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Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation

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1. Imatinib-induced diffuse hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa, the skin, and the nails in a patient affected by chronic myeloid leukemia: report of a case and review of the literature. (PubMed)

Imatinib-induced diffuse hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa, the skin, and the nails in a patient affected by chronic myeloid leukemia: report of a case and review of the literature. Imatinib mesylate is a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor used as the first-line treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but it is also indicated for other hematological diseases and solid tumors. Imatinib treatment is often associated with hypopigmentation, but only a few cases of hyperpigmentation are described (...) in literature.We are reporting the first case of imatinib-related hyperpigmentation involving the oral mucosa, skin, and nails in a patient affected by chronic myeloid leukemia and treated with imatinib since 2002. A review of all the available literature regarding the imatinib-related hyperpigmentation was performed, and one additional case was analyzed. Due to the possibility of a post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, all cases of pigmentary changes previously characterized by a rash and/or pruritus

2018 International Journal of Dermatology

2. Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation

Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Oral Mucosa (...) Hyperpigmentation Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation Aka: Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation , Melanin Pigmentation of Oral Mucosa From Related Chapters II. Causes May be associated with in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy- -ectodermal dystrophy syndrome Darker pigmentation related to ethnicity abuse 1 McCune-Albright Syndrome Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation." Click on the image (or right click) to open

2018 FP Notebook

3. Hyperpigmentation of the hard palate mucosa in a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia taking imatinib (PubMed)

of a 63-year-old Caucasian male with widespread hyperpigmentation of the hard palate associated with a 9-year history of imatinib therapy to treat CML. He did not complain of any symptoms. Clinical examination did not reveal any abnormal pigmentation of the skin or other region of the oral mucosa. He did not smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol. His medication regimen was a proton pump inhibitor, a beta-blocker, cardioaspirin, atorvastatin, and imatinib 400 mg/day. Histopathologically, melanin (...) Hyperpigmentation of the hard palate mucosa in a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia taking imatinib Imatinib mesylate is an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl and a first-line treatment for Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Dermatological side effects include superficial oedema, pustular eruption, lichenoid reactions, erythroderma, and skin rash. Depigmentation of the skin and/or mucosa is uncommon, and hyperpigmentation is rare.We present the case

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2017 Maxillofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

4. Toxic Side Effects of Targeted Therapies and Immunotherapies Affecting the Skin, Oral Mucosa, Hair, and Nails. (PubMed)

Toxic Side Effects of Targeted Therapies and Immunotherapies Affecting the Skin, Oral Mucosa, Hair, and Nails. Targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with a wide range of dermatologic adverse events (dAEs) resulting from common signaling pathways involved in malignant behavior and normal homeostatic functions of the epidermis and dermis. Dermatologic toxicities include damage to the skin, oral mucosa, hair, and nails. Acneiform rash is the most common dAE, observed in 25-85 (...) , and pruritus. Of the oral mucosal toxicities observed with targeted therapies, oral mucositis is the most frequent with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, followed by stomatitis associated to multikinase angiogenesis and HER inhibitors, geographic tongue, oral hyperkeratotic lesions, lichenoid reactions, and hyperpigmentation. ICIs typically induce oral lichenoid reactions and xerostomia. Targeted therapies and endocrine therapy also commonly induce alopecia, although this is still

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2018 American journal of clinical dermatology

5. Hyperpigmentation with Capecitabine: Part of Hand-Foot Syndrome or a Separate Entity? (PubMed)

of a patient with capecitabine-induced Hand-Foot Syndrome (HFS), who also presented with hyperpigmentation of the hands, feet, oral mucosa, and face. (...) Hyperpigmentation with Capecitabine: Part of Hand-Foot Syndrome or a Separate Entity? Capecitabine has several side effects, most common of which is Hand-Foot syndrome (HFS); however, less frequently reported is capecitabine-associated hyperpigmentation. The hyperpigmentation associated with this drug has been documented to involve the hands and feet and, less commonly, the mucous membranes of the mouth. To our knowledge, it has never been documented to involve the face. We report a case

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2018 Cureus

6. Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation

Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Oral Mucosa (...) Hyperpigmentation Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation Aka: Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation , Melanin Pigmentation of Oral Mucosa From Related Chapters II. Causes May be associated with in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy- -ectodermal dystrophy syndrome Darker pigmentation related to ethnicity abuse 1 McCune-Albright Syndrome Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Oral Mucosa Hyperpigmentation." Click on the image (or right click) to open

