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Orbital Cellulitis

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1. Peri-orbital and orbital cellulitis

Peri-orbital and orbital cellulitis Peri-orbital and orbital cellulitis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Peri-orbital and orbital cellulitis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: March 2018 Summary Peri-orbital cellulitis is an infectious process occurring in the eyelid tissues superficial to (anterior to or above) the orbital septum. It is usually due to superficial tissue injury (e.g., insect (...) bite or chalazion). Orbital cellulitis is an infectious process affecting the muscles and fat within the orbit, posterior or deep to the orbital septum, not involving the globe. It is usually due to underlying bacterial sinusitis. Peri-orbital cellulitis is of concern in children because it may be secondary to occult underlying bacterial sinusitis or, rarely, due to bacteraemic spread from a primary infection (e.g., pneumonia), and may rapidly progress to orbital cellulitis in children

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Orbital apex syndrome from bacterial sinusitis without orbital cellulitis (PubMed)

Orbital apex syndrome from bacterial sinusitis without orbital cellulitis To describe a case of orbital apex syndrome as a result of isolated bacterial sinusitis.A 63-year-old woman presented with an orbital apex syndrome from isolated bacterial sinusitis with rapidly declining visual acuity to no light perception. We compared our case with 6 similar cases of severe vision loss from isolated bacterial sinusitis. In contrast to previously published cases, our patient presented with good vision (...) yet deteriorated to no light perception despite appropriate treatment.Orbital apex syndrome can present as a constellation of cranial neuropathies including optic neuropathy from conditions affecting the orbital apex. Although vision loss remained permanent, prompt initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics and antifungals and surgical intervention prevented further extension of infection into intracranial structures.

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2018 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

4. C-reactive protein may be useful to differentiate idiopathic orbital inflammation and orbital cellulitis in cases with acute eyelid erythema and edema (PubMed)

C-reactive protein may be useful to differentiate idiopathic orbital inflammation and orbital cellulitis in cases with acute eyelid erythema and edema Idiopathic orbital inflammation (IOI) and orbital cellulitis can present similar clinical features, and the diagnoses of these two disorders are sometimes confused. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether or not inflammatory markers in the blood can be useful to differentiate between IOI and orbital cellulitis in cases (...) and edema, and were initially misdiagnosed as orbital cellulitis. Thus, inflammatory markers in the blood (ie, white blood cells [WBCs] and C-reactive protein [CRP]) of those 15 patients were analyzed with 17 patients (10 males, 7 females) having orbital cellulitis. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal cut-off values.The mean ± standard error (SE) levels of the WBC were 6.80±0.70×103/μL in the IOI patients, and 8.54±0.91×103/μL in the orbital

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2018 Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.)

5. Orbital Cellulitis from an Orbital Compressed Air and Diesel Explosion Injury (PubMed)

Orbital Cellulitis from an Orbital Compressed Air and Diesel Explosion Injury 29611376 2018 08 10 2018 11 14 2092-9382 32 2 2018 04 Korean journal of ophthalmology : KJO Korean J Ophthalmol Orbital Cellulitis from an Orbital Compressed Air and Diesel Explosion Injury. 158-159 10.3341/kjo.2017.0135 Bae Kyoung Hwa KH Department of Ophthalmology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Korea. Cho Nam Chun NC Department of Ophthalmology, Chonbuk National University Medical School (...) diagnostic imaging etiology therapy Gasoline Glucocorticoids therapeutic use Humans Magnetic Resonance Imaging Male Methylprednisolone therapeutic use Orbit injuries Orbital Cellulitis diagnosis etiology therapy Therapeutic Irrigation Tomography, X-Ray Computed No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported. 2018 4 4 6 0 2018 8 11 6 0 2018 4 4 6 0 ppublish 29611376 32.e26 10.3341/kjo.2017.0135 PMC5906403 Am J Ophthalmol. 1999 Jul;128(1):103-4 10482105 Korean J Ophthalmol. 2010

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2018 Korean journal of ophthalmology : KJO

6. Case report of the family transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes orbital cellulitis (PubMed)

Case report of the family transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes orbital cellulitis This is a case report of an unusual case of the family transmission of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in three siblings. One brother contracted the infection which resulted in orbital cellulitis of two of his siblings, in the absence of anatomical or immunological predisposing factors.A young boy contracted an uncomplicated S pyogenes upper respiratory tract infection. The twin brother closely followed (...) by the older sister both developed a S pyogenes orbital cellulitis a couple of days later.To our knowledge, this is the first case ever reported of family transmission of orbital cellulitis. This highlights the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of S pyogenes, and the role of throat cultures as means of diagnosis even in the absence of symptoms or signs of pharyngitis.

