How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

9,603 results for

Pain Sensation

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

121. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Interventional Pain Management

into the epidural space. Low voltage electrical signals are delivered to the dorsal column of the spinal cord in order to override or mask sensations of pain. The patient’s pain distribution pattern determines the level at which the stimulation lead is placed. The lead may incorporate four (4) to eight (8) electrodes, with 8 electrodes typically used for complex pain patterns, such as bilateral pain or pain extending from the limbs to the trunk. Implantation is typically a 2-step process. Initially (...) AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Interventional Pain Management Appropriate.Safe.Affordable © 2017 AIM Specialty Health 2062-0617 v.1 Interventional Pain Management Guidelines Musculoskeletal Program Interventional Pain Management EFFECTIVE NOVEMBER 1, 2017 LAST REVIEWED JUNE 13, 2017 Copyright © 2017. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. Interventional Pain Management 2 Table of Contents Description and Application of the Guidelines 3 Epidural Injection Procedures

2017 AIM Specialty Health

122. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain

Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF LOW BACK PAIN Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define a standard of care and should not be construed (...) and/or therapeutic interventions within these guidelines does not guarantee coverage of civilian sector care. Additional information on current TRICARE benefits may be found at www.tricare.mil or by contacting your regional TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor. Version 2.0 – 2017VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain September 2017 Page 2 of 110 Prepared by: The Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain Work Group With support from: The Office of Quality, Safety

2017 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

123. Management of Opioid Therapy (OT) for Chronic Pain

that details the process by which VA/DoD guidelines will be developed, including the use of the GRADE methodology.[1] As required by Congress in CARA, the Work Group reviewed and considered the CDC guideline and its inclusion in the VA/DoD OT CPG.[34] D. Taxonomy Pain is defined as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage…Pain is always subjective…It is unquestionably a sensation in a part or parts of the body (...) Management of Opioid Therapy (OT) for Chronic Pain VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR OPIOID THERAPY FOR CHRONIC PAIN Department of Veterans Affairs Department of Defense QUALIFYING STATEMENTS The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense guidelines are based upon the best information available at the time of publication. They are designed to provide information and assist decision making. They are not intended to define a standard of care and should not be construed

2017 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

124. Pain affect in the absence of pain sensation: evidence of asomaesthesia after somatosensory cortex lesions in the rat. (PubMed)

Pain affect in the absence of pain sensation: evidence of asomaesthesia after somatosensory cortex lesions in the rat. Multidimensional models of pain processing distinguish the sensory, motivational, and affective components of the pain experience. Efforts to understand underlying mechanisms have focused on isolating the roles of specific brain structures, including both limbic and non-limbic cortical areas, in the processing of nociceptive stimuli. The purpose of this study was to examine (...) the role of the somatosensory cortex in both sensory and affective aspects of pain processing. It was hypothesized that animals with lesions of the hind limb area of the somatosensory cortex would demonstrate altered sensory processing (asomaesthesia, a deficit in the ability to detect and identify somatic sensation) in the presence of an inflammatory state when compared to animals with sham lesions. The level of pain affect produced by an inflammatory pain condition was not expected to change

2012 Pain

125. Complex regional pain syndrome in adults. UK guidelines for diagnosis, referral and management in primary and secondary care 2018 (2nd edition)

Complex regional pain syndrome in adults. UK guidelines for diagnosis, referral and management in primary and secondary care 2018 (2nd edition) Complex regional pain syndrome in adults UK guidelines for diagnosis, referral and management in primary and secondary care 2018 2nd edition 2nd editionComplex regional pain syndrome in adults These guidelines were developed by a panel of experts with support from, representation and endorsement by the Royal College of General Practitioners, the Royal (...) College of Physicians, the Faculty of Pain Medicine of the Royal College of Anaesthetists, the Royal College of Occupational Therapists, the British Orthopaedic Association, the British Pain Society, the British Psychological Society, the British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine, the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, the Directorate of Defence Rehabilitation, the Physiotherapy Pain Association, the Society of British Neurological Surgeons, the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, the British

2018 British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine

126. Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 1

. Study recruitment is being conducted separately for both young people and parents. Please email if you would like to take part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS (...) Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 1 Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain - reflections on Traeger et al. part 1 Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 1 November 27, 2018 by The PREVENT trial published recently in seems to have created a storm. If views and tweets and general social noise are your metric, then this one weighs in pretty well – over 15K views

2018 Body in Mind blog

127. Editor’s picks: When pain kills – chronic pain and chronic diseases

their future. Study recruitment is being conducted separately for both young people and parents. Please email if you would like to take part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help (...) Editor’s picks: When pain kills – chronic pain and chronic diseases Editor’s picks: When pain kills – chronic pain and chronic diseases • Body in Mind Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain Editor’s picks: When pain kills – chronic pain and chronic diseases January 9, 2018 by Over this holiday season we are publishing our Editor’s picks of 2017 for you to read and enjoy again. — One high profile campaign to raise awareness of persistent pain uses the tagline ‘persistent

