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Oral Hairy Leukoplakia

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1. Diagnosis of Oral Hairy Leukoplakia: The Importance of EBV In Situ Hybridization (PubMed)

Diagnosis of Oral Hairy Leukoplakia: The Importance of EBV In Situ Hybridization Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which has been related to HIV infection. In situ hybridization (ISH) is the gold-standard diagnosis of OHL, but some authors believe in the possibility of performing the diagnosis based on clinical basis. The aim of this study is diagnose incipient lesions of OHL by EBV ISH of HIV-infected patients and the possible correlations with clinical

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2017 International journal of dentistry

2. Epstein-Barr Virus and Its Association with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia: A Short Review (PubMed)

Epstein-Barr Virus and Its Association with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia: A Short Review In immunocompromised subjects, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of terminally differentiated oral keratinocytes may result in subclinical productive infection of the virus in the stratum spinosum and in the stratum granulosum with shedding of infectious virions into the oral fluid in the desquamating cells. In a minority of cases this productive infection with dysregulation of the cell cycle of terminally (...) differentiated epithelial cells may manifest as oral hairy leukoplakia. This is a white, hyperkeratotic, benign lesion of low morbidity, affecting primarily the lateral border of the tongue. Factors that determine whether productive EBV replication within the oral epithelium will cause oral hairy leukoplakia include the fitness of local immune responses, the profile of EBV gene expression, and local environmental factors.

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2016 International journal of dentistry

3. Oral Hairy Leukoplakia

Oral Hairy Leukoplakia Oral Hairy Leukoplakia Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Oral Hairy Leukoplakia Oral Hairy (...) Leukoplakia Aka: Oral Hairy Leukoplakia , Hairy Leukoplakia From Related Chapters II. Causes ( ) (including HIV) III. Signs Vertical white striations on appear similar to hairs Distributed over lateral dorsum of (unilateral or bilateral) IV. Labs: Indicated if no obvious Immunodeficiency V. Management May respond to antiviral agents (may also recur after course completed) 800 mg 5 times daily for 1-3 weeks Ganciclovir 100 mg 3 times daily for 1-3 weeks VI. References Images: Related links to external

2018 FP Notebook

4. Oral leukoplakia: very limited evidence for treatments

, hairy leukoplakia) have been excluded. The prevalence in the general population ranges between 1-5%. Leukoplakia is one of a group of potentially malignant disorders with a rates of malignant transformation reported to range from 0-36% The aim of this Cochrane review is to assess the effectiveness, safety and acceptability of treatments for leukoplakia in preventing oral cancer. Methods Searches were conducted in the Cochrane Oral Health’s Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled (...) Oral leukoplakia: very limited evidence for treatments Oral leukoplakia: very limited evidence for treatments Search National Elf Service Search National Elf Service » » » » Oral leukoplakia: very limited evidence for treatments Aug 3 2016 Posted by Oral leukoplakia is a white patch found on the oral mucosa that cannot be rubbed off. The term ‘leukoplakia’ should be used when other oral mucosal conditions presenting as white lesions (e.g. frictional keratosis, lichen planus, white sponge nevus

2016 The Dental Elf

5. Critical review of topical management of oral hairy leukoplakia (PubMed)

Critical review of topical management of oral hairy leukoplakia Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is a disease associated with Epstein-Barr virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections. OHL is usually an asymptomatic lesion, but in some cases treatment is recommended to reestablish the normal characteristics of the tongue, to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms, to improve patient comfort and for cosmetic reasons. Proposed treatments for this condition include surgery, systemic antiviral

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2014 World Journal of Clinical Cases : WJCC

6. Oral Leukoplakia

of Epstein-Barr virus is present, the condition is called hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY). Definition (CSP) white patch seen on the oral mucosa; considered a premalignant condition and is often tobacco-induced. Concepts Neoplastic Process ( T191 ) MSH ICD10 SnomedCT 196564008 , 62953009 , 155663006 , 196570002 , 414603003 English Leukoplakias, Oral , Oral Leukoplakias , LEUKOPLAKIA ORAL , Oral mucosa leukoplakia NOS , Oral leukoplakia , oral leukoplakia (diagnosis) , oral leukoplakia , Leukoplakia (...) Oral Leukoplakia Oral Leukoplakia Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Oral Leukoplakia Oral Leukoplakia Aka: Oral

