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Parietal Lobe

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141. Occipital Lobe

is the one of five lobes of the cerebral hemisphere which occupies the posterior-most portion of the hemisphere. Anteriorly, it shares an arbitrary border with the parietal lobe and temporal lobe. Medially, it is bounded by the longitudinal cerebral fissure. Definition (NCI) The posterior part of the cerebral hemisphere. (MeSH) Definition (NCI_CDISC) The posterior part of the cerebral hemisphere. (MeSH) Definition (MSH) Posterior portion of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES responsible for processing visual (...) Occipital Lobe Occipital Lobe Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Occipital Lobe Occipital Lobe Aka: Occipital Lobe

2015 FP Notebook

142. Temporal Lobe

border shared with the occipital lobe. Definition (CHV) the lower lateral lobe of either cerebral hemisphere Definition (CHV) the lower lateral lobe of either cerebral hemisphere Definition (CHV) the lower lateral lobe of either cerebral hemisphere Definition (CHV) the lower lateral lobe of either cerebral hemisphere Definition (NCI_CDISC) Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere. (MSH2001) Definition (NCI) One of the cerebral lobes. It is located inferior to the frontal and parietal lobes (...) Temporal Lobe Temporal Lobe Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Temporal Lobe Temporal Lobe Aka: Temporal Lobe , Temporal

2015 FP Notebook

143. Frontal Lobe

window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: frontal lobe (C0016733) Definition (FMA) Frontal lobe is the anterior-most of five lobes of the cerebral hemisphere. It is bounded by the central sulcus on its posterior border and by the longitudinal cerebral fissure on its medial border. Definition (NCI) The part of the brain located anterior to the parietal lobes at the front of each cerebral hemisphere. Definition (NCI_CDISC) The part of the brain located anterior to the parietal lobes (...) Frontal Lobe Frontal Lobe Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Frontal Lobe Frontal Lobe Aka: Frontal Lobe , Cerebral

2015 FP Notebook

144. Frontal lobe connectivity and cognitive impairment in pediatric frontal lobe epilepsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

patterns in children with FLE remained relatively intact. Children with FLE complicated by cognitive impairment typically showed a decrease in frontal lobe connectivity. This decreased frontal lobe connectivity comprised both connections within the frontal lobe as well as connections from the frontal lobe to the parietal lobe, temporal lobe, cerebellum, and basal ganglia.Decreased functional frontal lobe connectivity is associated with cognitive impairment in pediatric FLE. The importance of impairment (...) Frontal lobe connectivity and cognitive impairment in pediatric frontal lobe epilepsy. Cognitive impairment is frequent in children with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), but its etiology is unknown. With functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we have explored the relationship between brain activation, functional connectivity, and cognitive functioning in a cohort of pediatric patients with FLE and healthy controls.Thirty-two children aged 8-13 years with FLE of unknown cause and 41 healthy

2012 Epilepsia

145. Task-Dependent Interaction between Parietal and Contralateral Primary Motor Cortex during Explicit versus Implicit Motor Imagery Full Text available with Trip Pro

Task-Dependent Interaction between Parietal and Contralateral Primary Motor Cortex during Explicit versus Implicit Motor Imagery Both mental rotation (MR) and motor imagery (MI) involve an internalization of movement within motor and parietal cortex. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) techniques allow for a task-dependent investigation of the interhemispheric interaction between these areas. We used image-guided dual-coil TMS to investigate interactions between right inferior parietal lobe

2012 PloS one

146. Towards an understanding of parietal mnemonic processes: some conceptual guideposts Full Text available with Trip Pro

