How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

127 results for

Nipple Soreness in Lactation

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

21. Breastfeeding Healthy Term Infants

on pregnancy, breastfeeding, and the infant’s health, e.g., smoking, alcohol, and substance abuse. (see PSBC Guidelines 40,42 and SOGC Guidelines 43, 44 ) Responses to basic queries, e.g., why do my breasts and nipples tingle; what is colostrum; how is milk produced; how often will I breastfeed each day; how long does each breastfeeding take; how do I know I have enough milk; should breastfeeding be painful or sore; and can I return to work and still breastfeed? Potential effects of anesthetics during (...) . Intrapartum Care 9 V aginal Birth 9 Cesarean Birth 10 C. Postpartum Care 10 Key Points 10 2 to 24 hours 11 Guidelines to Assist Mothers to Breastfeed 12 Breastfeeding Positions and Preparation for Feeding .. 12 Infant Attachment on the Breast (Latch) 12 Attachment and Suckling Pattern 13 24 to 72 hours 13 Guidelines to Assess Breastfeeding 14 Breastfeeding Process 14 Maternal Assessment 14 Infant Assessment 14 Infant Weight Loss and Gain 15 Hand Expression 15 Pacifiers 16 Preparation for Hospital

2015 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

22. Methods of milk expression for lactating women. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Methods of milk expression for lactating women. Breastfeeding is important, however not all infants can feed at the breast and methods of expressing milk need evaluation.To assess acceptability, effectiveness, safety, effect on milk composition, contamination and costs of methods of milk expression.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (21 March 2016), handsearched relevant journals and conference proceedings, and contacted experts in the field to seek (...) , 95% CI -0.18 to 0.58; P = 0.30, participants = 142) a large electric pump compared to hand expression (MD 0.10, 95% CI -0.29 to 0.49; P = 0.61, participants = 123), or a large electric pump compared to a manual pump (MD -0.10, 95% CI -0.46 to 0.26; P = 0.59, participants = 141).The level of maternal breast or nipple pain or damage was similar in comparisons of a large electric pump to hand expression (MD 0.02, 95% CI -0.67 to 0.71; P = 0.96, participants = 68). A study comparing a manual

2016 Cochrane

23. Maternal challenges of exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding in Ghana. Full Text available with Trip Pro

milk production, swollen breasts or sore nipples, access to food items and preparation or giving foods. Addressing these challenges would require co-creation of supportive environments between couples and significant others as well as tackling institutional barriers that obstruct adequate breastfeeding among mothers. On complementary feeding, there is the need to form community health volunteers help educate mothers more on how to appropriately use local foods to feed their children. (...) Maternal challenges of exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding in Ghana. Mothers are recommended to exclusively breastfeed their infants for the first six months of their lives. Also, after the sixth month, breastfeeding should continue with added complementary foods to the diets of children. Studies designed to sought the views of mothers on breastfeeding practices are limited. The aim of this study was to explore challenges to breastfeeding practices by considering spatial, societal

2019 PLoS ONE

24. Persistent Pain with Breastfeeding

LH, Cullinane M, et al. Nipple pain, damage, and vasospasm in the ?rst 8 weeks postpartum. Breastfeed Med 2014;9:56–62. 6. Li R, Fein SB, Chen J, et al. Why mothers stop breast- feeding: Mothers’ self-reported reasons for stopping during the ?rst year. Pediatrics 2008;122 (Suppl 2):S69–S76. 7. Amir LH, Dennerstein L, Garland SM, et al. Psychological aspects of nipple pain in lactating women. J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol 1996;17:53–58. 8. Watkins S, Meltzer-Brody S, Zolnoun D, et al. Early (...) are crucial to enable women to achieve their infant feeding goals. Although the literature on persistent nipple and/or breast pain is limited and the differential diagnosis is extensive, a number of etiologies and management strategies are emerg- ing, most of which are based on expert opinion. The highly individualnatureofthebreastfeeding relationship combined with the complexity of the lactating breast, including its anatomy, physiology, and dynamic microbiome, adds chal- lenges to the clinicians

