How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

139 results for

Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer

Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer (...) Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer Aka: Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer , Cromolyn Sodium Ophthalmic , Crolom , Olopatadine , Patanol , Lodoxamide , Alomide , Ketotifen Ophthalmic , Alaway OTC , Zaditor II. Indications III. Preparations Cromolyn (Crolom) 1 drop 4-6x/day Olopatadine 0.1% (Patanol) 1-2 drops each eye twice daily Lodoxamide 0.1% (Alomide) 1-2 drops each eye four times daily Ketotifen 0.025% (Alaway OTC, Zaditor) 1-2 drops each eye twice daily Less expensive and over-the-counter Images: Related

2018 FP Notebook

2. Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer

Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer (...) Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer Aka: Ocular Mast Cell Stabilizer , Cromolyn Sodium Ophthalmic , Crolom , Olopatadine , Patanol , Lodoxamide , Alomide , Ketotifen Ophthalmic , Alaway OTC , Zaditor II. Indications III. Preparations Cromolyn (Crolom) 1 drop 4-6x/day Olopatadine 0.1% (Patanol) 1-2 drops each eye twice daily Lodoxamide 0.1% (Alomide) 1-2 drops each eye four times daily Ketotifen 0.025% (Alaway OTC, Zaditor) 1-2 drops each eye twice daily Less expensive and over-the-counter Images: Related

2015 FP Notebook

3. Projected 24-hour post-dose ocular itching scores post-treatment with olopatadine 0.7% versus 0.2% (PubMed)

Projected 24-hour post-dose ocular itching scores post-treatment with olopatadine 0.7% versus 0.2% Olopatadine is an antihistamine and mast cell stabilizer used for treating allergic conjunctivitis. Olopatadine 0.7% has been recently approved for daily dosing in the US, which supersedes the previously approved 0.2% strength. The objective of this analysis was to characterize patients who have better itching relief at 24 h when taking olopatadine 0.7% treatment instead of olopatadine 0.2 (...) % (in terms of proportions of responses) and relate this to the severity of baseline itching as an indirect metric of a patient's sensitivity to antihistamines. A differential odds model was developed using data from two conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC) studies to characterize individual-level and population-level response to ocular itching following olopatadine treatment and the data was analyzed retrospectively. This modeling analysis was designed to predict 24 h ocular itching scores

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Journal of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

4. Neuronal Fc-epsilon receptor I contributes to antigen-evoked pruritus in a murine model of ocular allergy. (PubMed)

-induced scratching was largely abolished by topical application of the blocking antibody to FcεRIα, but was only partially alleviated by pretreatment of mast cell stabilizer or histamine I receptor antagonist. The expression of FcεRI was detected in subpopulations of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons including those expressing pruriceptive markers and innervating the conjunctiva in the naïve mice. Moreover, FcεRI was found significantly upregulated in small-sized TG neurons in the OVA+alum sensitized (...) Neuronal Fc-epsilon receptor I contributes to antigen-evoked pruritus in a murine model of ocular allergy. Pruritus is the major symptom of ocular allergy but currently available treatments are often ineffective. Previous studies demonstrated that subpopulations of primary sensory neurons express Fc receptors and may contribute to antigen-specific pain. We investigated the role of neuronal Fc-epsilon Receptor I (FcεRI) in allergic ocular pruritus. Ovalbumin (OVA) was used as allergen together

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Brain, behavior, and immunity

5. Ocular Allergy Preparations

Ocular Allergy Preparations Aka: Ocular Allergy Preparations From Related Chapters II. Preparations: NSAIDs ( ) 1 drop qid III. Preparations: Antihistamine-Decongestant Contraindications Avoid in Preparations: and Pheniramine maleate Brand Names: Opcon-A, -A Dose: 1-2 drops q4h up to qid IV. Preparations: Mast Cell Stabilizer Cromolyn ( ) 1 drop 4-6 times per day Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Ocular Allergy (...) Ocular Allergy Preparations Ocular Allergy Preparations Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ocular Allergy Preparations

