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Obesity Risk

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1. Obesity and cardiovascular risk: a call for action from the European Society of Hypertension Working Group of Obesity, Diabetes and the High-risk Patient and European Association for the Study of Obesity: part B: obesity-induced cardiovascular disease, ea (PubMed)

Obesity and cardiovascular risk: a call for action from the European Society of Hypertension Working Group of Obesity, Diabetes and the High-risk Patient and European Association for the Study of Obesity: part B: obesity-induced cardiovascular disease, ea : Obesity predisposes for atrial fibrillation, heart failure, sudden cardiac death, renal disease and ischemic stroke, which are the main causes of cardiovascular hospitalization and mortality. As obesity and the cardiovascular effects (...) on the vessels and the heart start early in life, even from childhood, it is important for health policies to prevent obesity very early before the disease manifestation emerge. Key roles in the prevention are strategies to increase physical exercise, reduce body weight and to prevent or treat hypertension, lipids disorders and diabetes earlier and efficiently to prevent cardiovascular complications.

2018 Journal of Hypertension

2. Obesity and cardiovascular risk: a call for action from the European Society of Hypertension Working Group of Obesity, Diabetes and the High-risk Patient and European Association for the Study of Obesity: part A: mechanisms of obesity induced hypertension (PubMed)

Obesity and cardiovascular risk: a call for action from the European Society of Hypertension Working Group of Obesity, Diabetes and the High-risk Patient and European Association for the Study of Obesity: part A: mechanisms of obesity induced hypertension : Obesity is a key factor for cardiovascular diseases and complications. Obesity is associated with hypertension, dyslipidemia and type II diabetes, which are the major predictors of cardiovascular disease in the future. It predisposes (...) for atrial fibrillation, heart failure, sudden cardiac death, renal disease and ischemic stroke that are the main causes of cardiovascular hospitalization and mortality. As obesity and the cardiovascular effects on the vessels and the heart start early in life, even from childhood, it is important for health policies to prevent obesity very early before the disease manifestation emerge. Key roles in the prevention are strategies to increase physical exercise, reduce body weight and to prevent or treat

2018 Journal of Hypertension

3. Does breastfeeding affect the risk of childhood obesity?

Does breastfeeding affect the risk of childhood obesity? Does breastfeeding affect the risk of childhood obesity? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics Does breastfeeding affect the risk of childhood obesity? View/ Open Date 2016-12 Format Metadata Abstract Q: Does breastfeeding affect the risk of childhood (...) obesity? Evidence-based answer: Yes. Even having breastfed during the first year of life is associated with a 15% lower risk of overweight or obesity over the next 2 to 14 years compared with never having breastfed. Breastfeeding exclusively for 6 months is associated with a 30% to 50% reduction in risk (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, meta-analysis of cohort studies and subsequent cohort studies). However, interventions that increase breastfeeding rates during the first 3 to 6 months of life

2017 Clinical Inquiries

4. Cohort study: Consuming meals prepared at home more frequently appears to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, weight gain and obesity

Cohort study: Consuming meals prepared at home more frequently appears to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, weight gain and obesity Consuming meals prepared at home more frequently appears to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, weight gain and obesity | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log (...) in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Consuming meals prepared at home more frequently appears to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, weight gain and obesity Article Text

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

5. Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors

Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors Discover Portal Discover Portal Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors Published on 7 November 2017 doi: People with certain metabolic risk factors who are obese are two and a half times as likely to develop heart disease as healthy people (...) of normal weight. But those who are obese without these other risk factors still have a 28% increased risk of heart disease compared with healthy people of normal weight. This suggests excess weight should be seen as an independent risk factor, challenging the idea that people can be “fat but fit”. Metabolic risk factors for heart disease cluster together and in this large study the researchers defined “metabolically healthy” as not having; high blood pressure, raised blood sugar, high triglyceride