Towards an understanding of parietal mnemonic processes: some conceptual guideposts The posterior parietal lobes have been implicated in a range of episodic memory retrieval tasks, but the nature of parietal contributions to remembering remains unclear. In an attempt to identify fruitful avenues of further research, several heuristic questions about parietal mnemonic activations are considered in light of recent empirical findings: Do such parietal activations reflect memory processes (...) , or their contents? Do they precede, follow, or co-occur with retrieval? What can we learn from their pattern of lateralization? Do they index access to episodic representations, or the feeling of remembering? Are parietal activations graded by memory strength, quantity of retrieved information, or the type of retrieval? How do memory-related activations map onto functional parcellation of parietal lobes suggested by other cognitive phenomena? Consideration of these questions can promote understanding

2012 Frontiers in integrative neuroscience

147. Parietal Contributions to Visual Working Memory Depend on Task Difficulty Full Text available with Trip Pro

capacity and WM task demands. We discuss these findings in terms of alternative WM strategies employed by low and high WM capacity individuals. We speculate that low WM capacity individuals do not recruit the posterior parietal lobe for WM tasks as efficiently as high WM capacity individuals. Consequently, tDCS provides greater benefit to individuals with high WM capacity. (...) Parietal Contributions to Visual Working Memory Depend on Task Difficulty The nature of parietal contributions to working memory (WM) remain poorly understood but of considerable interest. We previously reported that posterior parietal damage selectively impaired WM probed by recognition (Berryhill and Olson, 2008a). Recent studies provided support using a neuromodulatory technique, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the right parietal cortex (P4). These studies confirmed

2012 Frontiers in Psychiatry

148. Clinical evidence of parietal cortex dysfunction and correlation with extent of allodynia in CRPS type 1. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Clinical evidence of parietal cortex dysfunction and correlation with extent of allodynia in CRPS type 1. Unusual symptoms such as digit misidentification and neglect-like phenomena have been reported in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), which we hypothesized could be explained by parietal lobe dysfunction.Twenty-two patients with chronic CRPS attending an in-patient rehabilitation programme underwent standard neurological examination followed by clinical assessment of parietal lobe (...) function and detailed sensory testing.Fifteen (68%) patients had evidence of parietal lobe dysfunction. Six (27%) subjects failed six or more test categories and demonstrated new clinical signs consistent with their parietal testing impairments, which were impacting significantly on activities of daily living. A higher incidence was noted in subjects with >1 limb involvement, CRPS affecting the dominant side and in left-handed subjects. Eighteen patients (82%) had mechanical allodynia covering 3-57.5

2012 European Journal of Pain

149. Alteration of global workspace during loss of consciousness: A study of parietal seizures. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Alteration of global workspace during loss of consciousness: A study of parietal seizures. Loss of consciousness (LOC) in epileptic seizures has a strongly negative impact on quality of life. Recently, we showed that LOC occurring during temporal lobe seizures was correlated with a nonlinear increase of neural synchrony in associative--and particularly parietal--cortices. Whether these mechanisms might be observed in other types of seizures is unknown. This study aimed at investigating (...) the relationship between changes in synchrony and degree of LOC during parietal lobe epilepsy (PLE), a form of epilepsy in which seizures directly involve the parietal associative cortices.Ten patients undergoing stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) during presurgical evaluation of PLE were studied. The LOC intensity was scored using the Conscious Seizure Scale (CSS). For each studied seizure (n = 29), interdependencies between signals recorded from six brain regions were estimated as a function of time

2012 Epilepsia

150. High frequency rTMS over the left parietal lobule increases non-word reading accuracy. (Abstract)

High frequency rTMS over the left parietal lobule increases non-word reading accuracy. Increasing evidence in the literature supports the usefulness of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in studying reading processes. Two brain regions are primarily involved in phonological decoding: the left superior temporal gyrus (STG), which is associated with the auditory representation of spoken words, and the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL), which operates in phonological computation. This study

2012 Neuropsychologia Controlled trial quality: uncertain

151. Facilitating Associative Memory Via Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Medial Temporal Lobe

Facilitating Associative Memory Via Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Medial Temporal Lobe Facilitating Associative Memory Via Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Medial Temporal Lobe - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please (...) remove one or more studies before adding more. Facilitating Associative Memory Via Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Medial Temporal Lobe The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01599208 Recruitment Status : Withdrawn (no IRB) First Posted : May 15, 2012 Last Update Posted