2016 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

25. Establishing breastfeeding

regarding effectiveness of a particular breastfeed 65 Preparation • Review health record and baby feeding chart (if used) • Discuss specific health concerns with the mother as they relate to breastfeeding (e.g. birth experience, comfort, tiredness, healing) • Ask the mother about her breastfeeding experience (e.g. expectations, frequency and length of feeds, baby’s output) • Assess breast and nipple comfort (e.g. breast fullness, nipple tenderness) • Help the mother find a comfortable breastfeeding (...) Certified Lactation Consultant MER Milk ejection reflex NSQHS National Safety and Quality Health Service OR Odds ratio RR Relative risk SIDS Sudden infant death syndrome SSC Skin to skin contact SUDI Sudden and unexpected death in infancy The Code International code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes UNICEF United Nations Children's Emergency Fund WHO World Health Organization Definitions Complementary feeding Feedings provided in addition to breastfeeding when breast milk alone is no longer

2016 Queensland Health

26. Establishing breastfeeding

regarding effectiveness of a particular breastfeed 65 Preparation • Review health record and baby feeding chart (if used) • Discuss specific health concerns with the mother as they relate to breastfeeding (e.g. birth experience, comfort, tiredness, healing) • Ask the mother about her breastfeeding experience (e.g. expectations, frequency and length of feeds, baby’s output) • Assess breast and nipple comfort (e.g. breast fullness, nipple tenderness) • Help the mother find a comfortable breastfeeding (...) Certified Lactation Consultant MER Milk ejection reflex NSQHS National Safety and Quality Health Service OR Odds ratio RR Relative risk SIDS Sudden infant death syndrome SSC Skin to skin contact SUDI Sudden and unexpected death in infancy The Code International code of marketing of breast-milk substitutes UNICEF United Nations Children's Emergency Fund WHO World Health Organization Definitions Complementary feeding Feedings provided in addition to breastfeeding when breast milk alone is no longer

2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

27. The Use of and Experiences With Telelactation Among Rural Breastfeeding Mothers: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

discussed included: breast pain, soreness, and infection (25/83, 30%), use of nipple shields (21/83, 25%), and latch or positioning (17/83, 24%). Most telelactation users (43/47, 91%) expressed satisfaction with the help received.Telelactation is an innovation in the delivery of professional breastfeeding support. This research documents both demand for and positive experiences with telelactation in an underserved population.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02870413; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02870413 (...) The Use of and Experiences With Telelactation Among Rural Breastfeeding Mothers: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial. Telelactation services connect breastfeeding mothers to remotely located lactation consultants through audio-visual technology and can increase access to professional breastfeeding support in rural areas.The objective of this study was to identify maternal characteristics associated with the demand for and use of telelactation and to describe visit

2019 Journal of medical Internet research Controlled trial quality: uncertain

28. Guidelines for Hospital Discharge of the Breastfeeding Term Newborn and Mother: The Going Home Protocol,

, Number 1, 2014 ª Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. DOI: 10.1089/bfm.2014.9996 3 Table 1. Maternal Risk Factors for Lactation Problems Factors History/social Primiparity Intention to both breastfeed and bottle or formula feed at less than 6 weeks Intention to use paci?ers/dummies and/or arti?cial nipples/teats at less than 6 weeks Early intention/necessity to return to school or work History of previous breastfeeding problems or breastfed infant with slow weight gain History of infertility Conception (...) surgery, including cosmetic procedures (important to ask—not always obvious on exam) Previous breast abscess Maternal obesity (body mass index ‡ 30 kg/m 2 ) Extremely or persistently sore nipples Failure of ‘‘secretory activation’’ lactogenesis II. (Milk did not noticeably ‘‘come in’’ by 72 hours postpartum. This may be dif?cult to evaluate if mother and infant are discharged from the hospital in the ?rst 24–48 hours postpartum.) Mother unable to hand-express colostrum Need for breastfeeding

