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Nipple Soreness in Lactation

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1. Nipple Soreness in Lactation

Nipple Soreness in Lactation Nipple Soreness in Lactation Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Nipple Soreness in Lactation (...) Nipple Soreness in Lactation Aka: Nipple Soreness in Lactation , Sore Nipples due to Breast Feeding From Related Chapters II. Causes Normal for first several days after birth Resolves in first week if positioning is ok Infant factors Incorrect infant positioning or latching on Incorrect infant positioning Infant with strong clench Ankyloglossia (tight frenulum or tied) Maternal factors difficulties engorgement Nipple vasospasm (e.g. Raynaud's of the nipple) Flat or inverted nipples Local Dermatitis

2018 FP Notebook

2. Breastfeeding Success With the Use of the WHO Syringe Technique for Management of Inverted Nipples in Lactating Women

Breastfeeding Success With the Use of the WHO Syringe Technique for Management of Inverted Nipples in Lactating Women Breastfeeding Success With the Use of the WHO Syringe Technique for Management of Inverted Nipples in Lactating Women - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number (...) of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Breastfeeding Success With the Use of the WHO Syringe Technique for Management of Inverted Nipples in Lactating Women The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details

2018 Clinical Trials

3. Effects of Olive Oil on Nipple Cracking, Nipple Pain and Maternal Satisfactions

nipple and sore nipple in breastfeeding mothers. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of olive oil in the prevention of nipple cracking, nipple pain and ascension of maternal satisfaction in lactating women. It's a prospective, randomized study of 80 lactating women, admitted to TSGH postpartum unit. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups of 40 women. In Group 1 Olive oil will be applied on the nipple after breastfeeding, and in Group 2 drops of breast milk were applied (...) 25, 2018 See Sponsor: National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan Information provided by (Responsible Party): Lin, Chen-xi, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of olive oil in the prevention of nipple cracking, nipple pain and ascension maternal satisfaction in lactating women. It's a prospective, randomized study of 80 lactating women, admitted to Tri-Service General hospital postpartum

2017 Clinical Trials

4. Nipple Soreness in Lactation

Nipple Soreness in Lactation Nipple Soreness in Lactation Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Nipple Soreness in Lactation (...) Nipple Soreness in Lactation Aka: Nipple Soreness in Lactation , Sore Nipples due to Breast Feeding From Related Chapters II. Causes Normal for first several days after birth Resolves in first week if positioning is ok Infant factors Incorrect infant positioning or latching on Incorrect infant positioning Infant with strong clench Ankyloglossia (tight frenulum or tied) Maternal factors difficulties engorgement Nipple vasospasm (e.g. Raynaud's of the nipple) Flat or inverted nipples Local Dermatitis

2015 FP Notebook

5. Methods of milk expression for lactating women. (PubMed)

and large electric pump, reported sore nipples in 7% for both groups and engorgement in 4% using a manual pump versus 6% using an electric pump; and in one study no nipple damage was reported in the hand-expression group, and one case of nipple damage in each of the manual pump and the large electric pump groups.One study examined adverse effects on infants, however as the infants did not all receive their mothers' expressed milk, we have not included the results. Secondary outcomesThe quantity (...) Methods of milk expression for lactating women. Breastfeeding is important, however not all infants can feed at the breast and methods of expressing milk need evaluation.To assess acceptability, effectiveness, safety, effect on milk composition, contamination and costs of methods of milk expression.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (21 March 2016), handsearched relevant journals and conference proceedings, and contacted experts in the field to seek

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2016 Cochrane

6. Deep breast pain during lactation: a case-control study in Sweden investigating the role of Candida albicans (PubMed)

Deep breast pain during lactation: a case-control study in Sweden investigating the role of Candida albicans Deep breast pain during lactation, with or without accompanying nipple pain and soreness continues to be anecdotally linked to infection by Candia albicans despite lack of robust evidence in the literature that Candida albicans is the cause of women's breast symptoms.A case-control study of breastfeeding women in Sweden with (n 35) and without (n 35) symptoms that may be attributable (...) to Candida albicans was carried out. The symptoms were radiating, burning and penetrating or non-penetrating breast pain with or without associated nipple pain during or after breastfeeding. The primary aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that breastfeeding women with symptoms commonly associated with Candida albicans infection will have a growth of Candida albicans in their breast milk significantly more often than women without these symptoms. A secondary aim was comparison of breastfeeding

