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Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory

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1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pharyngitis: risk of peritonsillar abscess

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pharyngitis: risk of peritonsillar abscess Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pharyngitis: risk of peritonsillar abscess'', 1 January 2019 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pharyngitis: risk of peritonsillar abscess Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  (...)  |  Spotlight Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pharyngitis: risk of peritonsillar abscess To relieve fever or sore throat, it is better not to use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), but to use paracetamol instead. In 2017, an epidemiological study was carried out on the risks of peritonsillar abscess after pharyngitis. From the database of the Observatory of General Medicine based on input from more than 120 doctors in France, the analysis covered 105 802 pharyngitis

2019 Prescrire

2. Are Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Useful for Analgesia in Patients With Traumatic Corneal Abrasions?

Are Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Useful for Analgesia in Patients With Traumatic Corneal Abrasions? Are Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Useful for Analgesia in Patients With Traumatic Corneal Abrasions? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 73, Issue 2, Pages 157–159 Are Topical Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Useful for Analgesia in Patients (...) With Traumatic Corneal Abrasions? x Jason R. West , MD (EBEM Commentator) Department of Emergency Medicine, Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center, Bronx, NY DOI: | Publication History Published online: December 04, 2018 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home Message There is no strong evidence to suggest that topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs provide adequate analgesia for patients with traumatic corneal abrasions, yet there is low-quality evidence to suggest that the drugs decreased

2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

3. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) toxicity - emergency management

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) toxicity - emergency management

2017 DynaMed Plus

4. Effects of peri-operative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on post-operative kidney function for adults with normal kidney function. (PubMed)

Effects of peri-operative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on post-operative kidney function for adults with normal kidney function. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) provide effective analgesia during the post-operative period but can cause acute kidney injury (AKI) when used peri-operatively (at or around the time of surgery). This is an update of a Cochrane review published in 2007.This review looked at the effect of NSAIDs used in the peri-operative period on post-operative

2018 Cochrane

5. Are Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Safe and Effective for Treatment of Acute Renal Colic (SRS Therapy)

Are Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Safe and Effective for Treatment of Acute Renal Colic (SRS Therapy) TAKE-HOME MESSAGE For patients presenting with acute renal colic, treatment with nonsteroidal anti- in?ammatory drugs offers effective pain relief with fewer adverse effects than opioids or paracetamol. Are Nonsteroidal Anti-in?ammatory Drugs Safe and Effective for Treatment of Acute Renal Colic? EBEM Commentators Katie Pettit, MD Julie L. Welch, MD Department of Emergency Medicine (...) Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis, IN Results A total of 36 randomized controlled trials (including 4,887 patients) from 16 countries were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Outcomes for reduction in pain at 30 minutes found that nonsteroidal anti- in?ammatory drugs had bene?t over opioids (mean difference –5.58 on a 100-point scale; 95% con?dence interval [CI]–10.22 to –0.95); however, there was sub- stantial heterogeneity across studies (I 2 ¼81%), and subgroup

2018 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

6. Are Corticosteroids Superior to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in the Treatment of Acute Gout? (SRS Therapy)

Are Corticosteroids Superior to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in the Treatment of Acute Gout? (SRS Therapy) TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Corticosteroids provide pain relief similar to that of nonsteroidal anti- in?ammatory drugs for acute gout, with fewer adverse effects. Are Corticosteroids Superior to Nonsteroidal Anti-in?ammatory Drugs in the Treatment of Acute Gout? EBEM Commentators Joseph W. Watkins IV, MD Rawle A. Seupaul, MD Department of Emergency Medicine University of Arkansas (...) for Medical Sciences Little Rock, AR Results The search identi?ed 529 refer- ences; 6 trials evaluating 817 pa- tients met inclusion criteria. The overallriskofbiaswaslowinthese trials, whereas the quality of the evidence was rated as low to mod- erate according to GRADE criteria. Themeta-analysisdemonstratedno difference between corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-in?ammatory drugs for the following outcomes: short-term pain relief ( 7days), time to resolution of pain, and requirement for additional

2018 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

7. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for cancer pain in adults. (PubMed)

Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for cancer pain in adults. Pain is a common symptom with cancer, and 30% to 50% of all people with cancer will experience moderate to severe pain that can have a major negative impact on their quality of life. Non-opioid drugs are commonly used to treat cancer pain, and are recommended for this purpose in the World Health Organization (WHO) cancer pain treatment ladder, either alone or in combination with opioids.A previous Cochrane review (...) that examined the evidence for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or paracetamol, alone or combined with opioids, for cancer pain was withdrawn in 2015 because it was out of date; the date of the last search was 2005. This review, and another on paracetamol, updates the evidence.To assess the efficacy of oral NSAIDs for cancer pain in adults, and the adverse events reported during their use in clinical trials.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Cochrane

8. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fibromyalgia in adults. (PubMed)

Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fibromyalgia in adults. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in the treatment of pain in fibromyalgia, despite being considered not to be effective.To assess the analgesic efficacy, tolerability (drop-out due to adverse events), and safety (serious adverse events) of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for fibromyalgia in adults.We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase for randomised controlled trials from

2017 Cochrane

9. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain in women with endometriosis. (PubMed)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain in women with endometriosis. Endometriosis is a common gynaecological condition that affects women and can lead to painful symptoms and infertility. It greatly affects women's quality of life, impacting their careers, everyday activities, sexual and nonsexual relationships and fertility. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are most commonly used as first-line treatment for women with pain associated with endometriosis.To assess effects