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

6. Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children

Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children Discover Portal Discover Portal Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children Published on 13 February 2018 doi: Children who eat takeaways once or more each week have more body fat and higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) “bad” cholesterol levels than those who never or hardly ever eat them (...) . Their diets were also higher in fat and lower in protein and calcium. This cross-sectional study looked in depth at eating habits and risk markers for coronary heart disease, obesity and diabetes in 2,529 children in England. Though this type of study can only show an association between takeaways and risk markers, it is one of the first of its type, and the results do give cause for concern. Increasing numbers of people are eating takeaways in the UK. Local authorities and healthcare professionals

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

7. Obesity and Mortality Risk in Critically Ill Children

Obesity and Mortality Risk in Critically Ill Children PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2016 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

8. The Effect of a Multidisciplinary Lifestyle Intervention on Obesity Status, Body Composition, Physical Fitness, and Cardiometabolic Risk Markers in Children and Adolescents with Obesity. (PubMed)

The Effect of a Multidisciplinary Lifestyle Intervention on Obesity Status, Body Composition, Physical Fitness, and Cardiometabolic Risk Markers in Children and Adolescents with Obesity. This study aimed to develop a multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention program targeted at children and adolescents with moderate to severe obesity, and assess the additional effects of exercise intervention when compared to usual care. Overall, the 103 enrolled participants were ≥85th percentile of age and sex (...) interaction effects were observed in percentage body fat (%BF) (β = -1.52, 95%CI = -2.58⁻-0.45), lean body mass (LM) (β = 1.20, 95%CI = 0.12⁻2.29), diastolic blood pressure (β = -5.24, 95%CI = -9.66⁻-0.83), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (β = -1.67, 95%CI = -2.77⁻-1.01), and wall sit test score (β = 50.74, 95%CI = 32.30⁻69.18). We developed a moderate-intensity intervention program that can be sustained in the real-world setting and is practically applicable to both moderate and severe obesity. After

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2019 Nutrients

9. The Risk of Post-operative Complications in Super-Super Obesity Compared to Super Obesity in Accredited Bariatric Surgery Centers. (PubMed)

The Risk of Post-operative Complications in Super-Super Obesity Compared to Super Obesity in Accredited Bariatric Surgery Centers. The prevalence of super obesity (SO, BMI > 50.0 kg/m2) and super-super obesity (SSO, BMI > 60 kg/m2) is increasing. Current data are limited and discrepant on the relationship between SSO and post-bariatric surgery complication risk. We hypothesized there would be increased complications for both laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (...) (LSG) in SSO compared to SO, but the relative risk (RR) would support the use of LSG in SSO patients.Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement 2016 data were queried for SO and SSO patients undergoing LRYGB or LSG. Thirty-day post-operative complications were calculated. Univariate analyses were performed with a χ2 or Student's t test. Comparisons between multiple groups were performed using a one-way ANOVA. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05.A total

2019 Obesity Surgery

10. Obesity, abdominal obesity and subsequent risk of kidney cancer: a cohort study of 23.3 million East Asians. (PubMed)

Obesity, abdominal obesity and subsequent risk of kidney cancer: a cohort study of 23.3 million East Asians. Limited evidence exists regarding associations between obesity and kidney cancer among Asians. We examined the associations between obesity measures and risk of kidney cancer.We included 23,313,046 adults who underwent health examinations provided by the Korean National Health Insurance Service 2009-2012 and performed multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses.During 5.4 (...) years of follow-up, 18,036 cases of kidney cancer were recorded, and cumulative incidence was 0.12%. General and abdominal obesity were associated with 1.32-fold increased risk of kidney cancer compared with groups without either obesity status. Underweight individuals showed decreased adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for kidney cancer (0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.68-0.85) compared to those with normal body mass index (BMI), while the HRs increased among individuals with BMI 23-24.9 kg/m2 (1.23, 1.18

2019 British Journal of Cancer

11. Cohort study: Overweight or obese young people are not at increased risk of depression, but young people with depression are at increased risk of obesity

