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Paresthesia Causes

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1. Assessment of paraesthesias

involve any portion of the body innervated by sensory or afferent nerve fibres. They may occur in isolation or in association with reduced or absent sensation. The symptoms usually occur spontaneously. Paraesthesias can be caused by a dysfunction or abnormality affecting any level of the somatosensory pathway. However, the most common causes affect peripheral sensory nerves. The somatosensory pathway Primary afferent or sensory nerve fibres originate as unmyelinated nerve endings in the epidermis (...) Assessment of paraesthesias Assessment of paraesthesias - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of paraesthesias Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Paraesthesias are abnormal sensory symptoms typically characterised as tingling, prickling, pins and needles, or burning sensations. They may be transient or persistent, limited in distribution or generalised, and may

2018 BMJ Best Practice

2. Assessment of paraesthesias

involve any portion of the body innervated by sensory or afferent nerve fibres. They may occur in isolation or in association with reduced or absent sensation. The symptoms usually occur spontaneously. Paraesthesias can be caused by a dysfunction or abnormality affecting any level of the somatosensory pathway. However, the most common causes affect peripheral sensory nerves. The somatosensory pathway Primary afferent or sensory nerve fibres originate as unmyelinated nerve endings in the epidermis (...) Assessment of paraesthesias Assessment of paraesthesias - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of paraesthesias Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: November 2018 Summary Paraesthesias are abnormal sensory symptoms typically characterised as tingling, prickling, pins and needles, or burning sensations. They may be transient or persistent, limited in distribution or generalised, and may

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Persistent lingual paresthesia caused by a displaced tooth fragment: a case report and literature review Full Text available with Trip Pro

Persistent lingual paresthesia caused by a displaced tooth fragment: a case report and literature review Accidental displacement of the third molar tooth or its fragment into the anatomical spaces is a rare but potentially serious complication. The most common sites of mandibular third molar displacement are the sublingual, submandibular, and pterygomandibular spaces. Removal of a displaced tooth or its fragments from these spaces may be difficult due to poor access and the vital structures

2017 Journal of the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

4. Paresthesia Causes

Paresthesia Causes Paresthesia Causes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Paresthesia Causes Paresthesia Causes Aka (...) : Paresthesia Causes From Related Chapters II. Causes: Central Nervous System III. Causes: Metabolic Porphyria IV. Causes: Entrapment Neuropathies Ulnar entrapment ( ) Lateral femoral cutaneous syndrome Peroneal palsy V. Causes: Inflammation Local Acute idiopathic polyneuritis Chronic relapsing VI. Causes: Connective Tissue Diseases Autoimmune VII. Causes: Toxins Heavy metal toxicity Industrial toxin exposure s Chronic overdosage VIII. Causes: Hereditary conditions Charcot-Marie- Denny-Brown's Syndrome

2018 FP Notebook

5. Slurring of Speech and Lip Paresthesia: Symptoms of Levodopa End of Dose Wearing Off in Parkinson's Disease Full Text available with Trip Pro

Slurring of Speech and Lip Paresthesia: Symptoms of Levodopa End of Dose Wearing Off in Parkinson's Disease The prolonged use of levodopa for treating Parkinson's disease is associated with motor and nonmotor complications. These include wearing-off, delayed-on, partial-on, no-on, and on-off phenomena. In the wearing-off effect, symptoms return before a patient's next scheduled dose of levodopa. Patients may present with motor, sensory, or autonomic fluctuations. In this report, we present (...) a female patient experiencing numbness of lips and slurred speech as a symptom of wearing-off effect. The major differential for sudden numbness of lips and slurred speech includes transient ischemic attacks. Therefore, it is imperative to identify the cause of these episodes so that appropriate treatment can be initiated. Our patient underwent extensive cardiac and neurological investigations, the findings of which were unremarkable. Her symptoms were likely due to levodopa wearing-off. Her condition

2018 Cureus

6. The Anatomical Nature of Dental Paresthesia: A Quick Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Anatomical Nature of Dental Paresthesia: A Quick Review Dental paresthesia is loss of sensation caused by maxillary or mandibular anesthetic administration before dental treatment. This review examines inferior alveolar block paresthesia symptoms, side effect and complications. Understanding the anatomy of the pterygomandibular fossa will help in understanding the nature and causes of the dental paresthesia. In this review, we review the anatomy of the region surrounding inferior alveolar