2018 FP Notebook

6. Ocular itch associated with allergic conjunctivitis: latest evidence and clinical management (PubMed)

contributing to the propagation of the response by calling in other immune cells and further inflammation. This article presents the evolution of ocular allergy treatments, from vasoconstrictors, to antihistamines and mast-cell stabilizers, to the dual-acting agents, as well as corticosteroid and immunomodulatory options. Future targets for allergy treatment are also discussed. (...) Ocular itch associated with allergic conjunctivitis: latest evidence and clinical management Allergic conjunctivitis is one of the most common allergic conditions worldwide. Its incidence is increasing due to changing climate, pollution, increased pollen loads, and the subject's heightened immunological sensitivity in response to these environmental changes. The pathophysiology predominantly involves immunoglobulin E-related mast-cell activation, with release of histamine and other mediators

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 Therapeutic advances in chronic disease

7. Ocular Allergy Preparations

Ocular Allergy Preparations Aka: Ocular Allergy Preparations From Related Chapters II. Preparations: NSAIDs ( ) 1 drop qid III. Preparations: Antihistamine-Decongestant Contraindications Avoid in Preparations: and Pheniramine maleate Brand Names: Opcon-A, -A Dose: 1-2 drops q4h up to qid IV. Preparations: Mast Cell Stabilizer Cromolyn ( ) 1 drop 4-6 times per day Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Ocular Allergy (...) Ocular Allergy Preparations Ocular Allergy Preparations Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Ocular Allergy Preparations

2015 FP Notebook

8. Integrated phase III trials of bepotastine besilate ophthalmic solution 1.5% for ocular itching associated with allergic conjunctivitis. (PubMed)

Integrated phase III trials of bepotastine besilate ophthalmic solution 1.5% for ocular itching associated with allergic conjunctivitis. Allergic conjunctivitis is a clinical reaction to environmental allergens and is manifested by ocular itching caused by IgE-induced mast cell degranulation. Bepotastine besilate is a selective H(1)-antagonist with mast cell stabilizing properties. This report examines the reduction of ocular itching integrated from two conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC (...) ) clinical trials comparing bepotastine besilate ophthalmic solution (BBOS) 1.5% to placebo in subjects with a history of allergic conjunctivitis. Two phase III, double-masked, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, CAC clinical trials evaluated BBOS 1.5% versus placebo to reduce ocular itching. Eligible subjects were randomly assigned 1:1 to either BBOS 1.5% (n = 78) or placebo (n = 79). Ocular itching was graded by subjects using a standardized scale (0–4 U). Adverse events and ophthalmic clinical

2012 Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

9. Efficacy of intranasal corticosteroids for the ocular symptoms of allergic rhinitis: A systematic review. (PubMed)

Efficacy of intranasal corticosteroids for the ocular symptoms of allergic rhinitis: A systematic review. Current treatment options for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis include topical antihistamines, vasoconstrictors, mast cell stabilizers, intranasal corticosteroids (INCS), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that are generally used as a supplement to oral or intranasal therapies, necessitating the use of multiple treatments for the different symptoms of allergic rhinitis (AR). To assess (...) the efficacy of INCS for ocular symptoms (OS) of AR. A search was performed of clinical trials (n = 32) from 1973 to 2009 of English articles (Medline, Embase, and PubMed) using "intranasal corticosteroid," "allergic rhinitis," "ocular symptoms," "allergic conjunctivitis," and "rhinoconjunctivitis" as key words. Quality assessment for the 32 eligible studies was performed using the Jadad score. Statistical analysis for continuous data was done by weighted mean difference or standardized mean difference

2011 Allergy and Asthma Proceedings

10. Updates in the treatment of ocular allergies (PubMed)

. In relapses, corticosteroids are needed. When the use of corticosteroids is continuous, CsA drops should be used, and in relapses, corticosteroids should be used additionally. Nonallergic eosinophilic conjunctivitis (NAEC) is a less known, but rather common, ocular disease. It affects mostly middle-aged and older women. The eye symptoms of NAEC are largely similar to those seen in chronic allergic conjunctivitis. Basic therapy is mast cell-stabilizing drops. Eosinophilic inflammation needs additional (...) is helpful. PAC needs longer therapy, often year round, with mast cell stabilizers, antihistamines, and sometimes local steroids. Atopic keratoconjunctivitis is a more severe disease showing chronic blepharitis often connected with severe keratitis. It needs, in many cases, continuous treatment of the lid eczema and keratoconjunctivitis. Blepharitis is treated with tacrolimus or pimecrolimus ointment. Conjunctivitis additionally needs corticosteroids and, if needed, cyclosporine A (CsA) drops