Cohort study: Overweight or obese young people are not at increased risk of depression, but young people with depression are at increased risk of obesity Overweight or obese young people are not at increased risk of depression, but young people with depression are at increased risk of obesity | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we (...) use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Overweight or obese young people are not at increased risk of depression, but young people

2014 Evidence-Based Nursing

12. The Effect of Liquid Meal Replacements on Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Overweight/Obese Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

The Effect of Liquid Meal Replacements on Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Overweight/Obese Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials The evidence for liquid meal replacements in diabetes has not been summarized. Our objective was to synthesize the evidence of the effect of liquid meal replacements on cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight/obese individuals with type 2 diabetes.Data sources included MEDLINE, EMBASE (...) , and the Cochrane Library through 10 December 2018. We included randomized trials of ≥2 weeks assessing the effect of liquid meal replacements in weight loss diets compared with traditional weight loss diets on cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight/obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data and assessed risk of bias. Data were pooled using the inverse variance method. The overall certainty of the evidence was evaluated using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations

2019 EvidenceUpdates

13. Efficacy of Fish Oil and/or Probiotic Intervention on the Incidence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in an At-Risk Group of Overweight and Obese Women: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

Efficacy of Fish Oil and/or Probiotic Intervention on the Incidence of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in an At-Risk Group of Overweight and Obese Women: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial To assess whether the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) may be lowered and glucose metabolism improved by daily administration of fish oil and/or probiotic supplements in overweight and obese pregnant women.We randomized in a double-blind manner 439 women (mean 13.9 ± 2.1 (...) ; fish oil + placebo, 23 of 96, 24.0%; probiotics + placebo, 25 of 99, 25.3%; fish oil + probiotics, 26 of 91, 28.6%; and placebo + placebo, 20 of 91, 22.0%) and the change in glucose, insulin, or HOMA2-IR (n = 364) did not differ among the intervention groups (P > 0.11 for all comparisons).An intervention with fish oil and/or probiotics during pregnancy seemed to be both safe and well tolerated but conferred no benefits in lowering the risk of GDM or improving glucose metabolism in overweight

2019 EvidenceUpdates

14. The Cardiometabolic Risk Profile of Underreporters of Energy Intake Differs from That of Adequate Reporters among Children at Risk of Obesity. (PubMed)

The Cardiometabolic Risk Profile of Underreporters of Energy Intake Differs from That of Adequate Reporters among Children at Risk of Obesity. Misreporting of energy intake (EI) in nutritional epidemiology is a concern because of information bias, and tends to occur differentially in obese compared with nonobese subjects.We examined characteristics of misreporters within a cohort of children with a parental history of obesity and the bias introduced by underreporting.The QUebec Adipose (...) and Lifestyle InvesTigation in Youth (QUALITY) cohort included 630 Caucasian children aged 8-10 y at recruitment with ≥1 obese parent [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) >30 or waist circumference >102 cm (men), >88 cm (women)] and free of diabetes or severe illness. Children on antihypertensive medications or following a restricted diet were excluded. Child and parent characteristics were measured directly or by questionnaire. Three 24-h dietary recalls were administered by phone by a dietitian. Goldberg's

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2019 Journal of Nutrition

15. Impact of rapid weight loss on risk reduction of developing arterial hypertension in severely obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A single-institution experience using the Framingham Hypertension Risk Score. (PubMed)

Impact of rapid weight loss on risk reduction of developing arterial hypertension in severely obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A single-institution experience using the Framingham Hypertension Risk Score. Morbid obesity is strongly associated with hypertension.The objective of this study is to compare the risk of developing hypertension before and after bariatric surgery.U.S. university hospital.We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2010 (...) blood pressure values at 12-month follow-up, the systolic blood pressure was reduced 11.4 mm Hg (P < .01) and the diastolic blood pressure was reduced 4.4 mm Hg (P = .07). The percentage of estimated body mass index loss at 12-month follow-up was 71.7%.Sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass significantly diminish the risk of developing hypertension in morbidly obese patients. Prospective studies are needed to better comprehend these findings.Copyright © 2019 American Society for Bariatric

