How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

158 results for

Pancoast Tumor

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Robotic Hybrid Approach for an Anterior Pancoast Tumor in a Severely Obese Patient. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Robotic Hybrid Approach for an Anterior Pancoast Tumor in a Severely Obese Patient. Several different surgical approaches to anterior Pancoast tumors have been proposed. The osteomuscular-sparing transmanubrial approach allows optimal exposure and control of apical chest wall structures, but it requires an additional thoracotomy to perform the lobectomy with radical lymph node resection. The presented technique combines the osteomuscular-sparing transmanubrial approach with robotic-assisted

2018 Annals of Thoracic Surgery

2. A rare presentation of myxofibrosarcoma as a Pancoast tumor: a case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

and infectious etiologies, as well as neoplasms of benign and malignant nature. Of the neoplasms implicated, the most common are non-small cell lung carcinomas; myxofibrosarcoma presenting as a Pancoast tumor has not been reported in the literature. (...) A rare presentation of myxofibrosarcoma as a Pancoast tumor: a case report Myxofibrosarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue neoplasm, classified as a variant of malignant fibrous histiocytoma. Most often, it occurs in middle to late adult life peaking in the seventh decade and involving the lower extremities (77%), trunk (12%), and retroperitoneum or mediastinum (8%). We report the first case of thoracic myxofibrosarcoma presenting as a Pancoast tumor.A 48-year-old non-tobacco smoking African

2017 Journal of medical case reports

3. Less Invasive Approach to Pancoast Tumor in a Partitioned Incision Full Text available with Trip Pro

Less Invasive Approach to Pancoast Tumor in a Partitioned Incision We describe our approach to resect a Pancoast tumor with thoracoscopic assistance in a partitioned incision. We used the LigaSure vessel-sealing system under thoracoscopy in chest wall resection for Pancoast tumor. This approach is of great utility: easy-to use and less invasive for Pancoast tumor resection.

2017 Annals of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

4. Pancoast tumor approach through oesophagus Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pancoast tumor approach through oesophagus Patient with Pancoast Tumor usually present in advanced stage of the disease which requires chemotherapy and radiotherapy as options of treatment. Histologic confirmation is a key for further treatment of these patients. Normally in bronchoscopy the lesion can't be visualised and in result making biopsy difficult to perform. Transthoracic biopsy through computed tomography poses anatomic difficulties and not always the pulmonary lesion can be reached (...) the diagnosis of lung carcinoma Pancoast tumor using EBUS bronchoscope with approach through oesophagus (EUS-B FNA). There may be a role in using EBUS specifically to diagnose a pancoast tumor in the right patient population.

2017 Respiratory Medicine Case Reports

5. Trimodality therapy for Pancoast tumors: T4 is not a contraindication to radical surgery. (Abstract)

Trimodality therapy for Pancoast tumors: T4 is not a contraindication to radical surgery. This study aims to evaluate the impact of T stage and extended surgery on the outcome of patients with Pancoast tumors after induction chemoradiation therapy.Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent chemoradiation therapy (platin-based, 45-66 Gy) followed by surgery between 1998 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed.In 28 (61%) patients with T4 tumors, extended procedures (more than rib (...) , pathological positive N stage had a negative impact on OS and lack of pathological response negatively impacted both OS and DFS.Trimodality treatment including radical resection for Pancoast tumors provides good surgical outcome and favorable long-term results. Survival of patients with T4 tumors and extended surgical procedures comparable to that of patients with T3 tumors undergoing rib resection only.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

2017 Journal of Surgical Oncology

6. Pancoast Tumor

Database) Ontology: Pancoast Tumor (C0549471) Definition (MSH) A lung tumor located in the superior pulmonary sulcus. Definition (NCI_NCI-GLOSS) A type of lung cancer that begins in the upper part of a lung and spreads to nearby tissues such as the ribs and vertebrae. Most Pancoast tumors are non-small cell cancers. Definition (NCI) A malignant neoplasm originating from the apical lung. Most malignant superior sulcus neoplasms are bronchogenic carcinomas. This tumor may be associated with Pancoast (...) , superior sulcus tumor , Pancoast tumor , Pancoast tumour , Superior sulcus tumor , Superior sulcus tumour , Pancoast tumor (disorder) , Pancoast; tumor , tumor; Pancoast , Malignant Superior Sulcus Lung Neoplasm , Malignant Superior Sulcus Lung Tumor , Malignant Superior Sulcus Neoplasm of Lung , Malignant Superior Sulcus Neoplasm of the Lung , Malignant Superior Sulcus Neoplasm , Malignant Superior Sulcus Tumor of Lung , Malignant Superior Sulcus Tumor of the Lung , Malignant Superior Sulcus Tumor