2018 FP Notebook

7. Hairy Leukoplakia (Treatment)

Treatment & Management Updated: Dec 19, 2018 Author: James E Cade, DDS; Chief Editor: Jeff Burgess, DDS, MSD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Hairy Leukoplakia Treatment Medical Care As a benign lesion with low morbidity, oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) does not require specific treatment in every case. Indications for treatment include symptoms attributable to the lesion, or a patient's desire to eliminate the lesion for cosmetic reasons. The variable natural history of the lesion (...) and its tendency toward spontaneous resolution should be considered in any management decision. Several treatment options are available. With highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) therapy, oral hairy leukoplakia usually decreases, but can return when HAART is decreased. Direct treatment of oral hairy leukoplakia with antivirals usually is not necessary. [ , ] Systemic antiviral therapy usually achieves resolution of the lesion within 1-2 weeks of therapy. [ ] Oral therapy with acyclovir

2014 eMedicine.com

8. Hairy Leukoplakia (Overview)

: James E Cade, DDS; Chief Editor: Jeff Burgess, DDS, MSD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Hairy Leukoplakia Overview Background Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is a disease of the mucosa first described in 1984. This pathology is associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and occurs mostly in people with HIV infection, including those who do not have a diagnosis of AIDS. HIV-negative people can have oral hairy leukoplakia, especially individuals with organ transplants and other (...) -infected B cells. In addition, a marked decrease or an absence of Langerhans cells occurs in hairy leukoplakia biopsy tissues. [ , ] Langerhans cells are the antigen-presenting immune cells that are required for an immune system response to the viral infection and their deficiency may permit EBV to persistently replicate and escape immune recognition. Previous Next: Etiology Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is associated with HIV infection and/or immunosuppression. [ ] The risk of developing oral hairy

2014 eMedicine.com

9. Hairy Leukoplakia (Follow-up)

Treatment & Management Updated: Dec 19, 2018 Author: James E Cade, DDS; Chief Editor: Jeff Burgess, DDS, MSD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Hairy Leukoplakia Treatment Medical Care As a benign lesion with low morbidity, oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) does not require specific treatment in every case. Indications for treatment include symptoms attributable to the lesion, or a patient's desire to eliminate the lesion for cosmetic reasons. The variable natural history of the lesion (...) and its tendency toward spontaneous resolution should be considered in any management decision. Several treatment options are available. With highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) therapy, oral hairy leukoplakia usually decreases, but can return when HAART is decreased. Direct treatment of oral hairy leukoplakia with antivirals usually is not necessary. [ , ] Systemic antiviral therapy usually achieves resolution of the lesion within 1-2 weeks of therapy. [ ] Oral therapy with acyclovir

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Hairy Leukoplakia (Diagnosis)

Author: James E Cade, DDS; Chief Editor: Jeff Burgess, DDS, MSD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Hairy Leukoplakia Overview Background Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is a disease of the mucosa first described in 1984. This pathology is associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and occurs mostly in people with HIV infection, including those who do not have a diagnosis of AIDS. HIV-negative people can have oral hairy leukoplakia, especially individuals with organ transplants and other (...) -infected B cells. In addition, a marked decrease or an absence of Langerhans cells occurs in hairy leukoplakia biopsy tissues. [ , ] Langerhans cells are the antigen-presenting immune cells that are required for an immune system response to the viral infection and their deficiency may permit EBV to persistently replicate and escape immune recognition. Previous Next: Etiology Oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) is associated with HIV infection and/or immunosuppression. [ ] The risk of developing oral hairy

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Oral Hairy Leukoplakia

Oral Hairy Leukoplakia Oral Hairy Leukoplakia Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Oral Hairy Leukoplakia Oral Hairy (...) Leukoplakia Aka: Oral Hairy Leukoplakia , Hairy Leukoplakia From Related Chapters II. Causes ( ) (including HIV) III. Signs Vertical white striations on appear similar to hairs Distributed over lateral dorsum of (unilateral or bilateral) IV. Labs: Indicated if no obvious Immunodeficiency V. Management May respond to antiviral agents (may also recur after course completed) 800 mg 5 times daily for 1-3 weeks Ganciclovir 100 mg 3 times daily for 1-3 weeks VI. References Images: Related links to external