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2017 Cochrane

10. Are Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Efficacious in Relieving Biliary Colic Pain?

Are Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Efficacious in Relieving Biliary Colic Pain? Are Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Efficacious in Relieving Biliary Colic Pain? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 70, Issue 6, Pages 822–824 Are Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Efficacious in Relieving Biliary Colic Pain? x Brit Long , MD (EBEM Commentator) , x Michael D. April , MD, DPhil (...) (EBEM Commentator) Department of Emergency Medicine, SAUSHEC, Fort Sam Houston, TX DOI: | Publication History Published online: April 28, 2017 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home Message Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are beneficial in managing biliary colic pain compared with placebo. No difference was found in pain relief when nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were compared with opioids. Methods Data Sources Investigators searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled

2017 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

11. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen'', 1 January 2016 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |  (...)  |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): avoid cox-2 inhibitors, diclofenac and high-dose ibuprofen When pain medication is required, paracetamol (alias acetaminophen) is the reference drug. Among the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), naproxen or ibuprofen (not exceeding 1200 mg a day) are the drugs that carry the least exposure to cardiac disorders. When pain medication is needed

2016 Prescrire

12. Preemptive use of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for inflammatory events (pain, edema, and trismus) relief after surgical removal of third molars: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

Preemptive use of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for inflammatory events (pain, edema, and trismus) relief after surgical removal of third molars: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate

2019 PROSPERO

13. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk for bleeding after gastrointestinal surgery

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk for bleeding after gastrointestinal surgery Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk for bleeding after gastrointestinal surgery We use cookies on this website. By using this site, you agree that we may store and access cookies on your device. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk for bleeding after gastrointestinal surgery Share (...) : Reading time approx. 4 minutes This document was published more than 2 years ago. The nature of the evidence may have changed. NSAIDs are a class of drugs that are anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic but which also leads to an increased risk of bleeding. SBU Enquiry Service consists of systematic literature searches to highlight studies that can address questions received by the SBU Enquiry Service from Swedish healthcare or social service providers. Relevant references are compiled by an SBU

2015 Swedish Council on Technology Assessement

14. Radiologic parameters of ankylosing spondylitis patients treated with anti-TNF-α versus nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and sulfasalazine. (PubMed)

Radiologic parameters of ankylosing spondylitis patients treated with anti-TNF-α versus nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and sulfasalazine. Limited data are available on the relationship between treatment agents and sagittal balance in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We investigated radiological features related to treatment agents and compared sagittal balance between patients treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) and those treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (...) (NSAIDs) and sulfasalazine (SSZ).We prospectively enrolled 133 consecutive AS patients. Patients were eligible for the trial if they were under medical treatment with the same treatment agents for at least 1 year. All patients were treated initially with NSAIDs and SSZ. Sixty-nine patients achieved an excellent pain control outcome with these agents (group A). Sixty-four patients who reported of intractable low back pain were switched to anti-TNF-α treatment (group B). Twelve radiographic parameters

2019 European Spine Journal

15. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for dysmenorrhoea. (PubMed)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for dysmenorrhoea. Dysmenorrhoea is a common gynaecological problem consisting of painful cramps accompanying menstruation, which in the absence of any underlying abnormality is known as primary dysmenorrhoea. Research has shown that women with dysmenorrhoea have high levels of prostaglandins, hormones known to cause cramping abdominal pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are drugs that act by blocking prostaglandin production. They inhibit

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2015 Cochrane

16. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and non-opioids for acute renal colic. (PubMed)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and non-opioids for acute renal colic. Renal colic is acute pain caused by urinary stones. The prevalence of urinary stones is between 10% and 15% in the United States, making renal colic one of the common reasons for urgent urological care. The pain is usually severe and the first step in the management is adequate analgesia. Many different classes of medications have been used in this regard including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

2015 Cochrane

17. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for neuropathic pain. (PubMed)

Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for neuropathic pain. Although often considered to be lacking adequate evidence, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in the management of neuropathic pain. Previous surveys found 18% to 47% of affected people reported using NSAIDs specifically for their neuropathic pain, although possibly not in the United Kingdom (UK).To assess the analgesic efficacy of oral NSAIDs for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, when compared

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2015 Cochrane

18. Regular Use of Aspirin or Non-Aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Is Not Associated With Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer in Two Large Cohort Studies

Regular Use of Aspirin or Non-Aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Is Not Associated With Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer in Two Large Cohort Studies Use of aspirin and/or non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of several cancers, but it is not clear if use of these drugs is associated with risk of pancreatic cancer.We evaluated aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 141,940 participants from the Health

2018 EvidenceUpdates

19. Effect on Risk of Stroke and Acute Myocardial Infarction of Nonselective Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

Effect on Risk of Stroke and Acute Myocardial Infarction of Nonselective Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis There are still debates on the association of increased cardiovascular risk with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because of inconsistent results. Therefore, our study aims to evaluate the transient effects of selective and nonselective NSAIDs on the risk of stroke and acute

2018 EvidenceUpdates

20. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Comparing the Efficacy of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs, Opioids, and Paracetamol in the Treatment of Acute Renal Colic

A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Comparing the Efficacy of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs, Opioids, and Paracetamol in the Treatment of Acute Renal Colic Renal colic is a common, acute presentation of urolithiasis that requires immediate pain relief. European Association of Urology guidelines recommend nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as the preferred analgesia. However, the fear of NSAID adverse effects and the uncertainty about superior analgesic effect have maintained (...) and the overall quality of evidence, the findings of a lower need for rescue analgesia and fewer adverse events, in conjunction with the practical advantages of ease of delivery, suggest that NSAIDs should be the preferred analgesic option for patients presenting to the emergency department with renal colic.In kidney stone-related acute pain episodes in patients with adequate renal function, treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs offers effective and most sustained pain relief, with fewer side

2018 EvidenceUpdates

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