2018 FP Notebook

7. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors) Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has

2016 Annals of Translational Medicine

9. Chest wall reconstruction after en bloc Pancoast tumour resection with the use of MatrixRib and SILC fixation systems: technical note. (Abstract)

systems of fixation commonly applied in spinal practice.The operation of a squamous cell carcinoma (Pancoast tumour) of the right lung infiltrating T2, T3 and T4 vertebrae was performed though T4 lateral thoracotomy. Posterior instrumentation with transpedicular screws T1-3-5 on the left and T1-5 on the right side was followed with the right upper lobectomy and hemivertebrectomy. The laminae and facet joints of T2-T4 vertebrae were removed on the side of the tumour. An osteotomy was performed medial (...) Chest wall reconstruction after en bloc Pancoast tumour resection with the use of MatrixRib and SILC fixation systems: technical note. Technical note.In cases in which partial resection of the rib cage is accomplished with vertebrectomy, reconstruction of the chest wall may be challenging. That is because of lack of the anchor point which normally would be a proximal end of a rib or transverse process. We report a straightforward technique for chest wall reconstruction with the novel use of two

2015 European Spine Journal

10. Extracorporeal Lung Support as a Bridge to Airway Stenting and Radiotherapy for Airway-Obstructing Pancoast Tumor. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Extracorporeal Lung Support as a Bridge to Airway Stenting and Radiotherapy for Airway-Obstructing Pancoast Tumor. Venovenous (V-V) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used for respiratory failure that is suspected to be reversible (bridge to recovery), or as a bridge to lung transplantation. Patients with proximal airway obstruction due to endobronchial malignancy can develop acute respiratory failure, and may benefit from V-V ECMO as a bridge to airway intervention, further (...) treatment, and eventual recovery. We describe a case of a superior sulcus tumor with tracheobronchial and superior vena cava invasion causing both respiratory failure and superior vena cava syndrome. This was treated successfully with V-V ECMO, bronchial stenting, and radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2016 Annals of Thoracic Surgery

11. An unusual cause of acute headache: subarachnoid free air secondary to spontaneous bronchopleurodurosubarachnoid fistula from a Pancoast tumor Full Text available with Trip Pro

An unusual cause of acute headache: subarachnoid free air secondary to spontaneous bronchopleurodurosubarachnoid fistula from a Pancoast tumor Pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis are related to transgression of the barriers to the central nervous system. We present a patient with a Pancoast tumor treated with palliative chemoradiation who developed symptomatic spinal and intracranial air caused by spontaneous bronchopleurodurosubarachnoid fistula secondary to direct tumor invasion into the thecal

2016 Radiology Case Reports

12. Video-assisted pulmonary lobectomy combined with transmanubrial approach for anterior Pancoast tumor resection: case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Video-assisted pulmonary lobectomy combined with transmanubrial approach for anterior Pancoast tumor resection: case report The mini-ivasive approach to superior sulcus tumors is an uncommon procedure that is still far from standardization. We describe a hybrid surgical technique to approach "en block" chest resection and pulmonary lobectomy for anterior superior sulcus tumors.A patient affected by right anterior Pancoast tumor surgically staged as cT4N0M0 (suspected anonymous vein invasion (...) and at the 9 months follow-up she was free from disease and post-thoracotomy syndrome.In our opinion such hybrid VATS procedure has several advantages: starting with thoracoscopy it is possibleto exclude previously undetected pleural dissemination and to precisely define the tumor location as well as limits of the thoracic wall resection; time could be spared maintaining the patients in the supine position for both surgical times; postoperative pain and post-thoracotomy syndrome could be minimized avoiding

