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Pancoast Tumor

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81. 电视胸腔镜联合前/后径路在肺上沟瘤切除术中的临床应用 Full Text available with Trip Pro

电视胸腔镜联合前/后径路在肺上沟瘤切除术中的临床应用 The surgical resection for pancoast tumors remains challenging. There are only few reports explaining the use of VATS in the treatment of Pancoast tumors. The aim of this study is to assess whether the use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for the surgical treatment of Pancoast tumors was feasible and safe.Between Janunary 2010 and June 2013, ten patients who were diagnosed as Pancoast tumors were (...) of the involved chest wall were done in each patients. The average amount of blood loss was 308 mL and the average time of hospital stay was 14 d. Only one patient had postoperative pneumonia and recovered after use of antibiotics. There was none of severe postoperative complications. No patient developed a local recurrence or distant metastasis within twelve months.The use of VATS has practical value in the management of Pancoast tumors. It is useful to make an accurate extent of the resection of chest-wall

2015 Chinese Journal of Lung Cancer

82. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome - Neurogenic

to an infiltrative process or space-occupying mass (e.g. Pancoast tumor of the lung apex). B. ELECTRODIAGNOSTIC STUDIES (EDS) EDS abnormalities are required to objectively confirm the diagnosis of nTOS. Given the uncertainties in diagnostic assessment of nTOS, EDS should be obtained as soon as the diagnosis is considered. EDS may help gauge the severity of injury. 8-10 Importantly, EDS can help exclude conditions that may mimic nTOS, such as ulnar nerve entrapment or cervical radiculopathy. 11 EDS evidence (...) poor specificity for nTOS, and there is no substantial evidence that ASM can reliably confirm the diagnosis of nTOS. Therefore, ASM blocks conducted as a diagnostic tool for nTOS will not be authorized. X-rays of the chest may be useful to evaluate the possibility of an infiltrative process or space-occupying mass (e.g. Pancoast tumor of the lung apex) compressing the brachial plexus. V. TREATMENT Non-surgical therapy may be considered for cases in which a provisional diagnosis of nTOS has been

2010 Washington State Department of Labor and Industries

83. Diagnosis and Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy from Degenerative Disorders

to obtaining the same results. The ultimate judgment regarding any specific procedure or treatment is to be made by the physician and patient in light of all circumstances presented by the patient and the needs and resources particular to the locality or institution. vical radiculopathy from degenerative disorders would provide evidence regarding the natural his- tory of the disease in this patient population. Natural History References 1. Anderberg L, Annertz M, Persson L, Brandt L, Saveland H (...) . A population- based study from Rochester, Minnesota, 1976 through 1990. Brain. Apr 1994;117 ( Pt 2):325-335. 19. Rao R. Neck pain, cervical radiculopathy, and cervical my- elopathy: pathophysiology, natural history, and clinical evaluation. J Bone Joint Surg Am. Oct 2002;84-A(10):1872- 1881. 20. Ross JS, Modic MT, Masaryk TJ, Carter J, Marcus RE, Bohl- man H. Assessment of extradural degenerative disease with Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging: correlation with surgical and pathologic findings. AJR Am J

2010 North American Spine Society

84. Cisplatin/Irinotecan With Concurrent Radiation for Inoperable NSCLC

carcinomas. Patients with Pancoast tumors adjacent to a vertebral body are eligible as long as all gross disease can be encompassed in the radiation boost field. Pancoast tumor patients will be so-noted in the registry. Patients must be ≥ 18 years of age. Patients with Zubrod (ECOG) performance status ≤ 2. Adequate hematologic function defined as: ANC ≥ 1000/mm3, platelets ≥ 75,000/mm3, and hemoglobin ≥ 8 g/dL (prior to transfusions); adequate hepatic function defined as: total bilirubin ≤ 3.0 mg/dl (...) by (Responsible Party): Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: This is a prospective, single institution phase II study, whose primary objective is to estimate the median and three year survival rate of non-small lung cancer patients with Stage IIIA and IIIB intra-thoracic disease which is referred to as "locally advanced" non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Lung Neoplasms, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Drug: Irinotecan