2015 FP Notebook

12. Oral hairy leukoplakia: a clinical indicator of immunosuppression (PubMed)

Oral hairy leukoplakia: a clinical indicator of immunosuppression 21398239 2011 07 22 2018 11 13 1488-2329 183 8 2011 May 17 CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l'Association medicale canadienne CMAJ Oral hairy leukoplakia: a clinical indicator of immunosuppression. 932 10.1503/cmaj.100841 Kreuter Alexander A Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany. a.kreuter@derma.de Wieland Ulrike U eng Case Reports Journal Article 2011 03 (...) 07 Canada CMAJ 9711805 0820-3946 AIM IM Adult HIV Infections complications pathology Humans Immunocompromised Host Leukoplakia, Hairy etiology pathology Male 2011 3 15 6 0 2011 3 15 6 0 2011 7 23 6 0 ppublish 21398239 cmaj.100841 10.1503/cmaj.100841 PMC3091903 MMWR Recomm Rep. 1992 Dec 18;41(RR-17):1-19 1361652 Int J Surg Pathol. 2010 Jun;18(3):177-83 19033322 Curr HIV/AIDS Rep. 2008 Feb;5(1):5-12 18417029 Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2006 Jan;11(1):E33-9 16388291

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2011 CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association Journal

13. Leukoplakia, Oral (Diagnosis)

inherited or genetically driven forms of oral white lesions, which include white sponge nevus, among others. [ ] Oral white lesions include leukoplakias (as defined above), keratoses, leukoplakias of clear infective origin (candidal, syphilitic, hairy leukoplakia associated with Epstein-Barr virus), candidosis, lichen planus, oral submucous fibrosis, lupus erythematosus, congenital lesions (eg, white sponge nevus, dyskeratosis congenita, pachyonychia congenita), and frank carcinomas. Next (...) Leukoplakia, Oral (Diagnosis) Dermatologic Manifestations of Oral Leukoplakia: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA3NTQ0OC1vdmVydmlldw== processing

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Leukoplakia, Oral (Overview)

inherited or genetically driven forms of oral white lesions, which include white sponge nevus, among others. [ ] Oral white lesions include leukoplakias (as defined above), keratoses, leukoplakias of clear infective origin (candidal, syphilitic, hairy leukoplakia associated with Epstein-Barr virus), candidosis, lichen planus, oral submucous fibrosis, lupus erythematosus, congenital lesions (eg, white sponge nevus, dyskeratosis congenita, pachyonychia congenita), and frank carcinomas. Next (...) Leukoplakia, Oral (Overview) Dermatologic Manifestations of Oral Leukoplakia: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvMTA3NTQ0OC1vdmVydmlldw== processing

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Oral Leukoplakia

of Epstein-Barr virus is present, the condition is called hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY). Definition (CSP) white patch seen on the oral mucosa; considered a premalignant condition and is often tobacco-induced. Concepts Neoplastic Process ( T191 ) MSH ICD10 SnomedCT 196564008 , 62953009 , 155663006 , 196570002 , 414603003 English Leukoplakias, Oral , Oral Leukoplakias , LEUKOPLAKIA ORAL , Oral mucosa leukoplakia NOS , Oral leukoplakia , oral leukoplakia (diagnosis) , oral leukoplakia , Leukoplakia (...) Oral Leukoplakia Oral Leukoplakia Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Oral Leukoplakia Oral Leukoplakia Aka: Oral

2015 FP Notebook

16. HIV Status Does Not Worsen Oral Health Outcomes. (PubMed)

and selected all HIV-positive subjects (N=73) and matched them by age, sex, ethnicity, and smoking habits with 261 HIV-negative control subjects. Based on these 334 total individuals, several dental conditions, including the need for root canal treatment, gingivitis, periodontitis, hairy leukoplakia, and dental caries were compared between the two groups. Overall there was no difference in dental disease between the HIV-positive and -negative groups. In our data, it was found that the prevalence (...) HIV Status Does Not Worsen Oral Health Outcomes. Last January 31st , Journal of Clinical Periodontology just made available the report titled "A Retrospective Analysis of Dental Implant Survival in HIV Patients", which concluded that "implants placed in HIV-positive patients had similar survival rates as HIV-negative patients." These data support our hypothesis that infection by HIV does not lead to worse oral health outcomes, including worse periodontitis. We looked 6,092 individuals

2019 Journal of Clinical Periodontology

17. Hairy Tongue (Treatment)

):10845-50. . Kaplan I, Moskona D. A clinical survey of oral soft tissue lesions in institutionalized geriatric patients in Israel. Gerodontology . 1990 Summer. 9(2):59-62. . Erriu M, Pili FM, Denotti G, Garau V. Black hairy tongue in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. J Int Soc Prev Community Dent . 2016 Jan-Feb. 6 (1):80-3. . Winzer M, Gilliar U. [Hairy tongue and hairy oral leukoplakia--a differential histopathologic diagnosis]. Z Hautkr . 1988 Jun 15. 63(6):517-20. . Winzer M, Gilliar U (...) , Ackerman AB. Hairy lesions of the oral cavity. Clinical and histopathologic differentiation of hairy leukoplakia from hairy tongue. Am J Dermatopathol . 1988 Apr. 10(2):155-9. . Lambertini M, Patrizi A, Ravaioli GM, Dika E. Oral pigmentations in physiologic conditions, post inflammatory affections and systemic diseases. G Ital Dermatol Venereol . 2017 Apr 19. . Rushing EC, Hoschar AP, McDonnell JK, Billings SD. Iatrogenic oral hairy leukoplakia: report of two cases. J Cutan Pathol . 2011 Mar. 38(3):275