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2010 Journal of asthma and allergy

11. Mapracorat Ophthalmic Suspension for the Treatment of Ocular Inflammation Following Cataract Surgery

, uncomplicated cataract surgery Participants who, in the Investigator's opinion, have potential postoperative pinhole Snellen visual acuity (VA) of at least 20/200 in the study eye. Participants must be willing to wait to undergo cataract surgery on the fellow eye until after the study has been completed. Exclusion Criteria: Participants who are expected to require concurrent ocular therapy (either eye) with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), mast cell stabilizers, antihistamines (...) Mapracorat Ophthalmic Suspension for the Treatment of Ocular Inflammation Following Cataract Surgery Mapracorat Ophthalmic Suspension for the Treatment of Ocular Inflammation Following Cataract Surgery - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please

2010 Clinical Trials

12. Vernal Keratoconjunctivitis (Spring catarrh)

Milder cases (without active limbal or corneal involvement): B1: possible prescription of drugs; routine referral Initial management followed by routine referral if mast cell stabilizers fail to provide symptomatic relief. Consider co-management with ophthalmologist. VKC requires careful monitoring for sight-threatening complications Possible management by ophthalmologist Usually topical steroid. Other topical drugs used include immunosuppressants (e.g. ciclosporin) and mucolytics (acetyl cysteine (...) of children (prevalence in Western Europe is 3.2 per 100,000 inhabitants) More common in some other parts of the world, e.g. Mediterranean region, parts of Africa, Indian sub-continent Complex immune reaction with raised IgE levels in the tears and serum, and mast cells and eosinophils in the conjunctival epithelium Predisposing factors Onset usually before 10 years of age; M:F = 3-4:1 Seasonal exacerbations (hence name) but condition may be active year-round if severe Patients usually atopic

2018 College of Optometrists

13. CL-associated Papillary Conjunctivitis (CLAPC), Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC)

thickness soft lens: change material to one with improved deposit resistance, and/or lower modulus, and/or change edge profile change to daily disposable soft lenses Ocular prostheses polish, adjust or replace prosthesis (GRADE*: Level of evidence=low; Strength of recommendation=strong) Pharmacological Topical mast cell stabilisers (gutt. 2%, gutt. 0.1%, gutt. 2%): can be used while lens wear continues but preserved drops should not be instilled with soft lenses in situ nedocromil sodium is yellow (...) and may discolour soft lenses (GRADE*: Level of evidence=low; Strength of recommendation=strong) Topical combined anti-histamine/mast cell stabilizer e.g. gutt. 0.1% (off-licence use) (GRADE*: Level of evidence=low; Strength of recommendation=strong) In cases that do not respond to other treatment, consider a six-week treatment period of a ‘non-penetrating’ topical steroid such as gutt. 0.5% qds (off-licence use). Monitor IOP at beginning, at two weeks, and at end of treatment period (see Clinical

2018 College of Optometrists

14. Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis (Hay Fever Conjunctivitis); Perennial Allergic Conjunctivitis

avoidance of allergen(s) Cool compresses for symptomatic relief Advise against eye rubbing (causes mechanical mast cell degranulation) (GRADE*: Level of evidence=low, Strength of recommendation=strong) Pharmacological Ocular lubricants for symptomatic relief (GRADE*: Level of evidence=low, Strength of recommendation=strong) Various topical treatment options are available but there is insufficient evidence to recommend the use of one type of medication over another; however the choice of drug may (...) be determined by: compliance, cost, contact lens wear, and availability of preservative-free formulation (if required): topical mast cell stabilizers, e.g. , or topical antihistamine e.g. , or topical antihistamine + mast cell inhibitor, e.g. or topical NSAID e.g. Systemic antihistamine (e.g. tabs or once daily) effective also for other symptoms of hay fever, e.g. allergic rhinitis (GRADE*: Level of evidence=high, Strength of recommendation=strong) Management category B2: alleviation or palliation; normally