2014 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

29. Deep breast pain during lactation: a case-control study in Sweden investigating the role of Candida albicans Full Text available with Trip Pro

Deep breast pain during lactation: a case-control study in Sweden investigating the role of Candida albicans Deep breast pain during lactation, with or without accompanying nipple pain and soreness continues to be anecdotally linked to infection by Candia albicans despite lack of robust evidence in the literature that Candida albicans is the cause of women's breast symptoms.A case-control study of breastfeeding women in Sweden with (n 35) and without (n 35) symptoms that may be attributable (...) to Candida albicans was carried out. The symptoms were radiating, burning and penetrating or non-penetrating breast pain with or without associated nipple pain during or after breastfeeding. The primary aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that breastfeeding women with symptoms commonly associated with Candida albicans infection will have a growth of Candida albicans in their breast milk significantly more often than women without these symptoms. A secondary aim was comparison of breastfeeding

2018 International Breastfeeding Journal

30. Breastfeeding-Friendly Physician?s Office: Optimizing Care for Infants and Children

for this child. Provide educational material that highlights the many ways in which breastfeeding is superior to formula feeding. Encourage attendance of both parents at prenatal breastfeeding classes. Direct education and educa- tional material to all family members involved in childcare (father, grandparents, etc.). 1,13,26 The father of the infant is particularly important in support of the mother. 26 Identify patients with lactation risk fac- tors (such as ?at or inverted nipples, history of breast (...) a written breastfeeding employee policy and provide a lactation room with supplies for your employees who breastfeed or express milk at work. 16,38,39 (II-2, III) For countries withlongpaidmaternity leaves (forexample, 12 months in Germany), this may not be as relevant as for countries with no or short paid maternity leaves. 14. Acquire or maintain a list of community resources (for example, breast pump rental locations) and be knowl- edgeableaboutreferralprocedures.Referexpectantand new parents to peer

2013 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

31. Mother's Milk Messaging: Evaluation of a Bilingual APP to Support Initiation and Exclusive Breastfeeding in New Mothers

management, the investigators consider this may be a promising strategy to increase breastfeeding. The investigators developed theoretically-based text message content along with breast feeding informational and video content designed for delivery via closed private groups on social media based on formative work and then conducted a pilot study to text the effects of interactive messaging sent over a 12 week period (i.e. 6 weeks prior and after birth) that targeted barriers (e.g. insufficient milk, pain (...) /sore nipples, breastfeeding in public, among others) on exclusivity and continuation of breastfeeding. The investigators innovative approach, called Mother's Milk Messaging (MMM) specifically targets low-income and minority mothers and has the potential to reach unprecedented numbers of mothers, to be standardized for later scalability, and to be cost-effective. While Text4Baby uses a similar approach, the text messages are not interactive and they do not address specific issues with breastfeeding

2016 Clinical Trials

32. Model Breastfeeding Policy

of breast- feeding, contraindications to breastfeeding, and risk of formula feeding. 13 4. The woman’s desire to breastfeed will be documented in her medical record. 5. Mothers will be encouraged to exclusively breastfeed unless medically contraindicated. The method of feed- ing will be documented in the medical record of every infant. (Exclusive breastfeeding is de?ned as providing breastmilk as the sole source of nutrition. Exclusively breastfed babies receive no other liquids or solids (...) report may be used. Every shift, a direct observation of the baby’s position and latch-on during feeding will be performed and documented. 9. Mothers will be encouraged to utilize available breast- feeding resources, including classes, written materials, and video presentations, as appropriate. If clinically indicated, the healthcare professional or nurse will make a referral to a lactation consultant or specialist for additional education and assistance. 10. Breastfeeding mothers will be instructed