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Hairy Tongue (Overview)

. Gerodontology . 1990 Summer. 9(2):59-62. . Erriu M, Pili FM, Denotti G, Garau V. Black hairy tongue in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. J Int Soc Prev Community Dent . 2016 Jan-Feb. 6 (1):80-3. . Winzer M, Gilliar U. [Hairy tongue and hairy oral leukoplakia--a differential histopathologic diagnosis]. Z Hautkr . 1988 Jun 15. 63(6):517-20. . Winzer M, Gilliar U, Ackerman AB. Hairy lesions of the oral cavity. Clinical and histopathologic differentiation of hairy leukoplakia from hairy tongue. Am J (...) Dermatopathol . 1988 Apr. 10(2):155-9. . Lambertini M, Patrizi A, Ravaioli GM, Dika E. Oral pigmentations in physiologic conditions, post inflammatory affections and systemic diseases. G Ital Dermatol Venereol . 2017 Apr 19. . Rushing EC, Hoschar AP, McDonnell JK, Billings SD. Iatrogenic oral hairy leukoplakia: report of two cases. J Cutan Pathol . 2011 Mar. 38(3):275-9. . Gurvits GE, Tan A. Black hairy tongue syndrome. World J Gastroenterol . 2014 Aug 21. 20 (31):10845-50. . Cheshire WP Jr. Unilateral

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Hairy Tongue (Follow-up)

):10845-50. . Kaplan I, Moskona D. A clinical survey of oral soft tissue lesions in institutionalized geriatric patients in Israel. Gerodontology . 1990 Summer. 9(2):59-62. . Erriu M, Pili FM, Denotti G, Garau V. Black hairy tongue in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. J Int Soc Prev Community Dent . 2016 Jan-Feb. 6 (1):80-3. . Winzer M, Gilliar U. [Hairy tongue and hairy oral leukoplakia--a differential histopathologic diagnosis]. Z Hautkr . 1988 Jun 15. 63(6):517-20. . Winzer M, Gilliar U (...) , Ackerman AB. Hairy lesions of the oral cavity. Clinical and histopathologic differentiation of hairy leukoplakia from hairy tongue. Am J Dermatopathol . 1988 Apr. 10(2):155-9. . Lambertini M, Patrizi A, Ravaioli GM, Dika E. Oral pigmentations in physiologic conditions, post inflammatory affections and systemic diseases. G Ital Dermatol Venereol . 2017 Apr 19. . Rushing EC, Hoschar AP, McDonnell JK, Billings SD. Iatrogenic oral hairy leukoplakia: report of two cases. J Cutan Pathol . 2011 Mar. 38(3):275

2014 eMedicine.com

20. Hairy Tongue (Diagnosis)

. Gerodontology . 1990 Summer. 9(2):59-62. . Erriu M, Pili FM, Denotti G, Garau V. Black hairy tongue in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. J Int Soc Prev Community Dent . 2016 Jan-Feb. 6 (1):80-3. . Winzer M, Gilliar U. [Hairy tongue and hairy oral leukoplakia--a differential histopathologic diagnosis]. Z Hautkr . 1988 Jun 15. 63(6):517-20. . Winzer M, Gilliar U, Ackerman AB. Hairy lesions of the oral cavity. Clinical and histopathologic differentiation of hairy leukoplakia from hairy tongue. Am J (...) Dermatopathol . 1988 Apr. 10(2):155-9. . Lambertini M, Patrizi A, Ravaioli GM, Dika E. Oral pigmentations in physiologic conditions, post inflammatory affections and systemic diseases. G Ital Dermatol Venereol . 2017 Apr 19. . Rushing EC, Hoschar AP, McDonnell JK, Billings SD. Iatrogenic oral hairy leukoplakia: report of two cases. J Cutan Pathol . 2011 Mar. 38(3):275-9. . Gurvits GE, Tan A. Black hairy tongue syndrome. World J Gastroenterol . 2014 Aug 21. 20 (31):10845-50. . Cheshire WP Jr. Unilateral

2014 eMedicine.com

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