2012 Clinical Trials

152. Changes in the default mode network in the prefrontal lobe, posterior cingulated cortex and hippocampus of heroin users Full Text available with Trip Pro

Changes in the default mode network in the prefrontal lobe, posterior cingulated cortex and hippocampus of heroin users The default mode network is associated with senior cognitive functions in humans. In this study, we performed independent component analysis of blood oxygenation signals from 14 heroin users and 13 matched normal controls in the resting state through functional MRI scans. Results showed that the default mode network was significantly activated in the prefrontal lobe, posterior (...) cingulated cortex and hippocampus of heroin users, and an enhanced activation signal was observed in the right inferior parietal lobule (P < 0.05, corrected for false discovery rate). Experimental findings indicate that the default mode network is altered in heroin users.

2012 Neural Regeneration Research

153. Interhemispheric temporal lobe connectivity predicts language impairment in adolescents born preterm. Full Text available with Trip Pro

with bilateral volume reductions in the ventral language pathway. However, the most significant volume reduction was detected in the posterior corpus callosum (splenium), which contains interhemispheric connections between the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes. Diffusion tractography showed that of the three groups of interhemispheric fibres within the splenium, only those connecting the temporal lobes were reduced. Crucially, we found that language impairment was only detectable if the anterior (...) Interhemispheric temporal lobe connectivity predicts language impairment in adolescents born preterm. Although language difficulties are common in children born prematurely, robust neuroanatomical correlates of these impairments remain to be established. This study investigated whether the greater prevalence of language problems in preterm (versus term-born) children might reflect injury to major intra- or interhemispheric white matter pathways connecting frontal and temporal language regions

2012 Brain

154. Spectral and spatial shifts of post-ictal slow waves in temporal lobe seizures. Full Text available with Trip Pro

. These results revealed that a widespread cortical network including temporal and fronto-parietal cortex is involved in abnormal slow-wave activity following temporal lobe seizures. The differential spectral and spatial shifts of post-ictal electroencephalography activity in simple partial, complex partial and secondarily generalized seizures suggest a possible connection between cortical slow waves and behavioural and cognitive changes in a human epilepsy model. (...) Spectral and spatial shifts of post-ictal slow waves in temporal lobe seizures. Temporal lobe seizures have a significant chance to induce impairment of normal brain functions. Even after the termination of ictal discharges, during the post-ictal period, loss of consciousness, decreased responsiveness or other cognitive dysfunctions can persist. Previous studies have found various anatomical and functional abnormalities accompanying temporal lobe seizures, including an abnormal elevation

2012 Brain

155. Brain structure and aging in chronic temporal lobe epilepsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

of cortical gray matter thickness, area, or volume in temporal (medial, lateral) and extratemporal lobes (frontal, parietal). Increasing chronologic age was associated with progressive changes in diverse cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions for both participants with epilepsy and controls. Age-accelerated changes in epilepsy participants were seen in selected areas (third and lateral ventricles), with largely comparable patterns of age-related change across other regions of interest.Extensive (...) Brain structure and aging in chronic temporal lobe epilepsy. To characterize differences in brain structure and their patterns of age-related change in individuals with chronic childhood/adolescent onset temporal lobe epilepsy compared with healthy controls.Subjects included participants with chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 55) of mean childhood/adolescent onset and healthy controls (n = 53), age 14-60 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies (1.5 T) were processed using