2015 FP Notebook

7. Hyperpigmentation of hard palate induced by chloroquine therapy (PubMed)

Hyperpigmentation of hard palate induced by chloroquine therapy The antimalarials are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for conditions such as lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, and the side effects, though infrequent, are well known. The antimalarial agent chloroquine diphosphate usually causes pigmentary changes in the oral mucosa characterized by a bluish-grey to black discolorations mainly in the hard palate. Considering only the hard palate hyperpigmentation caused (...) by chloroquine, to the best of our knowledge, only 13 cases have been reported in the English language literature. We described an additional case of palate hyperpigmentation related to the chronic use of chloroquine diphosphate in a 60-year-old Mexican woman. Although the diagnosis is usually made based on medication history and clinical presentation, a biopsy specimen may be helpful to confirm the diagnosis. Clinicians must be aware of these drugs and their adverse effects in order to make the correct

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2017 Journal of clinical and experimental dentistry

8. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome: a case of asymptomatic mucosal and acral hyperpigmentation (PubMed)

Laugier-Hunziker syndrome: a case of asymptomatic mucosal and acral hyperpigmentation Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS) is a rare condition characterized by acquired hyperpigmentation involving the lips, oral mucosa, acral surfaces, nails and perineum. While patients with LHS may manifest pigmentation in all of the aforementioned areas, most present with pigmentation localized to only a few of these anatomical sites. We herein report a patient exhibiting the characteristic pigment distribution (...) pattern associated with LHS. Since LHS is a diagnosis based on exclusion, we discuss the differential diagnosis of mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation. Due to the benign nature of the disease, it is critical to differentiate this disorder from conditions with similar mucocutaneous pigmentary changes with somatic abnormalities that require medical management. We also explore potential mechanisms that may explain the pathogenesis of LHS.

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2017 Dermatology practical & conceptual

9. Unusual case of hyperpigmentation secondary to irinotecan (PubMed)

Unusual case of hyperpigmentation secondary to irinotecan 27793873 2017 03 06 2018 12 02 1757-790X 2016 2016 Oct 28 BMJ case reports BMJ Case Rep Unusual case of hyperpigmentation secondary to irinotecan. bcr2016217545 10.1136/bcr-2016-217545 Nestor Laura Aisling LA Department of Dermatology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Ireland. Flint Stephen S Department of Oral Medicine and Dentistry, Dublin Dental School and Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Galvin Sheila S Department of Oral Medicine (...) & dosage Colorectal Neoplasms therapy Drug Eruptions etiology Female Humans Hyperpigmentation chemically induced Irinotecan Middle Aged Mouth Mucosa Nails Neoplasm Recurrence, Local drug therapy Conflicts of Interest: None declared. 2016 10 30 6 0 2017 3 7 6 0 2016 10 30 6 0 epublish 27793873 bcr-2016-217545 10.1136/bcr-2016-217545 PMC5093355 Drug Discov Today Dis Mech. 2008;5(2):e189-e199 19578486 J Pharm Bioallied Sci. 2015 Aug;7(Suppl 2):S403-8 26538887

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2016 BMJ case reports

10. Case Report: Dermoscopic features of oral lichen planus - the evolution of mucoscopy (PubMed)

, the dermoscopic features of oral lichen planus with hand-held or videodermoscopy remain to be elucidated. We present the case of a young adult man who presented with asymptomatic white lacy lesions over a bluish-black background over the tongue, patchy hyperpigmentation of the buccal mucosae and gingivae, and longitudinal melanonychia involving some nails. History of intake of any drugs preceding the lesions, smoking, chewing of betel nut and dental implants was negative. Family history was non-contributory (...) . There were no cutaneous lesions suggestive of lichen planus. Mucoscopy (dermoscopy of the mucosa, oral in this case) and onychoscopy were done followed by biopsy from the tongue that confirmed the diagnosis of lichen planus. Oral mucoscopy of the tongue revealed a tri-colored pattern with structureless veil-like grey-white areas (modified Wickham's striae), well-demarcated red glossy erosions, and violaceous-to-brown clods. Additionally, vascular pattern of dotted and linear to curved vessels along

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2018 F1000Research

11. Secondary hyperpigmentation during interferon alfa treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus infection. (PubMed)

with hyperpigmentation. Hyperpigmentation of the oral mucous membrane, acquired longitudinal melononychia, and hyperpigmentation of the face were each observed in 7 patients (9%). All patients with hyperpigmentation of the skin had skin type III or IV and worked outside without sun protection. The intensity of pigmentation was reported to decrease progressively when interferon treatment was discontinued. Most patients with hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa also had melanonychia. However, patients (...) Secondary hyperpigmentation during interferon alfa treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Interferon alfa remains the central treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Cases of cutaneous and mucous hyperpigmentations during interferon alfa treatment have been reported, but they are considered rare adverse effects.To study the clinical presentation and frequency of hyperpigmentation in patients receiving interferon alfa treatment for chronic HCV infection.Prospective

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2013 JAMA dermatology (Chicago, Ill.)