2018 Body in Mind blog

128. How do pain and working memory interact? Can we decrease pain by improving working memory?

for the tactile stimulus (Figure 2A). Non-painful (tactile) was determined as the first stimulus intensity that produced a tactile sensation under the electrodes (Figure 2B). Painful stimuli were 120% of the NFR threshold (Figure 2C). In both sessions, stimulus intensity was adjusted individually and the painful and tactile stimuli were always delivered with the same pair of electrodes. Figure 2. the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) measurement During both sessions, participants performed the same WM task (...) ) The between-session comparisons revealed no significant difference between anodal and sham tDCS. Our results showed that by enhancing WM performance, we can improve pain inhibition. The results imply that anodal tDCS can suppress pain indirectly by improving WM performance since pain inhibition by WM improvement was independent of descending inhibition of spinal nociception [7]. What were limitations of our study? It could be argued that participants may feel different sensations in the sham and anodal

2018 Body in Mind blog

129. The pediatric pain equation: Where do parental injustice appraisals of pain fit in?

The pediatric pain equation: Where do parental injustice appraisals of pain fit in? Pediatric pain equation: Where do parental injustice appraisals of pain fit in? Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain The pediatric pain equation: Where do parental injustice appraisals of pain fit in? July 13, 2018 by Pain is not a singular physical sensation. It can be amplified or reduced by a multitude of physical, psychological, and social factors. For example, we recently found (...) part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain

2018 Body in Mind blog

130. Pain, please: Why would anybody volunteer to participate in pain research?

the likelihood of participating in research involving painful stimuli with pain-specific outcomes such as fear of pain and pain catastrophizing, as well as other outcomes that we thought might be relevant, such as sensation seeking, anxiety, and gender identity. In Study 2, we advertised two almost identical studies, one involving painful stimuli and the other one involving no painful stimuli. We then compared the people who signed up for the pain study with the people who signed up for the non-pain study (...) on the same outcomes as in the first study. What did we find? In total, 275 people participated in Study 1. Interestingly, more than half of the participants indicated that it is unlikely that they would ever participate in pain research. In the end, our analyses showed that participants who said that they would participate in pain research were older, had lower levels of pain-related fear, and higher sensation seeking. Eighty-seven participants took part in Study 2. In this study, we found that people

2018 Body in Mind blog

131. Pain? Where?! Attentional bias for pain in the brain

psychologist, his timing could not have been better. Indeed, his accident proved to be the perfect illustration of what I was about to study. Every time he did his physio exercises, I noticed his response strongly depended on the movement he was about to execute. When the movement was pain-free, he would do it without hesitation. However, when the movement hurt, he would suddenly pay very close attention to the sensations in hand. Did the threat of pain steer my father’s attention? Unfortunately, based (...) pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain condition. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes and the responses are anonymous. Prof Paul Hodges on pain and altered

2018 Body in Mind blog

132. Pathophysiological mechanisms of neuropathic pain: comparison of sensory phenotypes in patients and human surrogate pain models. (PubMed)

characterized by pronounced thermal and mechanical sensory loss, but also mild pinprick hyperalgesia and paradoxical heat sensations. Primary hyperalgesia was characterized by pronounced gain for heat, pressure and pinprick pain, and mild thermal sensory loss. Secondary hyperalgesia was characterized by pronounced pinprick hyperalgesia and mild thermal sensory loss. Topical lidocaine plus topical capsaicin induced a combined phenotype of NB plus PH. Topical menthol was the only model with significant cold (...) Pathophysiological mechanisms of neuropathic pain: comparison of sensory phenotypes in patients and human surrogate pain models. As an indirect approach to relate previously identified sensory phenotypes of patients suffering from peripheral neuropathic pain to underlying mechanisms, we used a published sorting algorithm to estimate the prevalence of denervation, peripheral and central sensitization in 657 healthy subjects undergoing experimental models of nerve block (NB) (compression block

2018 Pain

133. Editor’s picks: How does watching a parent in pain impact children’s own pain experiences?

and parents of young people with CRPS to complete a 20-25 online survey which asks them to think about their future. Study recruitment is being conducted separately for both young people and parents. Please email if you would like to take part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic (...) pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain condition. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes and the responses are anonymous. Prof Paul Hodges on pain and altered movement Am I safe to move? Listen to Lorimer Moseley talk to Karim Khan on new