2014 Clinical Trials

85. The Approach to the Painful Joint (Diagnosis)

Trauma Hemarthrosis Osteonecrosis Inflammatory processes associated with chronic monoarthritis include the following: Chronic infectious arthritis (see ) Crystalline synovitis (see ) Pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (RA; see ) Systemic rheumatic disease presenting with monoarticular involvement Noninflammatory processes associated with chronic monoarthritis include the following: Ischemic necrosis (see ) Hemarthrosis Paget disease involving the joint (see ) Metastatic tumor Synovial (...) polyarthritis include the following: Traumatic osteoarthritis (see ) Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy Amyloidosis (see ) Differential diagnoses for regional musculoskeletal pain Shoulder Referred pain may derive from cervical disorders, Pancoast tumor of the lung, subphrenic pathology, or entrapment neuropathies and brachial neuritis (see ). Rotator cuff tendinitis (see ) [ ] is inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons, arising acutely as a result of a recognizable injury (throwing) or insidiously

2014 eMedicine.com

86. Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (Diagnosis)

Dental extractions Cervical rib resection Fracture repair (Colles fracture) Arthroscopy Local disorders associated with CRPS 1 include the following: Nerve compression syndromes Arthritis Tissue ischemia Stenosing tenosynovitis Systemic disorders associated with CRPS 1 include the following: Myocardial infarction Stroke Pancoast tumor Pancreatic cancer Herpes zoster Previous Next: Epidemiology Frequency In the United States, an estimated 5% of patients who experience trauma to the upper extremity (...) or ischaemic origin. NICE. Available at . Accessed: September 26, 2014. [Guideline] Perez RS, Zollinger PE, Dijkstra PU, Thomassen-Hilgersom IL, Zuurmond WW, Rosenbrand KC, et al. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1. BMC Neurol . 2010 Mar 31. 10:20. . . Midbari A, Suzan E, Adler T, Melamed E, Norman D, Vulfsons S, et al. Amputation in patients with complex regional pain syndrome: a comparative study between amputees and non-amputees with intractable disease. Bone Joint J

2014 eMedicine.com

87. Horner Syndrome (Diagnosis)

that may give rise to Horner syndrome include the following: Pancoast tumor (tumor in the apex of the lung, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma) Birth trauma with injury to lower brachial plexus [ ] Cervical rib Aneurysm or dissection of the aorta Lesions of the subclavian or common carotid artery Central venous catheterization Trauma or surgical injury (eg, due to radical neck dissection, thyroidectomy, [ ] carotid angiography, radiofrequency tonsil ablation, [ ] chiropractic manipulation (...) in the presence of axial, shoulder, scapula, arm, or hand pain may be indicative of compression by an apical lung tumor (Pancoast tumor). Horner syndrome in the presence of acute-onset, ipsilateral facial or neck pain may indicate carotid artery dissection, which may be caused by cardiovascular disease, arteriopathy (eg, fibromuscular dysplasia or collagen disorders), or trauma (even minor trauma, such as results from quick head turns). If carotid artery dissection is suspected, especially if there are signs

2014 eMedicine.com

88. Horner Syndrome (Diagnosis)

that may give rise to Horner syndrome include the following: Pancoast tumor (tumor in the apex of the lung, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma) Birth trauma with injury to lower brachial plexus [ ] Cervical rib Aneurysm or dissection of the aorta Lesions of the subclavian or common carotid artery Central venous catheterization Trauma or surgical injury (eg, due to radical neck dissection, thyroidectomy, [ ] carotid angiography, radiofrequency tonsil ablation, [ ] chiropractic manipulation (...) in the presence of axial, shoulder, scapula, arm, or hand pain may be indicative of compression by an apical lung tumor (Pancoast tumor). Horner syndrome in the presence of acute-onset, ipsilateral facial or neck pain may indicate carotid artery dissection, which may be caused by cardiovascular disease, arteriopathy (eg, fibromuscular dysplasia or collagen disorders), or trauma (even minor trauma, such as results from quick head turns). If carotid artery dissection is suspected, especially if there are signs

