How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

9,679 results for

Pain Sensation

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

261. Achilles Pain, Stiffness, and Muscle Power Deficits; Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy Revision

associated with Achilles tendinopathy is M76.6 Achilles ten- dinitis/Achilles bursitis. The corresponding primary ICD- 9-CM code, commonly used in the United States, is 726.71 Achilles bursitis or tendinitis. The primary ICF body function codes associated with Achil- les tendinopathy are b28015 Pain in lower limb, b7300 Power of isolated muscles and muscle groups, and b7800 Sensation of muscle stiffness . The primary ICF body structures codes associated with Achilles tendinopathy are s75012 Muscles (...) by Achilles tendon tenderness, a positive arc sign, and positive find- ings on the Royal London Hospital test. These signs and symptoms are useful clinical findings for classifying a pa- tient with ankle pain into the ICD category of Achilles bur- sitis or tendinitis and the associated ICF impairment-based category of Achilles pain (b28015 Pain in lower limb), stiffness (b7800 Sensation of muscle stiffness), and mus- cle power deficits (b7301 Power of muscles of lower limb). Evidence Update II Hutchison

2018 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

262. Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Meniscal and Articular Cartilage Lesions

Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Meniscal and Articular Cartilage Lesions Clinical Practice Guidelines DAVID S. LOGERSTEDT , PT , PhD • DAVID A. SCALZITTI, PT , PhD • KIM L. BENNELL, PT , PhD • RANA S. HINMAN, PT , PhD HOLLY SILVERS-GRANELLI, PT , PhD • JAY EBERT , PhD • KAREN HAMBLY, PT , PhD • JAMES L. CAREY, MD, MPH LYNN SNYDER-MACKLER, PT , ScD, FAPTA • MICHAEL J. AXE, MD • CHRISTINE M. MCDONOUGH, PT , PhD Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Meniscal and Articular Cartilage Lesions (...) permission. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy®. All rights reserved.Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Clinical Practice Guidelines Revision 2018 a2 | february 2018 | volume 48 | number 2 | journal of orthopaedic & sports physical therapy EXAMINATION – OUTCOME MEASURES: ACTIVITY LIMITATIONS/ SELF-REPORTED MEASURES 2018 Recommendation B For knee-speci?c outcomes, clinicians should use the Interna- tional Knee Documentation Committee 2000 Subjective Knee Evaluation Form

2018 The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Inc.

263. Cancer Pain (PDQ®): Health Professional Version

(plexopathy) due to tumor masses or treatment complications (e.g., radiation plexopathy).[ ] The pain may be evoked by stimuli or spontaneous. Patients who experience pain from nonnoxious stimuli are classified as having allodynia . Hyperalgesia connotes increased sensations of pain out of proportion to what is usually experienced. Emotional distress may also contribute to the pain experience. Most patients with cancer and pain do not have somatic symptom disorder. However, if pain complaints appear (...) Cancer Pain (PDQ®): Health Professional Version Cancer Pain (PDQ®) - PDQ Cancer Information Summaries - NCBI Bookshelf Warning: The NCBI web site requires JavaScript to function. Search database Search term Search NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Cancer Institute (US); 2002-. PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): ; 2002-. Search term Cancer Pain

2017 PDQ - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database

264. Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 2

a 20-25 online survey which asks them to think about their future. Study recruitment is being conducted separately for both young people and parents. Please email if you would like to take part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain (...) conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain condition. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes and the responses are anonymous. Prof Paul Hodges on pain and altered movement Am I safe to move? Listen to Lorimer Moseley talk to Karim Khan on new understanding of pain and focusing on the patient

2018 Body in Mind blog

265. How do pain and working memory interact? Can we decrease pain by improving working memory?

for the tactile stimulus (Figure 2A). Non-painful (tactile) was determined as the first stimulus intensity that produced a tactile sensation under the electrodes (Figure 2B). Painful stimuli were 120% of the NFR threshold (Figure 2C). In both sessions, stimulus intensity was adjusted individually and the painful and tactile stimuli were always delivered with the same pair of electrodes. Figure 2. the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) measurement During both sessions, participants performed the same WM task (...) ) The between-session comparisons revealed no significant difference between anodal and sham tDCS. Our results showed that by enhancing WM performance, we can improve pain inhibition. The results imply that anodal tDCS can suppress pain indirectly by improving WM performance since pain inhibition by WM improvement was independent of descending inhibition of spinal nociception [7]. What were limitations of our study? It could be argued that participants may feel different sensations in the sham and anodal

2018 Body in Mind blog

266. How does prolonged experimental back pain alter measures of pain inhibition and facilitation?

your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain (...) How does prolonged experimental back pain alter measures of pain inhibition and facilitation? How does back pain alter measures of pain inhibition and facilitation? Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain How does prolonged experimental back pain alter measures of pain inhibition and facilitation? November 2, 2018 by Facilitation of central pain mechanisms is proposed to be a potential missing link between identifiable tissue damage and the severity of pain experienced