2018 Body in Mind blog

134. Editor’s picks: Pain after cancer: A new model for pain psychology?

– to decide how much danger the body is in. The brain then produces an output based on all this information, the feeling of pain , to reflect that danger. Importantly, how we interpret painful sensations is an integral part of assigning meaning and making sense of those experiences. So if pain is about threat – if it’s about meaning – an ideal model to study pain would be one where there is little tissue damage but a high level of perceived danger. Scientists have played around with this idea in the lab (...) professionals give to patients following cancer treatment aren’t always helpful. A common message is “listen to your body; you know your body and when something isn’t right”. But if pain science has taught us anything over the last decade, it’s that . Our body, indeed our brain, can play tricks on us depending on the information we receive from the external world, through those pesky emotion and memory systems, and through our interpretation of those body sensations. I’m going to preempt what you’re

2018 Body in Mind blog

135. A break from pain! How do task interruptions by pain affect performance?

“What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain condition. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes (...) A break from pain! How do task interruptions by pain affect performance? A break from pain! How do task interruptions by pain affect performance? • Body in Mind Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain A break from pain! How do task interruptions by pain affect performance? March 27, 2018 by Pain is unpleasant but important for our survival: it is almost as if it is “designed” to tell us that we are in danger. Since people are often busy with something when pain occurs

2018 Body in Mind blog

136. The influence of pain-related expectations on intensity perception of non-painful somatosensory stimuli. (PubMed)

The influence of pain-related expectations on intensity perception of non-painful somatosensory stimuli. The extent to which pain-related expectations, known to affect pain perception, also affect perception of nonpainful sensations remains unclear, as well as the potential role of unpredictability in this context.In a proprioceptive fear conditioning paradigm, various arm extension movements were associated with predictable and unpredictable electrocutaneous pain or its absence. During (...) a subsequent test phase, nonpainful electrocutaneous stimuli with a high or low intensity were presented during movement execution. We used hierarchical drift diffusion modeling to examine the influence of expecting pain on the perceptual decision-making process underlying intensity perception of nonpainful sensations. In the first experiment (n = 36), the pain stimulus was never presented during the test phase after conditioning. In the second experiment (n = 39), partial reinforcement was adopted

2018 Psychosomatic Medicine

137. Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 2

a 20-25 online survey which asks them to think about their future. Study recruitment is being conducted separately for both young people and parents. Please email if you would like to take part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain (...) conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain condition. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes and the responses are anonymous. Prof Paul Hodges on pain and altered movement Am I safe to move? Listen to Lorimer Moseley talk to Karim Khan on new understanding of pain and focusing on the patient

2018 Body in Mind blog

138. First-in-human randomized clinical trials of the safety and efficacy of tanezumab for treatment of chronic knee osteoarthritis pain or acute bunionectomy pain (PubMed)

events were generally mild to moderate in severity and no patients discontinued as a result of adverse events. Adverse events of abnormal peripheral sensation were more common with higher doses of tanezumab (≥100 μg/kg) than with placebo. These were generally mild to moderate in severity. Tanezumab provided up to 12 weeks of effective analgesia for OA knee pain, with statistically significant improvements at doses ≥100 μg/kg (P < 0.05). By contrast, no trend for analgesic activity was found when (...) First-in-human randomized clinical trials of the safety and efficacy of tanezumab for treatment of chronic knee osteoarthritis pain or acute bunionectomy pain The neurotrophin nerve growth factor has a demonstrated role in pain transduction and pathophysiology.Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 studies were conducted to evaluate safety, tolerability, and analgesic efficacy of single doses of tanezumab, a humanized anti-nerve growth factor monoclonal antibody, in chronic

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Pain Reports

139. Brief Mindfulness and Nutrition-Based Interventions for Opioid-Treated Chronic Pain: Strategies to Ease Pain

on a BMBI which demonstrated analgesic effects in a previous study. Relative to full-length interventions, we will employ a brief intervention; the 20-minute BMBI session will include education on the foundational concepts of mindfulness and its relevance to chronic pain (5 minutes) and a guided mindfulness practice involving focused attention on the breath and monitoring of thoughts, feelings, and body sensations (15 minutes). BMBI participants will be encouraged to practice the taught mindfulness (...) Brief Mindfulness and Nutrition-Based Interventions for Opioid-Treated Chronic Pain: Strategies to Ease Pain Brief Mindfulness and Nutrition-Based Interventions for Opioid-Treated Chronic Pain: Strategies to Ease Pain - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies

2018 Clinical Trials

140. An Evaluation of a Customized Insole to Provide Relief From Heel Pain Due to Plantar Fasciitis or General Heel Pain When Used in Footwear Over a Period of Four Weeks

An Evaluation of a Customized Insole to Provide Relief From Heel Pain Due to Plantar Fasciitis or General Heel Pain When Used in Footwear Over a Period of Four Weeks An Evaluation of a Customized Insole to Provide Relief From Heel Pain Due to Plantar Fasciitis or General Heel Pain When Used in Footwear Over a Period of Four Weeks - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x (...) × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. An Evaluation of a Customized Insole to Provide Relief From Heel Pain Due to Plantar Fasciitis or General Heel Pain When Used in Footwear Over a Period of Four Weeks The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated

2018 Clinical Trials

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>