2010 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

33. BEST ABCs: Benefits and Effectiveness of Support Offered Through A Breastfeeding Clinic Study

, supplementation, hospitalization) [ Time Frame: 24 hours - 3 months ] Incidence of breastfeeding difficulties (e.g., sore nipples, insufficient milk supply, inadequate latch, engorgement) [ Time Frame: 24 hours - 3 months ] Breastfeeding self efficacy score (Breastfeeding Self Efficacy Scale or BSES) at 2 weeks, 1 month and 3 months [ Time Frame: 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months ] Score of the Edinburgh Post-partum Depression Scale for new mothers [ Time Frame: 3 weeks ] Access to community-based services: Public (...) is eligible Who are breastfeeding and intend to breastfeed their baby upon discharge Whose infant is healthy with no counter indication for discharge at 24 (±12) hours post vaginal birth or 48 (±12) hours post C-section birth and for which the physician (family physician or paediatrician) has agreed that the infant is eligible Who can be contacted by phone or E-mail after hospital discharge Exclusion Criteria: Mothers: Who have had breast surgery Who do not understand French or English Who are unable

2014 Clinical Trials

34. Counseling the Breastfeeding Mother (Follow-up)

stimulation. When an infant sucks on an artificial nipple, the nipple fills his or her mouth and prevents the peristaltic tongue action that occurs with suckling at the breast. Milk flows from the artificial nipple into the mouth without tongue action; flow occurs from the rubber nipple even if the baby's lips are not sealed around the nipple. Because of these differences, an infant is more likely to have a desaturation episode during bottle-feeding than during breastfeeding. Phenomenon of human (...) (ie, unrestricted breastfeeding) is more successful with continued lactation than the mother who breastfeeds according to the clock. The recommendation for mothers to use systematic or controlled timed feedings to help regulate the baby's cycles is fraught with misinformation. A mother should be empowered to follow the internal schedule that is appropriate for her and her baby. Previous Next: Factors Affecting the Maternal Milk Supply True difficulties in supplying milk to the infant are most

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

35. Counseling the Breastfeeding Mother (Treatment)

stimulation. When an infant sucks on an artificial nipple, the nipple fills his or her mouth and prevents the peristaltic tongue action that occurs with suckling at the breast. Milk flows from the artificial nipple into the mouth without tongue action; flow occurs from the rubber nipple even if the baby's lips are not sealed around the nipple. Because of these differences, an infant is more likely to have a desaturation episode during bottle-feeding than during breastfeeding. Phenomenon of human (...) (ie, unrestricted breastfeeding) is more successful with continued lactation than the mother who breastfeeds according to the clock. The recommendation for mothers to use systematic or controlled timed feedings to help regulate the baby's cycles is fraught with misinformation. A mother should be empowered to follow the internal schedule that is appropriate for her and her baby. Previous Next: Factors Affecting the Maternal Milk Supply True difficulties in supplying milk to the infant are most

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

36. Counseling the Breastfeeding Mother (Overview)

stimulation. When an infant sucks on an artificial nipple, the nipple fills his or her mouth and prevents the peristaltic tongue action that occurs with suckling at the breast. Milk flows from the artificial nipple into the mouth without tongue action; flow occurs from the rubber nipple even if the baby's lips are not sealed around the nipple. Because of these differences, an infant is more likely to have a desaturation episode during bottle-feeding than during breastfeeding. Phenomenon of human (...) (ie, unrestricted breastfeeding) is more successful with continued lactation than the mother who breastfeeds according to the clock. The recommendation for mothers to use systematic or controlled timed feedings to help regulate the baby's cycles is fraught with misinformation. A mother should be empowered to follow the internal schedule that is appropriate for her and her baby. Previous Next: Factors Affecting the Maternal Milk Supply True difficulties in supplying milk to the infant are most