2014 eMedicine.com

89. Horner Syndrome (Treatment)

that may give rise to Horner syndrome include the following: Pancoast tumor (tumor in the apex of the lung, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma) Birth trauma with injury to lower brachial plexus [ ] Cervical rib Aneurysm or dissection of the aorta Lesions of the subclavian or common carotid artery Central venous catheterization Trauma or surgical injury (eg, due to radical neck dissection, thyroidectomy, [ ] carotid angiography, radiofrequency tonsil ablation, [ ] chiropractic manipulation (...) in the presence of axial, shoulder, scapula, arm, or hand pain may be indicative of compression by an apical lung tumor (Pancoast tumor). Horner syndrome in the presence of acute-onset, ipsilateral facial or neck pain may indicate carotid artery dissection, which may be caused by cardiovascular disease, arteriopathy (eg, fibromuscular dysplasia or collagen disorders), or trauma (even minor trauma, such as results from quick head turns). If carotid artery dissection is suspected, especially if there are signs

2014 eMedicine.com

90. Horner Syndrome (Treatment)

that may give rise to Horner syndrome include the following: Pancoast tumor (tumor in the apex of the lung, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma) Birth trauma with injury to lower brachial plexus [ ] Cervical rib Aneurysm or dissection of the aorta Lesions of the subclavian or common carotid artery Central venous catheterization Trauma or surgical injury (eg, due to radical neck dissection, thyroidectomy, [ ] carotid angiography, radiofrequency tonsil ablation, [ ] chiropractic manipulation (...) in the presence of axial, shoulder, scapula, arm, or hand pain may be indicative of compression by an apical lung tumor (Pancoast tumor). Horner syndrome in the presence of acute-onset, ipsilateral facial or neck pain may indicate carotid artery dissection, which may be caused by cardiovascular disease, arteriopathy (eg, fibromuscular dysplasia or collagen disorders), or trauma (even minor trauma, such as results from quick head turns). If carotid artery dissection is suspected, especially if there are signs

2014 eMedicine.com

91. Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (Overview)

Dental extractions Cervical rib resection Fracture repair (Colles fracture) Arthroscopy Local disorders associated with CRPS 1 include the following: Nerve compression syndromes Arthritis Tissue ischemia Stenosing tenosynovitis Systemic disorders associated with CRPS 1 include the following: Myocardial infarction Stroke Pancoast tumor Pancreatic cancer Herpes zoster Previous Next: Epidemiology Frequency In the United States, an estimated 5% of patients who experience trauma to the upper extremity (...) or ischaemic origin. NICE. Available at . Accessed: September 26, 2014. [Guideline] Perez RS, Zollinger PE, Dijkstra PU, Thomassen-Hilgersom IL, Zuurmond WW, Rosenbrand KC, et al. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1. BMC Neurol . 2010 Mar 31. 10:20. . . Midbari A, Suzan E, Adler T, Melamed E, Norman D, Vulfsons S, et al. Amputation in patients with complex regional pain syndrome: a comparative study between amputees and non-amputees with intractable disease. Bone Joint J

2014 eMedicine.com

92. The Approach to the Painful Joint (Treatment)

Trauma Hemarthrosis Osteonecrosis Inflammatory processes associated with chronic monoarthritis include the following: Chronic infectious arthritis (see ) Crystalline synovitis (see ) Pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (RA; see ) Systemic rheumatic disease presenting with monoarticular involvement Noninflammatory processes associated with chronic monoarthritis include the following: Ischemic necrosis (see ) Hemarthrosis Paget disease involving the joint (see ) Metastatic tumor Synovial (...) polyarthritis include the following: Traumatic osteoarthritis (see ) Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy Amyloidosis (see ) Differential diagnoses for regional musculoskeletal pain Shoulder Referred pain may derive from cervical disorders, Pancoast tumor of the lung, subphrenic pathology, or entrapment neuropathies and brachial neuritis (see ). Rotator cuff tendinitis (see ) [ ] is inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons, arising acutely as a result of a recognizable injury (throwing) or insidiously