2018 Body in Mind blog

267. The pediatric pain equation: Where do parental injustice appraisals of pain fit in?

The pediatric pain equation: Where do parental injustice appraisals of pain fit in? Pediatric pain equation: Where do parental injustice appraisals of pain fit in? Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain The pediatric pain equation: Where do parental injustice appraisals of pain fit in? July 13, 2018 by Pain is not a singular physical sensation. It can be amplified or reduced by a multitude of physical, psychological, and social factors. For example, we recently found (...) part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain

2018 Body in Mind blog

268. A break from pain! How do task interruptions by pain affect performance?

“What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain condition. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes (...) A break from pain! How do task interruptions by pain affect performance? A break from pain! How do task interruptions by pain affect performance? • Body in Mind Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain A break from pain! How do task interruptions by pain affect performance? March 27, 2018 by Pain is unpleasant but important for our survival: it is almost as if it is “designed” to tell us that we are in danger. Since people are often busy with something when pain occurs

2018 Body in Mind blog

269. Pain, please: Why would anybody volunteer to participate in pain research?

the likelihood of participating in research involving painful stimuli with pain-specific outcomes such as fear of pain and pain catastrophizing, as well as other outcomes that we thought might be relevant, such as sensation seeking, anxiety, and gender identity. In Study 2, we advertised two almost identical studies, one involving painful stimuli and the other one involving no painful stimuli. We then compared the people who signed up for the pain study with the people who signed up for the non-pain study (...) on the same outcomes as in the first study. What did we find? In total, 275 people participated in Study 1. Interestingly, more than half of the participants indicated that it is unlikely that they would ever participate in pain research. In the end, our analyses showed that participants who said that they would participate in pain research were older, had lower levels of pain-related fear, and higher sensation seeking. Eighty-seven participants took part in Study 2. In this study, we found that people

2018 Body in Mind blog

270. Pain? Where?! Attentional bias for pain in the brain

psychologist, his timing could not have been better. Indeed, his accident proved to be the perfect illustration of what I was about to study. Every time he did his physio exercises, I noticed his response strongly depended on the movement he was about to execute. When the movement was pain-free, he would do it without hesitation. However, when the movement hurt, he would suddenly pay very close attention to the sensations in hand. Did the threat of pain steer my father’s attention? Unfortunately, based (...) pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain condition. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes and the responses are anonymous. Prof Paul Hodges on pain and altered

2018 Body in Mind blog

271. Editor’s picks: When pain kills – chronic pain and chronic diseases

their future. Study recruitment is being conducted separately for both young people and parents. Please email if you would like to take part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help (...) Editor’s picks: When pain kills – chronic pain and chronic diseases Editor’s picks: When pain kills – chronic pain and chronic diseases • Body in Mind Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain Editor’s picks: When pain kills – chronic pain and chronic diseases January 9, 2018 by Over this holiday season we are publishing our Editor’s picks of 2017 for you to read and enjoy again. — One high profile campaign to raise awareness of persistent pain uses the tagline ‘persistent

2018 Body in Mind blog

272. Editor’s picks: Pain after cancer: A new model for pain psychology?

– to decide how much danger the body is in. The brain then produces an output based on all this information, the feeling of pain , to reflect that danger. Importantly, how we interpret painful sensations is an integral part of assigning meaning and making sense of those experiences. So if pain is about threat – if it’s about meaning – an ideal model to study pain would be one where there is little tissue damage but a high level of perceived danger. Scientists have played around with this idea in the lab (...) professionals give to patients following cancer treatment aren’t always helpful. A common message is “listen to your body; you know your body and when something isn’t right”. But if pain science has taught us anything over the last decade, it’s that . Our body, indeed our brain, can play tricks on us depending on the information we receive from the external world, through those pesky emotion and memory systems, and through our interpretation of those body sensations. I’m going to preempt what you’re

2018 Body in Mind blog

273. Editor’s picks: How does watching a parent in pain impact children’s own pain experiences?

and parents of young people with CRPS to complete a 20-25 online survey which asks them to think about their future. Study recruitment is being conducted separately for both young people and parents. Please email if you would like to take part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic (...) pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain condition. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes and the responses are anonymous. Prof Paul Hodges on pain and altered movement Am I safe to move? Listen to Lorimer Moseley talk to Karim Khan on new

2018 Body in Mind blog

274. A Journey to Learn about Pain – a book about pain education for children

about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS researcher Janet Bultitude find out by responding to her . The survey is aimed at people with CRPS, people with chronic pain conditions other than CRPS, and people without any chronic pain condition. The survey takes approximately 20 minutes and the responses are anonymous. Prof Paul Hodges on pain (...) A Journey to Learn about Pain – a book about pain education for children A Journey to Learn about Pain - a book about pain education for children Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain A Journey to Learn about Pain – a book about pain education for children November 9, 2018 by Persistent pain in children is an increasingly recognized clinical problem with high prevalence rates found in some populations. A conservative estimate posits that 20% to 35% of children