2018 The open dentistry journal

7. Paresthesia Free Spinal Cord Stimulation (PF-SCS)

Paresthesia Free Spinal Cord Stimulation (PF-SCS) Paresthesia Free Spinal Cord Stimulation (PF-SCS) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Paresthesia Free Spinal Cord Stimulation (PF-SCS (...) area in each subject. QST will be performed at Visit 1 and Visit 2. Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 68 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: Single (Participant) Masking Description: The participant and study staff will be blinded. The study physicians will not be blinded. Primary Purpose: Supportive Care Official Title: Effects of Paresthesia Free Spinal Cord

2018 Clinical Trials

8. Cutaneous paresthesia after internal plate fixation of clavicle fractures and underlying anatomical observations. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cutaneous paresthesia after internal plate fixation of clavicle fractures and underlying anatomical observations. To assess the clinical and anatomical causes of cutaneous paresthesia after internal fixation of clavicle fractures.This study included 135 patients who underwent internal fixation of clavicle fractures from May 2013 to June 2016 at the First and Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University. The incidence of postoperative supraclavicular nerve injury, the duration (...) of numbness, and improvements after plate removal were retrospectively analyzed. Seven human cadaver specimens were subsequently dissected to analyze the supraclavicular nerve and its relationship to numbness.Of the 135 patients who underwent internal fixation of clavicle fractures, 26 (19.3%) experienced postoperative cutaneous paresthesia, with 22 (16.3%) and 4 (2.8%) experiencing numbness and pain, respectively. The most intense numbness occurred during the first operative month. Of the 22 patients

2018 Medicine

9. Reversed Palmaris Longus Muscle Causing Volar Forearm Pain and Ulnar Nerve Paresthesia: A Case Report. (Abstract)

Reversed Palmaris Longus Muscle Causing Volar Forearm Pain and Ulnar Nerve Paresthesia: A Case Report. A case of volar forearm pain associated with ulnar nerve paresthesia caused by a reversed palmaris longus muscle is described. The patient, an otherwise healthy 46-year-old male laborer, presented after a previous unsuccessful forearm fasciotomy for complaints of exercise exacerbated pain affecting the volar forearm associated with paresthesia in the ulnar nerve distribution. A second

2016 Journal of Hand Surgery - American

10. Pyrethroids inhibit K2P channels and activate sensory neurons: basis of insecticide-induced paraesthesias. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pyrethroids inhibit K2P channels and activate sensory neurons: basis of insecticide-induced paraesthesias. Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used for pest control in agriculture or in human public health commonly as a topical treatment for scabies and head lice. Exposure to pyrethroids such as permethrin or tetramethrin (TM) causes sensory alterations such as transient pain, burning, stinging sensations, and paraesthesias. Despite the well-known effects of pyrethroids on sodium channels (...) by TRPA1 and/or TRPV1 agonists. This pyrethroid also activated and enhanced the excitability of peripheral saphenous nerve fibers. Pyrethroids produced a significant inhibition of native TRESK, TRAAK, TREK-1, and TREK-2 currents. Similar effects were found in transfected HEK293 cells. At the behavioral level, intradermal TM injection in the mouse paw produced nocifensive responses and caused mechanical allodynia, demonstrating that the effects seen on nociceptors in culture lead to pain-associated

2017 Pain

11. Paresthesia

PARESTHESIAS , PARAESTHESIA , PARESTHESIA , [D]Paraesthesia , [D]Paresthesia , Paresthesia , [D]Paresthesia (context-dependent category) , Paresthesias , Paraesthesias , Paresthesia [Disease/Finding] , abnormal sensation , parasthesia , paresthesias , parasthesias , paraesthesias , [D]Paresthesia (situation) , Paraesthesia (numbness/tingling) , [D]Paraesthesia (situation) , Paresthesia (numbness/tingling) , paresthesia , Parasthesia , Paraesthesia , Paresthesia (finding) , paraesthesia French PARESTHESIE (...) Paresthesia Paresthesia Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Paresthesia Paresthesia Aka: Paresthesia From Related Chapters