12. Clinicopathological Profile and Malignant Transformation in Oral Lichen Planus: A Retrospective Study (PubMed)

Clinicopathological Profile and Malignant Transformation in Oral Lichen Planus: A Retrospective Study The aim of this study was to analyze the histopathologically diagnosed cases of oral lichen planus (OLP) in terms of age, gender, clinical variant, site, hyperpigmentation, systemic illness, grade of dysplasia, and associated malignant transformation. This study also intended to do a review of reported cases of OLP with malignant transformation.One hundred and forty-three cases (...) and histopathologically as OLP developed oral squamous cell carcinoma.The present investigation revealed the predominance of OLP among middle-aged male population and the prevalence of bilateral involvement of buccal mucosa. Two of our cases showed malignant transformation over an average period of 3.5 years. The outcome of this study emphasizes the role of clinical follow-up of patients with OLP.

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2017 Journal of International Society of Preventive & Community Dentistry

13. Hyperpigmentation in Laugier–Hunziker syndrome (PubMed)

Case Reports Journal Article 2011 08 08 Canada CMAJ 9711805 0820-3946 AIM IM Female Humans Hyperpigmentation pathology Lip pathology Middle Aged Mouth Mucosa pathology Nail Diseases pathology Syndrome Tongue pathology 2011 8 10 6 0 2011 8 10 6 0 2011 12 13 0 0 ppublish 21825050 cmaj.110211 10.1503/cmaj.110211 PMC3168631 Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod. 2003 Sep;96(3):288-92 12973285 Gut. 2010 Jul;59(7):975-86 20581245 Int J Dermatol. 2004 Aug;43(8):571-4 15304179 (...) Hyperpigmentation in Laugier–Hunziker syndrome 21825050 2011 12 07 2018 11 13 1488-2329 183 12 2011 Sep 06 CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne CMAJ Hyperpigmentation in Laugier-Hunziker syndrome. 1402 10.1503/cmaj.110211 Ma Dong-Lai DL Department of Dermatology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. mdonglai@public3.bta.net.cn Vano-Galvan Sergio S eng

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2011 CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association Journal

14. Hyperpigmentation

years of use ("rebound hyperpigmentation") Phenothiazines, including chlorpromazine Grayish blue discoloration on sun-exposed areas; golden-brown granules in upper dermis Tetracyclines, particularly minocycline Grayish discoloration of teeth, nails, sclerae, oral mucosa, acne scars, face, forearms, and lower legs Heavy metals Bismuth Blue-gray discoloration of face, neck, and hands Gold Blue-gray deposits around the eyes (chrysiasis) Mercury Slate-gray discoloration of skinfolds Silver Diffuse slate (...) complexes (usually slate or bluish gray) Drugs may cause secondary hyperpigmentation. For example, focal hyperpigmentation frequently occurs after drug-induced (also known as lichenoid drug eruption). Table Hyperpigmentation Effects of Some Drugs and Chemicals Substance Effect Drugs Amiodarone Slate-gray to violaceous discoloration of sun-exposed areas; yellowish brown deposits in the dermis Antimalarials Yellow-brown to gray to bluish black discoloration of pretibial areas, face, oral cavity, and nails

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

15. Oral findings in chronic kidney disease: implications for management in developing countries. (PubMed)

, interviewed and examined. Oral mucosa assessment was based on the WHO Guide to Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Oral Mucosal Diseases. Urinalysis and blood creatinine levels were determined. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of each patient was calculated from the blood creatinine using Cockcroft and Gault formula.Oral lesions were present in 86 out of 90 (96.5%) CKD patients compared with 15 out of 90 (16.7%) controls (p < 0.001). Abnormal lip hyperpigmentation was the most frequently seen lesion in 81 out (...) Oral findings in chronic kidney disease: implications for management in developing countries. The importance of oral health care in the management of patients with systemic diseases including chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been affirmed. Many CKD patients have related oral lesions, however, attention to oral health care has been lacking, especially in the developing countries with higher burden of renal diseases.One hundred and eighty patients, 90 cases and 90 controls were recruited