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2017 American journal of ophthalmology case reports

7. Pediatric preseptal and orbital cellulitis: A 10-year experience. (PubMed)

Pediatric preseptal and orbital cellulitis: A 10-year experience. Characterize clinical features, epidemiology and treatment of hospitalized pediatric cases of preseptal and orbital cellulitis.Retrospective study of children/adolescents admitted to a central hospital with preseptal and orbital cellulitis between 2007 and 2017.A total of 122 cases were included, 80.3% with preseptal cellulitis and 19.7% with orbital cellulitis. Patients had a median age of 5 years. Sinusitis was the most common (...) predisposing factor (40.2%), followed by dental abscess (20.4%) in preseptal cellulitis and by external ocular infections (12.5%) in orbital cellulitis. Sinusitis (p < 0.001) was associated with orbital cellulitis, whereas patients with dental abscess (p = 0.007) and trauma (p = 0.040) were most likely to have preseptal cellulitis. Fever, photophobia, ocular pain, painful eye movements, proptosis, rhinorrhea and vison impairment were related with orbital cellulitis. Leukocytosis was present in 34.4

2019 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

8. Trend of surgery for orbital cellulitis: An analysis of state inpatient databases. (PubMed)

Trend of surgery for orbital cellulitis: An analysis of state inpatient databases. To evaluate the trend and factors associated with surgical management of orbital cellulitis.Retrospective database study.Study using the State Inpatient Databases (SIDs) from 2008 to 2015. Patients with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis code for orbital cellulitis were identified in the SIDs for the following states: Arkansas, Florida, Iowa (...) , Maryland, Nebraska, New York, and Wisconsin. Surgery was defined as an ICD-9-CM procedure code for orbitotomy and/or functional endoscopic sinus surgery. The trend of surgery over time was evaluated using the Cochran-Armitage test. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify patient- and hospital-level factors associated with surgery.From 2008 to 2013, the number of hospitalizations for orbital cellulitis ranged from 1,349 to 1,574, but declined to 865 in 2014. From 2008 to 2015

2019 Laryngoscope

9. Rapid onset of orbital cellulitis after uncomplicated strabismus surgery. (PubMed)

Rapid onset of orbital cellulitis after uncomplicated strabismus surgery. Orbital cellulitis is extremely uncommon following strabismus surgery. When it occurs, the infection has been reported to present from day 1 to within 1 week following surgery and has the potential for significant morbidity. We report the case of a 6.5-year-old boy presenting with unilateral orbital cellulitis growing group A Streptococcus pyogenes on postoperative day 1, after uncomplicated bilateral medial rectus (...) recessions. The patient had two contacts with streptococcal pharyngitis at the time of surgery but was completely asymptomatic himself. We hypothesize that these contacts may have led to the rapid onset of his orbital cellulitis.Copyright © 2019 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2019 JAAPOS - Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

10. Management of orbital cellulitis and subperiosteal orbital abscess in pediatric patients: A ten-year review. (PubMed)

Management of orbital cellulitis and subperiosteal orbital abscess in pediatric patients: A ten-year review. Pediatric periorbital cellulitis represents a common disease complicating a nasal infection.A ten-year retrospective review of fifty-seven children admitted to our institution with the diagnosis of periorbital cellulitis as a complication of sinus infections was carried out.The age varied from one month to eleven years (mean 3.9 years). Thirty-five were males (62%), while twenty-two were (...) %).Medical management is the main treatment for both preseptal and postseptal orbital cellulitis. Nevertheless, there is no universally accepted guideline for the treatment of subperiosteal abscesses and each case should be treated accordingly. Urgent surgical drainage should be considered in cases not responding to adequate medical management, or those cases presenting visual deterioration.Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2017 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