2012 Epilepsia

156. Psychopathology in children before and after surgery for extratemporal lobe epilepsy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Psychopathology in children before and after surgery for extratemporal lobe epilepsy. To establish the rates and types of psychiatric disorder in children before and after surgery for extratemporal epilepsy. Relationships between psychiatric morbidity and demographic/clinical variables were examined.A retrospective case note review of 71 children undergoing extratemporal focal resection for drug resistant epilepsy in a specialist epilepsy surgery programme between 1997 and 2008. Psychiatric (...) diagnoses were derived from pre- and postoperative assessments according to DSM-IV criteria.Seventy-one children (38 males, 33 females) were eligible for this study. Mean age (SD) at surgery was 9 (5) years. Frontal resections were performed in 73% of the children, parietal in 17%, and occipital in 10%. Mental health problems were present in 37 of 71 (52%) children pre- and/or postoperatively. A similar proportion of children had psychiatric diagnoses pre- and postoperatively: 31 of 71 (44%) and 32

2012 Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

157. Parietal Lobes in Schizophrenia: Do They Matter? Full Text available with Trip Pro

Parietal Lobes in Schizophrenia: Do They Matter? Objective. Despite observations that abnormal parietal lobe (PL) function is associated with psychotic-like experiences, our knowledge about the nature of PL involvement in schizophrenia is modest. The objective of this paper is to investigate the role of the PL in schizophrenia. Method. Medline databases were searched for English language publications using the following key words: parietal lobe, combined with schizophrenia, lesions, epilepsy (...) , cognition, rare genetic disorders, MRI, fMRI, PET, and SPECT, respectively, followed by cross-checking of references. Results. Imaging studies in childhood onset schizophrenia suggest that grey matter abnormalities start in parietal and occipital lobes and proceed to frontal regions. Although, the findings are inconsistent, several studies with patients at risk to develop schizophrenia indicate early changes in the PL. Conclusions. We want to propose that in a proportion of individuals with emerging

2011 Schizophrenia Research and Treatment

158. Neuronal Chains for Actions in the Parietal Lobe: A Computational Model Full Text available with Trip Pro

Neuronal Chains for Actions in the Parietal Lobe: A Computational Model The inferior part of the parietal lobe (IPL) is known to play a very important role in sensorimotor integration. Neurons in this region code goal-related motor acts performed with the mouth, with the hand and with the arm. It has been demonstrated that most IPL motor neurons coding a specific motor act (e.g., grasping) show markedly different activation patterns according to the final goal of the action sequence in which (...) the act is embedded (grasping for eating or grasping for placing). Some of these neurons (parietal mirror neurons) show a similar selectivity also during the observation of the same action sequences when executed by others. Thus, it appears that the neuronal response occurring during the execution and the observation of a specific grasping act codes not only the executed motor act, but also the agent's final goal (intention).In this work we present a biologically inspired neural network architecture

2011 PloS one

159. Recency Effects in the Inferior Parietal Lobe during Verbal Recognition Memory Full Text available with Trip Pro

Recency Effects in the Inferior Parietal Lobe during Verbal Recognition Memory The most recently encountered information is often most easily remembered in psychological tests of memory. Recent investigations of the neural basis of such "recency effects" have shown that activation in the lateral inferior parietal cortex (LIPC) tracks the recency of a probe item when subjects make recognition memory judgments. A key question regarding recency effects in the LIPC is whether they fundamentally (...) maintenance. We conclude with a discussion of two alternative explanations - the memory strength and "expectancy" hypotheses, respectively - of the parietal lobe recency effect.

2011 Frontiers in human neuroscience

160. Xenomelia: a new right parietal lobe syndrome. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Xenomelia: a new right parietal lobe syndrome. Damage to the right parietal lobe has long been associated with various disorders of body image. The authors have recently suggested that an unusual behavioural condition in which otherwise rational individuals desire the amputation of a healthy limb might also arise from right parietal dysfunction.Four subjects who desired the amputation of healthy legs (two right, one left and one, at first, bilateral and then left only) were recruited (...) for amputation. The authors introduce the term 'xenomelia' as a more appropriate name than apotemnophilia or body integrity identity disorder, for what appears to be an unrecognised right parietal lobe syndrome.

2011 Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

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