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

37. Counseling the Breastfeeding Mother (Diagnosis)

stimulation. When an infant sucks on an artificial nipple, the nipple fills his or her mouth and prevents the peristaltic tongue action that occurs with suckling at the breast. Milk flows from the artificial nipple into the mouth without tongue action; flow occurs from the rubber nipple even if the baby's lips are not sealed around the nipple. Because of these differences, an infant is more likely to have a desaturation episode during bottle-feeding than during breastfeeding. Phenomenon of human (...) (ie, unrestricted breastfeeding) is more successful with continued lactation than the mother who breastfeeds according to the clock. The recommendation for mothers to use systematic or controlled timed feedings to help regulate the baby's cycles is fraught with misinformation. A mother should be empowered to follow the internal schedule that is appropriate for her and her baby. Previous Next: Factors Affecting the Maternal Milk Supply True difficulties in supplying milk to the infant are most

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

38. S3-Guidelines for the Treatment of Inflammatory Breast Disease during the Lactation Period: AWMF Guidelines, Registry No. 015/071 (short version) AWMF Leitlinien-Register Nr. 015/071 (Kurzfassung) Full Text available with Trip Pro

S3-Guidelines for the Treatment of Inflammatory Breast Disease during the Lactation Period: AWMF Guidelines, Registry No. 015/071 (short version) AWMF Leitlinien-Register Nr. 015/071 (Kurzfassung) Breastfeeding is widely acknowledged to be the best and most complete form of nutrition for healthy infants born at term and is associated with numerous benefits in terms of infants' health, growth, immunity and development. However, breastfeeding problems often result in early weaning (...) . Standardized treatment recommendations for breastfeeding-related diseases are necessary to optimize the care offered to breastfeeding women. Evidence and consensus based guidelines for the treatment of puerperal mastitis, sore nipples, engorgement and blocked ducts were developed on the initiative of the National Breastfeeding Committee. These guidelines were developed in accordance with the criteria set up by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften (AWMF

2013 Geburtshilfe Und Frauenheilkunde

39. Breastfeeding Full Text available with Trip Pro

. Medical conditions that do not allow breastfeeding are rare. Mothers who take certain and medications should not breastfeed. Smoking, limited amounts of alcohol, or coffee are not reasons to avoid breastfeeding. Contents Lactation [ ] Main article: When the baby sucks its mother's breast, a hormone called oxytocin compels the milk to flow from the alveoli (lobules), through the ducts (milk canals) into the sacs (milk pools) behind the areola and then into the baby's mouth Changes early in prepare (...) important people here." Position [ ] Main article: Standing mother breastfeeding her baby, Canjambari, Guinea-Bissau, 1973 Correct positioning and technique for latching on are necessary to prevent nipple soreness and allow the baby to obtain enough milk. Babies can successfully latch on to the breast from multiple positions. Each baby may prefer a particular position. The "football" hold places the baby's legs next to the mother's side with the baby facing the mother. Using the "cradle" or "cross-body

2012 Wikipedia

40. Guidance For: Prone Positioning in Adult Critical Care

regarding how to nurse patients in this often, unfamiliar position. Surveyed members reported personal experience with wide array of complications including; • Pressure sores (most cited injury) • Facial / periorbital oedema • IV line / ETT displacement • CVS instability • Ocular injury/corneal abrasions • Brachial plexus injury • Staff injury • CRRT line flow problems6 | Guidance For: Prone Positioning in Adult Critical Care Introduction Most of these complications are preventable and it is hoped (...) Tubes/Lines • Nasogastric feed should be stopped, and the nasogastric tube aspirated (ideally at least 1hr before proning) • Document NG length • Chest drains need to be well secured and placed below the patient. Tubing should run down the patient and be managed by a separate team member. Clamp only if safe to do so. • Adequate length on the remaining lines/cables running up the patient if above the waist, or down the patient if below • Urinary catheter should be spigotted and taped to the inside

2019 Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>