2019 Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases

16. Obesity Is the Most Common Risk Factor for Chronic Liver Disease: Results From a Risk Stratification Pathway Using Transient Elastography. (PubMed)

Obesity Is the Most Common Risk Factor for Chronic Liver Disease: Results From a Risk Stratification Pathway Using Transient Elastography. Obesity has been associated with liver fibrosis, yet guidelines do not emphasize it as an independent risk factor in which to have a high index of suspicion of advanced disease. We aimed to elucidate the effect of a raised body mass index on the risk of liver disease using data from a community risk stratification pathway.We prospectively recruited patients (...) from a primary care practice with hazardous alcohol use and/or type 2 diabetes and/or obesity. Subjects were invited for a transient elastography reading. A threshold of ≥8.0 kPa defined an elevated reading consistent with clinically significant liver disease.Five hundred seventy-six patients participated in the pathway; of which, 533 patients had a reliable reading and 66 (12.4%) had an elevated reading. Thirty-one percent of patients with an elevated reading had obesity as their only risk factor

2019 American Journal of Gastroenterology

17. Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors

Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors Discover Portal Discover Portal Being overweight or obese is linked with heart disease even without other metabolic risk factors Published on 7 November 2017 doi: People with certain metabolic risk factors who are obese are two and a half times as likely to develop heart disease as healthy people (...) of normal weight. But those who are obese without these other risk factors still have a 28% increased risk of heart disease compared with healthy people of normal weight. This suggests excess weight should be seen as an independent risk factor, challenging the idea that people can be “fat but fit”. Metabolic risk factors for heart disease cluster together and in this large study the researchers defined “metabolically healthy” as not having; high blood pressure, raised blood sugar, high triglyceride

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

18. Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children

Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children Discover Portal Discover Portal Takeaways linked to increased cardiovascular risk factors and obesity in children Published on 13 February 2018 doi: Children who eat takeaways once or more each week have more body fat and higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) “bad” cholesterol levels than those who never or hardly ever eat them (...) . Their diets were also higher in fat and lower in protein and calcium. This cross-sectional study looked in depth at eating habits and risk markers for coronary heart disease, obesity and diabetes in 2,529 children in England. Though this type of study can only show an association between takeaways and risk markers, it is one of the first of its type, and the results do give cause for concern. Increasing numbers of people are eating takeaways in the UK. Local authorities and healthcare professionals

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

19. A behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce risk of diabetes

A behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce risk of diabetes A behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce risk of diabetes Discover Portal Discover Portal A behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce risk of diabetes Published on 4 November 2015 doi: This large NIHR-funded UK trial found that a behavioural intervention for obese pregnant women did not reduce their risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy, or having a baby (...) result does emphasise the need to follow NICE recommendations to test for diabetes in all pregnant women with obesity. Share your views on the research. Why was this study needed? Obesity rates in UK women have risen between 1993 and 2011 from 16% to 26%. Rates of gestational diabetes are also increasing. Women who are obese when they become pregnant have a higher risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, or having babies that are on average larger than the duration of pregnancy would predict

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

20. Contributory Risk and Management of Comorbidities of Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes Mellitus, Hyperlipidemia, and Metabolic Syndrome in Chronic Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Contributory Risk and Management of Comorbidities of Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes Mellitus, Hyperlipidemia, and Metabolic Syndrome in Chronic Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Circulation. 2016;134:e535–e578. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000450 December 6, 2016 e535 CLINICAL STATEMENTS AND GUIDELINES T he comorbidities of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome are common in patients with heart failure (HF (...) of overweight and obesity 6 in the general population and in patients with increased cardiovascular risk, and a recent report from the Eighth Joint Na- tional Committee addressed the management of hypertension. 7 However, these guidelines did not specifically address the management of such comorbidities in patients with HF. Similarly, the most recent ACCF/AHA HF practice guidelines 8 in 2013 addressed the overall management of comorbidities in patients with HF in broad terms, but again, specific

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2016 American Heart Association

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