2018 College of Optometrists

15. Conjunctivitis medicamentosa

prescriber, consider a short course of topical steroid (GRADE*: Level of evidence=low, Strength of recommendation=weak) Antihistamines and mast cell stabilizers are not recommended for the treatment of conjunctivitis medicamentosa because they are ineffective in controlling inflammation in type IV hypersensitivity reactions Management category B2: alleviation or palliation; normally no referral, but always inform and be advised by the original prescriber Possible management by ophthalmologist As above (...) Chemical irritation of ocular and/or adnexal tissues by a topically applied drug/preservative or cosmetic, or by environmental or occupational substances or Delayed hypersensitivity (cell-mediated) response to a topically applied drug/preservative or cosmetic Some drugs/preservatives may be both toxic and capable of inducing a delayed hypersensitivity response Whatever the mechanism, there may be a delay in onset of weeks or months following a symptom-free period Predisposing factors Topical ophthalmic

2018 College of Optometrists

16. Improving Quality of Life: Substance Use and Aging

to emphasize psychosocial factors as central to aging successfully. Reichstadt and colleagues (2007) conducted focus group interviews with 72 older adults between the ages of 60 and 99. Participants identified 33 factors relevant to successful aging, which could be grouped into four broad categories: 1. The importance of one’s attitude and ability to adapt to change; 2. A sense of security and stability in life, often related to issues involving one’s living environment, social supports and financial

2018 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

17. CRACKCast E119 – Allergy, Hypersensitivity, Angioedema, and Anaphylaxis

● (+) chronotropy Beta-2 ● Mast cell/basophil stabilization ● Bronchodilation These combined effects result in decreased mediator release from mast cells and basophils, which improves hives and bronchospasm, decreases mucosal edema and swelling, and reverses systemic hypotension. Epinephrine therefore works directly to improve the clinical features most commonly observed in an anaphylactic reaction. [3] List 5 IgE-mediated anaphylactic reactions + 5 non-IgE mediated reactions Refer to box 109.3 in Rosen’s 9 th (...) in this chapter to refer to mast cell–mediated hypersensitivity reactions. For most allergic diseases to occur, predisposed individuals need to be exposed to allergens through a process called sensitization. Substances that elicit an allergic reaction are referred to as allergens, and those that elicit an antibody response (activated by B- and T-cell receptors) are called antigens. Urticaria A common allergic reaction to foods, drugs, or physical stimuli and is clinically characterized by an erythematous

2017 CandiEM

19. British Association of Dermatologists and British Photodermatology Group guidelines for the safe and effective use of psoralen ultraviolet A (PUVA) therapy

) in adults has been studied in children over the age of 12 years. 41 This small study of 30 participants reported patient evaluations with an overall patient satisfaction score of 88 on a scale of 0–10. The most convincing evidence for the use of PUVA in chil- dren with atopic eczema came from a report by Sheehan et al., who found that 32 of 39 children were able to achieve remis- sion. 42 Similar results have been reported for the use of UVB in children with atopic eczema. 43 9.3 Cutaneous T-cell (...) lymphoma PUVA remains a major therapeutic modality in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Its use is in the treat- ment of the most common form of CTCL, MF, where it remains the major therapy for plaque-stage disease. PUVA phototoxicity has been shown to target selectively neoplastic T lymphocytes in the skin. 44–48 9.3.1 How does psoralen–ultraviolet A therapy compare with other types of phototherapy in cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma? Narrowband ultraviolet B (TL-01) compared with psoralen

2016 British Association of Dermatologists

20. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Sustained Neuromuscular Blockade in the Adult Critically Ill Patient

on mast cells rather than via IgE-mediated anaphylaxis ( , ), can be attenuated by slow injection over 1–3 minutes or by pretreatment with histamine H 1 - and H 2 -receptor antagonists ( , ). | Vagolytic Actions. Vagolytic actions are most prominent with pancuronium ( , ) and result in mild and dose-dependent tachycardia ( ). Most clinicians avoid pancuronium in patients with coronary artery disease because of the risk of tachycardia-induced myocardial ischemia ( ), ventricular ectopy (...) . Hypersensitivity and resistance to NMBAs are observed in a number of clinical states. Changes in sensitivity to NMBAs may be due to either 1) an increase in the number or sensitivity of receptors (up-regulation) or 2) a decrease in the number or sensitivity of the receptors (down-regulation) ( ). Up-regulation increases the sensitivity to acetylcholine and decreases sensitivity to NMBAs. Up-regulation can lead to release of K + from cells after succinylcholine administration in patients with motor neuron

2016 Society of Critical Care Medicine

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>