2018 Body in Mind blog

275. Pain After Cancer: A New Model for Pain Psychology?

that pain is all about meaning . Pain is about perceiving threat and danger to the body . – including from the external and internal world through our senses, and from within brain centres that encode things like emotion and memory – to decide how much danger the body is in. The brain then produces an output based on all this information, the feeling of pain , to reflect that danger. Importantly, how we interpret painful sensations is an integral part of assigning meaning and making sense of those (...) our brain, can play tricks on us depending on the information we receive from the external world, through those pesky emotion and memory systems, and through our interpretation of those body sensations. I’m going to preempt what you’re thinking now: of course, the most important thing is not to miss a cancer recurrence. We should never ignore pain for so long that we miss signs that the cancer has truly returned, therefore missing an opportunity for early intervention. But this isn’t the only

2017 Journal of Medical Ethics blog

276. Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 1

. Study recruitment is being conducted separately for both young people and parents. Please email if you would like to take part. Participants will be paid for their time. It’s impossible to slip your disc! Lorimer Moseley answering the question “What is the thing that annoys you most when we talk about back pain?” Online survey on bodily changes, sensations, and mood in people with chronic pain How do CRPS and other chronic pain conditions affect bodily functions, sensations, and mood? Help CRPS (...) Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 1 Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain - reflections on Traeger et al. part 1 Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain Explaining Pain for Acute Back Pain – reflections on Traeger et al. part 1 November 27, 2018 by The PREVENT trial published recently in seems to have created a storm. If views and tweets and general social noise are your metric, then this one weighs in pretty well – over 15K views

2018 Body in Mind blog

277. Buffering local anaesthetics to reduce dental injection pain?

sensations during injection of anaesthetics. A potential cause of this is the acidic nature of the local anaesthetic solution. It has been suggested that alkalisation of local anaesthesia with buffering agents hey reduce pain and speed anaesthesia onsets period The aim of this review is to investigate the efficacy of buffering local anaesthetics in reducing infiltration pain and anaesthesia onset time in dentistry. Methods Searches were conducted in the Medline, Embase, Scopus and SCIELO databases (...) Buffering local anaesthetics to reduce dental injection pain? Buffering local anaesthetics to reduce dental injection pain? - National Elf Service Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » Buffering local anaesthetics to reduce dental injection pain? Feb 28 2018 Posted by Local anaesthesia is essential in order to perform the wide range of dental procedures carried out daily in dental practices. While they help to control pain patients often report burning and stinging

2018 The Dental Elf

278. Knee pain - assessment

arthritis). Rapid onset (within 2 hours) of a large tense effusion following trauma suggests fracture, ligament rupture (usually the anterior cruciate ligament) or patellar dislocation. Slower onset (24-36 hours) of a mild to moderate effusion is consistent with meniscal injury or ligament sprain. Joint stiffness, and variation throughout the day. History of locking or giving way. Ripping or tearing sensations. Crepitus, snapping, or clicking are of limited value in identifying the cause of knee pain (...) pain Most commonly presents in teenage years or in young adulthood. Symptoms: Anterior knee pain, often behind the patella, that is: Diffuse and aching. Gradual in onset. Aggravated by ascending or descending stairs, squatting or sitting for prolonged periods. Sensation of 'giving way'. This is not true instability, which occurs in meniscal or ligamentous injury. Reported crepitus and/or stiffness. Signs: There are no features specific to patellofemoral pain. Range of movement is usually normal

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

279. Chest pain

. Signs — may be associated with paraesthesia or hyperaesthesia, but with no objective loss of sensation or muscle strength. To confirm a diagnosis of neck pain, see the scenario in the prodigy topic . Other causes of chest pain include: Psychogenic or non-specific chest pain History — the person has no identifiable risk factors for a physical cause of chest pain. Anxiety disorders are common, especially panic disorders. The episode is often preceded by a stressful event. Symptoms — chest pain (...) is usually in the left sub-mammary position (without radiation). The pain is sharp and continuous. The pain is aggravated by tiredness and stress, and may be associated with symptoms of hyperventilation (including tingling of the extremities) and palpitations. Herpes zoster Symptoms — prodrome (one to five days before the development of rash), abnormal sensation (for example burning, tingling, or itch) in the affected skin, there may also be headache, malaise, and photophobia. Signs — painful

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

280. Mindfulness Training for Chronic Pain Management: A Review of the Clinical Evidence and Guidelines

Mindfulness Training for Chronic Pain Management: A Review of the Clinical Evidence and Guidelines Disclaimer: The Rapid Response Service is an information service for those involved in planning and providing health care in Canada. Rapid responses are based on a limited literature search and are not comprehensive, systematic reviews. The intent is to provide a list of sources and a summary of the best evidence on the topic that CADTH could identify using all reasonable efforts within the time (...) is given to CADTH. Links: This report may contain links to other information available on the websites of third parties on the Internet. CADTH does not have control over the content of such sites. Use of third party sites is governed by the owners’ own terms and conditions. TITLE: Mindfulness Training for Chronic Pain Management: A Review of the Clinical Evidence and Guidelines DATE: 12 January 2012 CONTEXT AND POLICY ISSUES Chronic pain has been defined as persistent pain, which can be either

2012 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>