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2015 BMC Oral Health

16. Disorders of Oral Pigmentation (Diagnosis)

pigmentation due to intrinsic processes Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by intestinal hamartomatous polyps in association with mucocutaneous melanocytic macules. Pigmented macules, often confluent and varying in size and shades of brown, appear in almost all cases periorally and on the lips and buccal mucosae. Any oral site may be involved, and the degree of pigmentation and oral involvement vary among affected individuals. Pigmented macules on the cutaneous surfaces (...) extraction or other surgical procedure, including the deliberate placement of amalgam into the apical canal of a root during endodontic surgery. These quickly become blackened and may impart a black discoloration to the adjacent bone. Oral pigmentation due to hyperplastic or neoplastic processes Melanotic macules may be solitary or multiple and can involve the gingiva, lip, as shown below, palate, buccal mucosa, and alveolar ridge, as shown below. Microscopically, this melanin deposit is mainly

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Oral Manifestations of Systemic Diseases (Treatment)

” appearance. [ ] Oral manifestations are observed in approximately 15-25% of patients. In the majority of these patients, there is a blue-gray hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa. [ ] The most commonly affected sites are the buccal mucosa and gingiva, although a minority of patients have diffuse, homogenous pigmentation of the oral cavity. [ , , ] Histologic examination with Prussian blue stain reveals iron mineral deposits. [ ] Also see . Congenital erythropoietic porphyria Congenital erythropoietic (...) =aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA4MTAyOS1vdmVydmlldw== processing > Oral Manifestations of Systemic Diseases Updated: Jun 29, 2018 Author: Heather C Rosengard, MPH; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Oral Manifestations of Systemic Diseases Overview Overview The oral cavity plays a critical role in numerous physiologic processes, including digestion, respiration, and speech. It is also unique for the presence of teeth and mucosa. The mouth is frequently involved in conditions that affect the skin

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Oral Malignant Melanoma (Treatment)

appear in perioral and oral locations as pigmented macules. Addison disease presents as adrenal cortical hypofunction along with splotchy or generalized bronzing of the mucosa and skin. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome has periorificial freckling along with hamartomatous intestinal polyps, and, as a differential diagnosis, Laugier-Hunziker syndrome presents with macular mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation and melanonychia with no known systemic disease association. may range from light brown to blue-black (see (...) Melanoma Updated: Mar 07, 2017 Author: Bobby McManus Collins, II, DDS, MS; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Oral Malignant Melanoma Overview Overview Pigmented entities are relatively common in the oral mucosa and arise from intrinsic and extrinsic sources. Conditions such as , nevi, , amalgam and graphite tattoos, , and vascular blood-related pigments occur with some frequency. Addison disease, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and Laugier-Hunziker syndrome also

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Oral Manifestations of Drug Reactions (Treatment)

to chemotherapeutic agents: part II. An Bras Dermatol . 2010 Oct. 85(5):591-608. . Li CC, Malik SM, Blaeser BF, et al. Mucosal pigmentation caused by imatinib: report of three cases. Head Neck Pathol . 2012 Jun. 6(2):290-5. . . Di Tullio F, Mandel VD, Scotti R, Padalino C, Pellacani G. Imatinib-induced diffuse hyperpigmentation of the oral mucosa, the skin, and the nails in a patient affected by chronic myeloid leukemia: report of a case and review of the literature. Int J Dermatol . 2018 Jul. 57 (7):784-790 (...) the mouth, the lips are the most frequently involved site, followed by the tongue. Among the most common offending agents are ACE inhibitors, penicillin and penicillin derivatives, cephalosporins, barbiturates, and aspirin and other NSAIDs. Affected mucosa typically appears edematous and erythematous within minutes or hours after exposure to the offending drug. Similar contact reactions to latex had become increasingly problematic in oral health care settings until the recent shift towards non-latex

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Oral Melanoacanthoma (Treatment)

, these modalities may jeopardize the microscopic diagnosis. Previous Next: Complications No evidence of malignant transformation has been reported. No complications arise from incisional or excisional biopsy. Previous References Schneider LC, Mesa ML, Haber SM. Melanoacanthoma of the oral mucosa. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol . 1981 Sep. 52(3):284-7. . Wright JM, Binnie WH, Byrd DL, Dunsworth AR. Intraoral melanoacanthoma. J Periodontol . 1983 Feb. 54(2):107-11. . Roh NK, Hahn HJ, Lee YW, Choe YB, Ahn KJ (...) , Contreras E, Netto AC, Mosqueda-Taylor A, Vargas PA, Jorge J, et al. Oral melanoacanthoma and oral melanotic macule: a report of 8 cases, review of the literature, and immunohistochemical analysis. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal . 2007 Sep 1. 12(5):E374-9. . Tomich CE, Zunt SL. Melanoacanthosis (melanoacanthoma) of the oral mucosa. J Dermatol Surg Oncol . 1990 Mar. 16(3):231-6. . Yarom N, Hirshberg A, Buchner A. Solitary and multifocal oral melanoacanthoma. Int J Dermatol . 2007 Dec. 46(12):1232-6

2014 eMedicine.com

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