2014 eMedicine.com

93. Horner Syndrome (Overview)

that may give rise to Horner syndrome include the following: Pancoast tumor (tumor in the apex of the lung, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma) Birth trauma with injury to lower brachial plexus [ ] Cervical rib Aneurysm or dissection of the aorta Lesions of the subclavian or common carotid artery Central venous catheterization Trauma or surgical injury (eg, due to radical neck dissection, thyroidectomy, [ ] carotid angiography, radiofrequency tonsil ablation, [ ] chiropractic manipulation (...) in the presence of axial, shoulder, scapula, arm, or hand pain may be indicative of compression by an apical lung tumor (Pancoast tumor). Horner syndrome in the presence of acute-onset, ipsilateral facial or neck pain may indicate carotid artery dissection, which may be caused by cardiovascular disease, arteriopathy (eg, fibromuscular dysplasia or collagen disorders), or trauma (even minor trauma, such as results from quick head turns). If carotid artery dissection is suspected, especially if there are signs

2014 eMedicine.com

94. Horner Syndrome (Overview)

that may give rise to Horner syndrome include the following: Pancoast tumor (tumor in the apex of the lung, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma) Birth trauma with injury to lower brachial plexus [ ] Cervical rib Aneurysm or dissection of the aorta Lesions of the subclavian or common carotid artery Central venous catheterization Trauma or surgical injury (eg, due to radical neck dissection, thyroidectomy, [ ] carotid angiography, radiofrequency tonsil ablation, [ ] chiropractic manipulation (...) in the presence of axial, shoulder, scapula, arm, or hand pain may be indicative of compression by an apical lung tumor (Pancoast tumor). Horner syndrome in the presence of acute-onset, ipsilateral facial or neck pain may indicate carotid artery dissection, which may be caused by cardiovascular disease, arteriopathy (eg, fibromuscular dysplasia or collagen disorders), or trauma (even minor trauma, such as results from quick head turns). If carotid artery dissection is suspected, especially if there are signs

2014 eMedicine.com

95. The Approach to the Painful Joint (Overview)

Trauma Hemarthrosis Osteonecrosis Inflammatory processes associated with chronic monoarthritis include the following: Chronic infectious arthritis (see ) Crystalline synovitis (see ) Pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (RA; see ) Systemic rheumatic disease presenting with monoarticular involvement Noninflammatory processes associated with chronic monoarthritis include the following: Ischemic necrosis (see ) Hemarthrosis Paget disease involving the joint (see ) Metastatic tumor Synovial (...) polyarthritis include the following: Traumatic osteoarthritis (see ) Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy Amyloidosis (see ) Differential diagnoses for regional musculoskeletal pain Shoulder Referred pain may derive from cervical disorders, Pancoast tumor of the lung, subphrenic pathology, or entrapment neuropathies and brachial neuritis (see ). Rotator cuff tendinitis (see ) [ ] is inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons, arising acutely as a result of a recognizable injury (throwing) or insidiously

2014 eMedicine.com

96. Horner Syndrome (Follow-up)

that may give rise to Horner syndrome include the following: Pancoast tumor (tumor in the apex of the lung, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma) Birth trauma with injury to lower brachial plexus [ ] Cervical rib Aneurysm or dissection of the aorta Lesions of the subclavian or common carotid artery Central venous catheterization Trauma or surgical injury (eg, due to radical neck dissection, thyroidectomy, [ ] carotid angiography, radiofrequency tonsil ablation, [ ] chiropractic manipulation (...) in the presence of axial, shoulder, scapula, arm, or hand pain may be indicative of compression by an apical lung tumor (Pancoast tumor). Horner syndrome in the presence of acute-onset, ipsilateral facial or neck pain may indicate carotid artery dissection, which may be caused by cardiovascular disease, arteriopathy (eg, fibromuscular dysplasia or collagen disorders), or trauma (even minor trauma, such as results from quick head turns). If carotid artery dissection is suspected, especially if there are signs