11. Cellulitis and erysipelas: antimicrobial prescribing

dermatitis or deep vein thrombosis any underlying condition that may predispose to cellulitis or erysipelas, such as oedema, diabetes, venous insufficiency or eczema any symptoms or signs suggesting a more serious illness or condition, such as lymphangitis, orbital cellulitis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, necrotising fasciitis or sepsis any results from microbiological testing any previous antibiotic use, which may have led to resistant bacteria. 1.1.11 Consider taking a swab for microbiological (...) if they have any symptoms or signs suggesting a more serious illness or condition, such as orbital cellulitis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, necrotising fasciitis or sepsis. 1.1.14 Consider referring people with cellulitis or erysipelas to hospital, or seek specialist advice, if they: are severely unwell or or have infection near the eyes or nose (including periorbital cellulitis) or or could have uncommon pathogens, for example, after a penetrating injury, exposure to water-borne organisms

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

12. Temporal Expression of Genes in Biofilm-Forming Ocular Candida albicans Isolated From Patients With Keratitis and Orbital Cellulitis. (PubMed)

Temporal Expression of Genes in Biofilm-Forming Ocular Candida albicans Isolated From Patients With Keratitis and Orbital Cellulitis. To study antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm-forming potential of ocular isolates of Candida albicans along with gene expression.Seven clinical isolates of C. albicans (keratitis-6 and orbital cellulitis-1) were evaluated. Biofilm formation in one isolate was monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM

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2018 Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science

13. Management of pediatric orbital cellulitis: A systematic review. (PubMed)

Management of pediatric orbital cellulitis: A systematic review. Orbital complications account for 74-85% of all complications from acute sinusitis, more often affect the pediatric population, and can result in devastating consequences. Therefore these patients require prompt diagnosis and proper management. We review and summarize the current literature to determine the appropriate management of each stage of pediatric orbital cellulitis and offer a new comprehensive literature-based (...) algorithm.Data sources were PubMed/MEDLINE, and Google Scholar. Studies relevant to the management of each subcategory of the Chandler criteria in the pediatric population, limited to the period 1997 through Jan 2018, were compiled and interpreted. Seventy-one studies were reviewed in total.Pre-septal and post-septal cellulitis can generally be managed non-surgically, while orbital abscess and cavernous sinus thrombosis are managed surgically. For subperiosteal abscess, non-surgical medical management has

2018 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

14. Clostridium perfringens panophthalmitis and orbital cellulitis: a case report. (PubMed)

Clostridium perfringens panophthalmitis and orbital cellulitis: a case report. Clostridium perfringens is an uncommon pathogen in endophthalmitis, causing rapid destruction of ocular tissues. Clostridium perfringens infection typically occurs after penetrating injury with soil-contaminated foreign bodies.Here, we describe the case of a 17-year-old male who sustained a penetrating injury with a metallic intraocular foreign body and who rapidly developed severe C. perfringens panophthalmitis (...) with orbital cellulitis. He was managed by systemic and intravitreal antibiotics, resulting in preservation of the globe, but a poor visual outcome.Clostridial endophthalmitis secondary to penetrating injuries is a fulminant infection, almost always resulting in loss of the globe in the case of advanced infection. When feasible, early vitrectomy and intravitreal antibiotics should be considered in patients with penetrating eye injuries with contaminated foreign bodies.

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2018 BMC Ophthalmology

15. Nasal septal abscess as a sequela of orbital cellulitis: An uncommon presentation (PubMed)

Nasal septal abscess as a sequela of orbital cellulitis: An uncommon presentation Nasal septal abscess is a rather unusual condition encountered in the Otorhinolaryngology outpatient department, let alone it being a complication of orbital cellulitis! The condition usually occurs due to trauma which is significant enough to cause a septal haematoma. The haematoma then eventually results in formation of a localised abscess. Orbital cellulitis as a sequela of nasal septal abscess (...) is an established complication but vice versa, septal abscess as a sequela of orbital cellulitis is an extremely rare presentation. To emphasise the possibility of anterograde as well as retrograde passage of infection via valveless veins in the face, we report a unique case of a 2-month-old infant who developed nasal septal abscess as a complication of orbital cellulitis.