2016 Journal of cardiothoracic surgery

13. Single Posterior Approach for En-Bloc Resection and Stabilization for Locally Advanced Pancoast Tumors Involving the Spine: Single Centre Experience Full Text available with Trip Pro

Single Posterior Approach for En-Bloc Resection and Stabilization for Locally Advanced Pancoast Tumors Involving the Spine: Single Centre Experience Monocentric prospective study.To assess the safety and effectiveness of the posterior approach for resection of advanced Pancoast tumors.In patients with advanced Pancoast tumors invading the spine, most surgical teams consider the combined approach to be necessary for "en-bloc" resection to control visceral, vascular, and neurological structures (...) . We report our preliminary experience with a single-stage posterior approach.We included all patients who underwent posterior en-bloc resection of advanced Pancoast tumors invading the spine in our institution between January 2014 and May 2015. All patients had locally advanced tumors without N2 nodes or distant metastases. All patients, except 1, benefited from induction treatment consisting of a combination of concomitant chemotherapy (cisplatin-VP16) and radiation.Five patients were included

2016 Asian spine journal

14. Squamous Cell Carcinoma on the Remaining Sequel of Tuberculosis, Presented as Pancoast Tumor 8 Years Later Full Text available with Trip Pro

Squamous Cell Carcinoma on the Remaining Sequel of Tuberculosis, Presented as Pancoast Tumor 8 Years Later Herein a 46 year-old man is presented with intolerable severe pain of right shoulder radiating to right arm and fourth and fifth fingers. He had a history of right upper lobectomy due to complicated tuberculosis eight years ago. Based on the findings of clinical examination and computed tomography imaging, diagnosis of Pancoast tumor of the right chest apex was confirmed. However, Fine (...) Needle Aspiration (FNA) under computed tomography (CT) guidance was not conclusive. By performing a limited thoracotomy, multiple biopsy specimens were obtained from the mass and destroyed ribs for histopathologic examination which consequently confirmed the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. Eventually, the patient was referred to the radiotherapy ward for treatment of Pancoast tumor.

2012 Tanaffos

15. Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Pancoast Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Radicular Neck Pain in the Emergency Department. (Abstract)

Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Pancoast Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Radicular Neck Pain in the Emergency Department. Pancoast syndrome is an uncommon complication of apical lung tumors. Symptoms include pain, brachial plexopathy, and Horner's syndrome, and are the result of extrinsic compression of tissues within the thoracic inlet. Lymphoma is a very rare etiology.We describe the presentation of a 59-year-old male with recurrent diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting (...) with Pancoast syndrome. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Cancer is an uncommon cause of radicular neck pain but should be considered in the differential, particularly when constitutional complaints are also present. Symptoms and physical examination findings associated with Pancoast syndrome are the consequence of compression of the C7-T2 vertebral roots and sympathetic chain. Computed tomography is usually required to definitively visualize the mass.Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All

2018 Journal of Emergency Medicine

16. Pancoast Tumor (Diagnosis)

Author: Karl J D'Silva, MD; Chief Editor: Nagla Abdel Karim, MD, PhD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Pancoast Syndrome Overview Practice Essentials Pancoast syndrome (Pancoast’s syndrome) typically results when a malignant neoplasm of the superior sulcus of the lung (lung cancer) leads to destructive lesions of the thoracic inlet and involvement of the brachial plexus and cervical sympathetic nerves (stellate ganglion). [ , , ] This is accompanied by the following: Severe pain (...) in the shoulder region radiating toward the axilla and scapula, with later extension along the ulnar aspect of the arm to the hand Atrophy of hand and arm muscles ( , miosis, hemianhidrosis, ) Compression of the blood vessels with edema Most Pancoast tumors are (SCCs) or adenocarcinomas; only 3-5% are small cell carcinomas. Squamous cell carcinoma occurs more frequently, although large cell and undifferentiated types are also common. Adenocarcinoma is sometimes found in this location and can even