2018 FP Notebook

12. Letermovir (Prevymis) - to prevent illness caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) in adults having an allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant

Letermovir (Prevymis) - to prevent illness caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) in adults having an allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant 30 Churchill Place ? Canary Wharf ? London E14 5EU ? United Kingdom An agency of the European Union Telephone +44 (0)20 3660 6000 Facsimile +44 (0)20 3660 5520 Send a question via our website www.ema.europa.eu/contact © European Medicines Agency, 2018. Reproduction is authorised provided the source is acknowledged. 9 November 2017 EMA/CHMP/490007/2017 (...) population being CMV-seropositive in most countries. Similar to other herpesviruses, acute infection is generally followed by latent (dormant) infection. Among individuals with intact immune systems, reactivation of CMV infection is uncommon and is generally asymptomatic. However, CMV reactivation in immunocompromised patients, such as transplant recipients, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Annually, approximately 27,000 allogeneic HSCTs are performed worldwide (Gratwohl 2015): in 2014

2018 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

13. Four percent articaine administered for routine dental procedures may or may not increase the risk of paresthesia compared to 2% lidocaine

, is articaine administration more likely to cause paresthesia than lidocaine administration? Clinical Bottom Line Randomized controlled trials report similar rates of paresthesia between 2% lidocaine and 4% articaine. FDA adverse events reporting indicates a higher-than-expected frequency of paresthesia after dental anesthetic administration of both 4% articaine and 4% prilocaine. (See Comments on the CAT below) Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year (...) effects incidence was 22% for the articaine group and 20% for the lidocaine group. 4% of each group experienced adverse events. 18 of 882 patients in the articaine group, and 7 of 443 patients in the lidocaine group, reported hypesthesia or paresthesia. Evidence Search "Carticaine/adverse effects"[Mesh] AND ("paraesthesia"[All Fields] OR "paresthesia"[MeSH Terms] OR "paresthesia"[All Fields]) AND (Randomized Controlled Trial[ptyp] OR "Cohort Studies"[Mesh]) Comments on The Evidence The Garisto paper

2011 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

14. Arthralgias, fatigue, paresthesias and visceral pain: can joint hypermobility solve the puzzle? A case report. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Arthralgias, fatigue, paresthesias and visceral pain: can joint hypermobility solve the puzzle? A case report. Joint hypermobility syndrome describes a disorder in which musculoskeletal pain occurs in a generalized joint hypermobility substrate. The clinical picture comprises variable manifestations which involve mainly but not exclusively the musculoskeletal system, and evolve over the person's lifetime.Describing the case of a 20-year-old female with generalized arthro-myalgias, persistent (...) for arthralgias or depression for fatigue. These approaches gave rise to pharmacological or physical treatments which did not improve her quality of life in any way and in some instances worsened the situation. Pronounced joint hypermobility which led the patient to flex her joints excessively, causing subluxations in several districts, was the only sign overlooked.Exploring the patient's articular features in her clinical context led us to diagnose joint hypermobility syndrome, a complex and often ignored

2016 BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

15. Facial Diplegia with Paresthesia: An Uncommon Variant of Guillain–Barre Syndrome Full Text available with Trip Pro

side is affected within 30 days of involvement of first side. Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is a common cause of facial diplegia and almost half of these patients have facial nerve involvement during their illness. Facial Diplegia with Paresthesias (FDP) is a rare localized variant of GBS which is characterized by simultaneous facial diplegia, distal paresthesias and minimal or no motor weakness. We had a patient who presented with simultaneous weakness of bilateral facial nerve and paresthesias (...) Facial Diplegia with Paresthesia: An Uncommon Variant of Guillain–Barre Syndrome Facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a common medical problem and can be unilateral or bilateral. Unilateral facial palsy has an incidence of 25 per 100,000 population and most of them are idiopathic. However, facial diplegia or bilateral facial nerve palsy (B-FNP) is rare with an incidence of just 1 per 5,000,000 population and only 20 percent cases are idiopathic. Facial diplegia is said to be simultaneous if the other