2014 eMedicine.com

97. Horner Syndrome (Follow-up)

that may give rise to Horner syndrome include the following: Pancoast tumor (tumor in the apex of the lung, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma) Birth trauma with injury to lower brachial plexus [ ] Cervical rib Aneurysm or dissection of the aorta Lesions of the subclavian or common carotid artery Central venous catheterization Trauma or surgical injury (eg, due to radical neck dissection, thyroidectomy, [ ] carotid angiography, radiofrequency tonsil ablation, [ ] chiropractic manipulation (...) in the presence of axial, shoulder, scapula, arm, or hand pain may be indicative of compression by an apical lung tumor (Pancoast tumor). Horner syndrome in the presence of acute-onset, ipsilateral facial or neck pain may indicate carotid artery dissection, which may be caused by cardiovascular disease, arteriopathy (eg, fibromuscular dysplasia or collagen disorders), or trauma (even minor trauma, such as results from quick head turns). If carotid artery dissection is suspected, especially if there are signs

2014 eMedicine.com

98. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

. These include multiple sclerosis, cervical radiculopathy, Pancoast tumor, brachial plexitis or brachial plexopathy, pronator syndrome, ulnar or radial neuropathy, generalized neuropathy, and median nerve contusion. Although the appearance of carpal tunnel syndrome is fairly distinctive on MRI, differential possibilities include contusion and lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve. A clinical history of recent trauma or a longstanding mass often allows the exclusion or inclusion of these etiologies (...) supported early suggestions that measurement of the cross-sectional area and morphology of the median nerve with high-resolution sonography compares favorably with physical examination alone. Additionally, ultrasound may prove to be a beneficial adjunct in the conservative treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. [ , , , , ] Plain radiographs have no role in the evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome except for their ability to show the anatomic relationship of the carpal bones and evidence of severe prior

2014 eMedicine Radiology

99. The Approach to the Painful Joint (Follow-up)

Trauma Hemarthrosis Osteonecrosis Inflammatory processes associated with chronic monoarthritis include the following: Chronic infectious arthritis (see ) Crystalline synovitis (see ) Pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (RA; see ) Systemic rheumatic disease presenting with monoarticular involvement Noninflammatory processes associated with chronic monoarthritis include the following: Ischemic necrosis (see ) Hemarthrosis Paget disease involving the joint (see ) Metastatic tumor Synovial (...) polyarthritis include the following: Traumatic osteoarthritis (see ) Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy Amyloidosis (see ) Differential diagnoses for regional musculoskeletal pain Shoulder Referred pain may derive from cervical disorders, Pancoast tumor of the lung, subphrenic pathology, or entrapment neuropathies and brachial neuritis (see ). Rotator cuff tendinitis (see ) [ ] is inflammation of the rotator cuff tendons, arising acutely as a result of a recognizable injury (throwing) or insidiously

2014 eMedicine.com

100. Shoulder Pain

Shoulder Pain Cardiac (e.g. , ) Left arm, or Neck, lower jaw, and interscapular Pulmonary (Carcinoma, , or abscess) Pancoast (Apical Tumor of superior sulcus lung) Other mediastinal, aorta, esophageal causes VII. Causes: Malignant Sources of Referred Shoulder Pain Bone Metastases ( most common) metastases (less common) Ribs, spine, and (more common) XRay and bone scans have high Periosteal bone formation Results in cranial or spinal impingement Usually minimal or no symptoms Increased pain Think tous (...) Shoulder Pain Shoulder Pain Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Shoulder Pain Shoulder Pain Aka: Shoulder Pain II. Causes

2015 FP Notebook

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