2014 eMedicine Surgery

17. Pancoast Tumor (Overview)

Author: Karl J D'Silva, MD; Chief Editor: Nagla Abdel Karim, MD, PhD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Pancoast Syndrome Overview Practice Essentials Pancoast syndrome (Pancoast’s syndrome) typically results when a malignant neoplasm of the superior sulcus of the lung (lung cancer) leads to destructive lesions of the thoracic inlet and involvement of the brachial plexus and cervical sympathetic nerves (stellate ganglion). [ , , ] This is accompanied by the following: Severe pain (...) in the shoulder region radiating toward the axilla and scapula, with later extension along the ulnar aspect of the arm to the hand Atrophy of hand and arm muscles ( , miosis, hemianhidrosis, ) Compression of the blood vessels with edema Most Pancoast tumors are (SCCs) or adenocarcinomas; only 3-5% are small cell carcinomas. Squamous cell carcinoma occurs more frequently, although large cell and undifferentiated types are also common. Adenocarcinoma is sometimes found in this location and can even

2014 eMedicine Surgery

18. Pancoast Tumor

. . Yang PC, Lee LN, Luh KT, et al. Ultrasonography of Pancoast tumor. Chest . 1988 Jul. 94(1):124-8. . Ozmen O, Yilmaz U, Dadali Y, Tatci E, Gokcek A, Aydin E, et al. Use of FDG PET/CT in Patients with Pancoast Tumors: Does It Add Any Contribution to Patient Management?. Cancer Biother Radiopharm . 2015 Oct. 30 (8):359-67. . Kuraishi H, Yamashita J, Tsuchiya Y, Kokubu F, Takizawa K. [A case of lung adenocarcinoma of pancoast type successfully treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy]. Gan To Kagaku (...) Author: Melanie Guerrero, MD; Chief Editor: Eugene C Lin, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Pancoast Tumor Imaging Overview Overview Pancoast tumors are neoplasms of pulmonary origin located at the apical pleuropulmonary groove (superior sulcus). [ , ] Pancoast tumors and their associated morbidities are presented in images below. Pancoast tumor. A 53-year-old man with a 50 pack-year history of smoking began experiencing upper back pain for several weeks. PA chest radiograph shows

2014 eMedicine Radiology

19. Pancoast Tumor (Treatment)

be curable. However, extrapolation from the data for non-Pancoast stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggests that chemoradiotherapy is the best approach. In patients whose disease is believed incurable, radiotherapy offers good palliation of pain. Ultrasound-guided cervical nerve roots ablation can be considered for patients with intractable neuropathic pain secondary to Pancoast tumor. Anecdotal reports have described excellent pain relief as well as improvement in quality of sleep (...) Gaz . 1838. 1:16-18. Glassman LR, Hyman K. Pancoast tumor: a modern perspective on an old problem. Curr Opin Pulm Med . 2013 Jul. 19 (4):340-3. . Paulson DL. Carcinomas in the superior pulmonary sulcus. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg . 1975 Dec. 70(6):1095-104. . Pitz CC, de la Rivière AB, van Swieten HA, Duurkens VA, Lammers JW, van den Bosch JM. Surgical treatment of Pancoast tumours. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg . 2004 Jul. 26(1):202-8. . Maggi G, Casadio C, Pischedda F, et al. Combined radiosurgical

2014 eMedicine Surgery

20. Pancoast Tumor (Follow-up)

be curable. However, extrapolation from the data for non-Pancoast stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggests that chemoradiotherapy is the best approach. In patients whose disease is believed incurable, radiotherapy offers good palliation of pain. Ultrasound-guided cervical nerve roots ablation can be considered for patients with intractable neuropathic pain secondary to Pancoast tumor. Anecdotal reports have described excellent pain relief as well as improvement in quality of sleep (...) Gaz . 1838. 1:16-18. Glassman LR, Hyman K. Pancoast tumor: a modern perspective on an old problem. Curr Opin Pulm Med . 2013 Jul. 19 (4):340-3. . Paulson DL. Carcinomas in the superior pulmonary sulcus. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg . 1975 Dec. 70(6):1095-104. . Pitz CC, de la Rivière AB, van Swieten HA, Duurkens VA, Lammers JW, van den Bosch JM. Surgical treatment of Pancoast tumours. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg . 2004 Jul. 26(1):202-8. . Maggi G, Casadio C, Pischedda F, et al. Combined radiosurgical

2014 eMedicine Surgery

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>