2016 Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR

16. Paresthesia Causes

Paresthesia Causes Paresthesia Causes Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Paresthesia Causes Paresthesia Causes Aka (...) : Paresthesia Causes From Related Chapters II. Causes: Central Nervous System III. Causes: Metabolic Porphyria IV. Causes: Entrapment Neuropathies Ulnar entrapment ( ) Lateral femoral cutaneous syndrome Peroneal palsy V. Causes: Inflammation Local Acute idiopathic polyneuritis Chronic relapsing VI. Causes: Connective Tissue Diseases Autoimmune VII. Causes: Toxins Heavy metal toxicity Industrial toxin exposure s Chronic overdosage VIII. Causes: Hereditary conditions Charcot-Marie- Denny-Brown's Syndrome

2015 FP Notebook

17. Recurrent Spontaneous Paresthesia in the Upper Limb Could Be Due to Migraine: A Case Series. (Abstract)

Recurrent Spontaneous Paresthesia in the Upper Limb Could Be Due to Migraine: A Case Series. Transient neurologic dysfunction is a characteristic feature of migraine. About 20% of migraineurs may experience various symptoms in the absence of any headache at one time or another. Visual auras are the most common auras of migraine, and migraine is considered as the most common cause of transient vision loss in young patients. Sensory auras are the second most common migrainous auras. However (...) , the literature is silent for isolated sensory aura as a migraine equivalent. Herein we report 14 patients with recurrent episodic paresthesia in the limbs and other body parts. All patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of "typical aura without headache" of ICHD-3β. All patients were subjected to various investigations to rule out secondary causes. Ten patients received antimigraine drugs and all showed a positive response to therapy. Recurrent spontaneous paresthesia is quite common in the general

2015 Headache

18. Psychogenic Lingual Paresthesia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Psychogenic Lingual Paresthesia Oral paresthesias are common in clinical practice but they often go unnoticed and untreated. Psychogenic oral paresthesia is an unpleasant sensation of tingling or pricking or a feeling of swelling or burning, with spontaneous onset.It can result due to local, systemic, psychogenic or idiopathic causes. Among psychogenic causes; anxiety disorder and depression are common. We describe a 32-year-old patient presented with lingual paresthesia and features suggestive

2015 Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR

19. Dyspepsia - unidentified cause

Dyspepsia - unidentified cause Dyspepsia - unidentified cause - NICE CKS Share Dyspepsia - unidentified cause: Summary The term 'dyspepsia' is used to describe a complex of upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms which are typically present for four or more weeks, including upper abdominal pain or discomfort, heartburn, acid reflux, nausea and/or vomiting. Reported symptoms are a poor predictor of significant disease or underlying pathology. 'Uninvestigated' dyspepsia describes symptoms in people (...) who have not had an endoscopy. The most common causes of dyspepsia include: Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Peptic ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcers). Functional dyspepsia (non-ulcer dyspepsia) Dyspepsia symptoms are estimated to occur in about 40% of the population each year. Assessment of a person with unexplained dyspepsia should include: Asking about any alarm symptoms that may suggest a complication or other serious underlying pathology. Asking about lifestyle factors

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

20. A novel CASR mutation (p.Glu757Lys) causing autosomal dominant hypocalcaemia type 1 Full Text available with Trip Pro

A novel CASR mutation (p.Glu757Lys) causing autosomal dominant hypocalcaemia type 1 Autosomal dominant hypocalcaemia type 1 (ADH1) is a rare familial disorder characterised by low serum calcium and low or inappropriately normal serum PTH. It is caused by activating CASR mutations, which produces a left-shift in the set point for extracellular calcium. We describe an Australian family with a novel heterozygous missense mutation in CASR causing ADH1. Mild neuromuscular symptoms (paraesthesia (...) , carpopedal spasm) were present in most affected individuals and required treatment with calcium and calcitriol. Basal ganglia calcification was present in three out of four affected family members. This case highlights the importance of correctly identifying genetic causes of hypocalcaemia to allow for proper management and screening of family members. Learning points: •• ADH1 is a rare cause of hypoparathyroidism due to activating CASR mutations and is the mirror image of familial hypocalciuric

2018 Endocrinology, diabetes & metabolism case reports

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