mogus MD CCFP(AM) Tony Nickonchuk BScPharm (...) for the following comorbidities in patients with OUD: chronic pain, acute pain, insomnia, anxiety, and ADHD (no recommendation, insufficient evidence) ADHD—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, OUD—opioid use disorder, POMI—Prescription Opioid Misuse Index, RCT—randomized controlled trial. *In RCTs, primary care might have included team-based care, support and training available, affiliation with substance misuse clinics, or 24-h pager support. Training and supports will vary by practitioner, practice site

2019 CPG Infobase

14. Androgens in Women: Androgen mediated skin disease and patient evaluation (Part I). (PubMed)

cutaneous conditions in women, including acne, hirsutism, and female pattern hair loss (FPHL) - androgen mediated cutaneous disorders (AMCDs). However, the role of androgens in the pathophysiology of these diseases is complicated and incompletely understood. In the first article in this Continuing Medical Education series, we discuss the role of the skin in androgen production as well as the impact of androgens on the skin in women. Specifically, we review the necessary, but insufficient role (...) Androgens in Women: Androgen mediated skin disease and patient evaluation (Part I). Androgens are produced throughout the body in steroid-producing organs, such as the adrenal glands and ovaries, as well as in other tissues, like the skin. Several androgens are found normally in women, including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S), testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and androstenedione. These androgens are essential in the development of several common

2018 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

15. Treatments for Basal Cell and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

of the aforementioned therapies, and watchful waiting. The choice of management strategy for an individual patient with a specific keratinocyte carcinoma is complex, and it is not clear how various therapeutic options perform relative to each other. In addition, interventions for treating skin cancers differ substantially in cost. 3, 8-10 The objective of this systematic review is to comprehensively synthesize information on the comparative effectiveness and safety of each of the above- mentioned therapeutic (...) strategies for both BCC and SCC. Key Questions The review addresses two Key Questions for adult patients with BCC or SCC of the skin. Each Key Question will be answered separately for BCC and SCC: Key Question 1: What is the comparative effectiveness of various interventions, overall and in subgroups of interest? Key Question 2: How do the adverse events associated with the various interventions compare overall and in subgroups of interest? Methods The Brown Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) conducted

2017 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

16. CRACKCast E137 – Skin Infections

, and surgical consultation. Emergency clinicians should be familiar with toxic shock syndromes and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, which are rare, life-threatening, skin infection–related syndromes. Lyme disease should be considered in endemic areas. For the management of most skin abscesses, antibiotics are not recommended. Adequate analgesia or sedation are essential to good patient care. There is debate about the necessity of wound culture and Gram staining. Current recommendations for the treatment (...) , trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and tetracyclines may not be effective for streptococci and are not recommended for cellulitis monotherapy. There is insufficient evidence to recommend measurement of the white blood cell count in patients with skin infections. Blood cultures are not necessary for the evaluation of skin infections, except with septic shock, necrotizing infections, immunocompromised, multifocal infections suggesting hematogenous seeding, infections complicating lymphedema, and perhaps facial

2017 CandiEM

17. Is an online skin cancer toolkit an effective way to educate primary care physicians about skin cancer diagnosis and referral? (PubMed)

Is an online skin cancer toolkit an effective way to educate primary care physicians about skin cancer diagnosis and referral? Skin disorders account for over 20% of GP consultations. Half of dermatology referrals to secondary care are for skin lesions, but only 12% of urgent skin cancer referrals are deemed appropriate. Suitably designed online learning resources may positively impact GP confidence in the recognition of skin cancer and improve patient outcomes.This study evaluated the impact (...) of a national, online, skin cancer recognition toolkit on GP confidence and knowledge in diagnosing skin cancers and referral behaviour to secondary care.The toolkit, consisting of a referral decision aid, lesion recognition resource, clinical cases and a quiz, was launched in March 2012. Website usage statistics and online focus groups were used to assess the usability of the website and perceived changes in behaviour. The impact of the toolkit was assessed using national skin cancer referral data, cross

2015 Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology

18. Patient Education in Skin Disorders

Patient Education in Skin Disorders Patient Education in Skin Disorders Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Patient (...) Education in Skin Disorders Patient Education in Skin Disorders Aka: Patient Education in Skin Disorders , Dermatology Patient Education II. Dermatology Patient Education (AAD) Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Patient Education in Skin Disorders." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Related Topics in General About FPnotebook.com

2015 FP Notebook

19. Treating Opioid Use Disorder During Pregnancy: Guideline Supplement

represent the view of the Pregnancy Supplement Committee, arrived at after careful consideration of the available scientific evidence and external expert peer review. When treating pregnant patients with opioid use disorder, health care professionals are expected to consider this guideline supplement alongside the recommendations articulated in A Guideline for the Clinical Management of Opioid Use Disorder. These guidelines should be considered and interpreted in the context of the individual needs (...) to pregnant individuals*. This guideline recognizes persisting misconceptions about pregnant people who use substances as a primary barrier to accessing treatment for opioid use disorder during pregnancy, and emphasises the need for a non-judgmental, trauma-informed and culturally safe approach to care that accommodates patients’ individual choices and circumstances. Within this framework, the present document recommends a holistic and integrated care plan with appropriate use of the full range

2018 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

20. Development of newborn screening connect (NBS connect): a self-reported patient registry and its role in improvement of care for patients with inherited metabolic disorders (PubMed)

metabolic disorders. Based on patient-reported data, future studies can be initiated to test hypotheses such as the relationship between PKU and skin conditions. Patient registries like NBS Connect can inform hypothesis-driven research, contributing to knowledge generation and following the current trend in moving from traditional medicine towards evidence-based practice. NBS Connect will help clinicians understand long-term outcomes of rare disorders, contributing to better patient care and quality (...) Development of newborn screening connect (NBS connect): a self-reported patient registry and its role in improvement of care for patients with inherited metabolic disorders Newborn Screening Connect (NBS Connect) is a web-based self-reported patient registry and resource for individuals and families affected by disorders included in the newborn screening panel. NBS Connect was launched in 2012 by Emory University after years of planning and grassroots work by professionals, consumers

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2017 Orphanet journal of rare diseases

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