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2018 SAGE Open Medical Case Reports

16. Acute dacryocystitis complicated by orbital cellulitis and loss of vision: A case report and review of the literature (PubMed)

Acute dacryocystitis complicated by orbital cellulitis and loss of vision: A case report and review of the literature Acute dacryocystitis usually presents as a pre-septal cellulitis since the lacrimal sac lies anterior to the orbital septum. Orbital cellulitis secondary to acute dacryocystitis is very rare due to a variety of anatomic barriers to the orbit but can occur and result in abscess formation with risk of visual compromise.We describe a case of otherwise healthy adult who presented (...) with complete visual loss following orbital cellulitis and abscess formation secondary to acute dacryocystitis. The clinical, radiological, intraoperative and postoperative findings are discussed.Typically, orbital cellulitis responds well to systemic antibiotic and surgical drainage without permanent visual loss. There are 7 cases reported in the literature of acute dacryocystitis complicated by permanent visual loss.Patients with acute dacryocystitis need to be carefully monitored for signs of orbital

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2018 International journal of surgery case reports

17. Klebsiella pneumoniae Orbital Cellulitis: Clinical Manifestations and Outcomes in a Tertiary Medical Center in Taiwan (PubMed)

Klebsiella pneumoniae Orbital Cellulitis: Clinical Manifestations and Outcomes in a Tertiary Medical Center in Taiwan To report six cases of Klebsiella pneumoniae orbital cellulitis without preceding endophthalmitis.Retrospective chart review.We reported four females and two males admitted to our hospital for Klebsiella pneumoniae orbital cellulitis proven by computed tomographies and bacterial cultures from May 1995 to March 2017. Proptosis, conjunctival congestion, and chemosis and limitation (...) of ocular motility were present in all six patients. Four patients had decreased visual acuities, and three of them recovered completely after treatment. The origin of the infection was sinus in four patients, skin wound in one patient, and sepsis presumably caused by a dental procedure in one patient. Three of all six patients had underlying diabetes mellitus. Two patients had orbital cellulitis before they were diagnosed of diabetes during hospital stay.Diabetes may be a risk factor of Klebsiella

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2018 Journal of ophthalmology

18. Emergency management: orbital cellulitis (PubMed)

Emergency management: orbital cellulitis 30487680 2018 12 07 0953-6833 31 103 2018 Community eye health Community Eye Health Emergency management: orbital cellulitis. 60 Kyari Fatima F Consultant Ophthalmologist Medical Education Coordinator, Baze University, Abuja, Nigeria. eng Journal Article England Community Eye Health 8912615 0953-6833 2018 11 30 6 0 2018 11 30 6 0 2018 11 30 6 1 ppublish 30487680 PMC6253316 Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol. 2010 Apr;17(2):134-7 20616919 Middle East Afr J

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2018 Community Eye Health

19. Trigeminal Trophic Syndrome Leading to Orbital Cellulitis (PubMed)

Trigeminal Trophic Syndrome Leading to Orbital Cellulitis Trigeminal trophic syndrome is a rare condition that develops from trigeminal nerve damage causing dysesthesias that result in self-mutilation. Facial and nasal destruction develops from self-destructive behavior (repetitive picking or scratching) secondary to the altered skin sensation created by the damaged trigeminal nerve. Early recognition of this condition is crucial to the prevention of the detrimental complications of facial (...) ulceration and nasal tissue necrosis that can lead to corneal ulcerations, full-thickness eyelid defect, and canthal lesions. This case demonstrates a previously unreported complication: orbital cellulitis.

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2018 Clinical Practice and Cases in Emergency Medicine

20. Elevated Optic Disc Height and Increased Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter on Bedside Ultrasound in a Pediatric Patient With Orbital Cellulitis: More Than Meets the Eye. (PubMed)

Elevated Optic Disc Height and Increased Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter on Bedside Ultrasound in a Pediatric Patient With Orbital Cellulitis: More Than Meets the Eye. Orbital cellulitis is an uncommon ophthalmological emergency in children, but rapid emergency department (ED) diagnosis is essential.A 13-year-old boy presented to our pediatric ED with left orbital cellulitis secondary to pansinusitis. Emergency bedside ocular ultrasonography was used to evaluate and expedite his management. Besides (...) inflammatory changes observed on ultrasound of his affected orbit, the patient had an elevated optic disc height and increased nerve sheath diameter, which were not commonly reported in published literature on orbital cellulitis. Emergent computed tomography of the orbits and head showed orbital cellulitis without complications of orbital abscess or cavernous sinus thrombosis. Despite initiating early appropriate antibiotics, there was rapid progression of his disease and he developed intraconal abscess

2018 Journal of Emergency Medicine

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