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2018 International Breastfeeding Journal

7. S3-Guidelines for the Treatment of Inflammatory Breast Disease during the Lactation Period: AWMF Guidelines, Registry No. 015/071 (short version) AWMF Leitlinien-Register Nr. 015/071 (Kurzfassung) (PubMed)

. Standardized treatment recommendations for breastfeeding-related diseases are necessary to optimize the care offered to breastfeeding women. Evidence and consensus based guidelines for the treatment of puerperal mastitis, sore nipples, engorgement and blocked ducts were developed on the initiative of the National Breastfeeding Committee. These guidelines were developed in accordance with the criteria set up by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften (AWMF (...) S3-Guidelines for the Treatment of Inflammatory Breast Disease during the Lactation Period: AWMF Guidelines, Registry No. 015/071 (short version) AWMF Leitlinien-Register Nr. 015/071 (Kurzfassung) Breastfeeding is widely acknowledged to be the best and most complete form of nutrition for healthy infants born at term and is associated with numerous benefits in terms of infants' health, growth, immunity and development. However, breastfeeding problems often result in early weaning

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2013 Geburtshilfe Und Frauenheilkunde

8. Transitioning the Breastfeeding Preterm Infant from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home

). Nursing supplementers may provide additional volume. 38 C. Monitor mothers for nipple soreness. If present, this may be an indication of a shallow latch. Temporary use of silicone nipple shields can be a helpful adjunct for milk transfer and more ef?cient latch-on for preterm infants with shallow latch, 41 although studies report an associ- ation with decreased exclusive breastfeeding 42,43 (IIB). D. Refer and coordinate care, such as providing a written discharge summary for the parents and primary (...) care physician that includes detailed nutrition support rec- ommendations, community support referrals, visiting nurse, skilled lactation consultant visits, and social services. E. Ideally, all mothers discharged from the NICU with a breastfeeding or human milk feeding infant should have follow-up examinations with a trained, skilled lactation professional within 2 to 3 days after dis- charge for ongoing support and troubleshooting. Recommendations for Future Research 1. A survey of neonatologists

2019 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

9. Optimizing Support for Breastfeeding as Part of Obstetric Practice

stopped breastfeeding in the first month, approximately two out of three cited pain or sore, cracked, or bleeding nipples as an important reason ( ). The differential diagnosis of nipple or breast pain is broad and complex. The support of the breastfeeding woman with pain requires time and knowledge. If the symptoms, history, and physical examination do not confer a diagnosis, additional evaluation with a certified lactation professional should be strongly considered ( ). Disrupted lactation is common (...) fat concentration. Infants will sometimes reject the milk from an irradiated breast or show strong preference for the nonirradiated breast, or both ( ). A full milk supply may develop in the nonirradiated breast, however, counseling about nipple soreness and complications is prudent. Breastfeeding is an option for women who have undergone double mastectomy and reconstruction by feeding with a supplemental feeding tube device at the breast ( ). This device has a container, often a syringe, that has

2018 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

10. Breastfeeding - Promoting and Supporting the Initiation, Exclusivity, and Continuation of Breastfeeding in Newborns, Infants and Young Children

Association ® IMS insufficient milk supply LATCH L = how well the baby latches A = audible number of swallows T = type of nipple C = comfort level with breastfeeding H = amount of assistance required when positioning the infant at the breast LC lactation consultant LEAARC Lactation Education Accreditation and Approval Review Committee LGBTQ lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer BACKGROUND7 BEST PRACTICE GUIDELINES • www.RNAO.ca BACKGROUND Breastfeeding - Promoting and Supporting the Initiation (...) Tongue Assessment Tool CASP Critical Appraisal Skills Program CIHI Canadian Institute for Health Information CPNP Canadian Prenatal Nutrition Program EBM expressed breast milk FDA Food and Drug Administration HATLFF Hazelbaker Assessment Tool for Lingual Frenulum Function GDM gestational diabetes mellitus HSV herpes simplex virus IBCLC ® International Board Certified Lactation Consultant ® IBLCE ® International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners ® ILCA ® International Lactation Consultant

2018 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

11. Supplementary Feedings in the Healthy Term Breastfed Neonate

are restless when separated from their infants and actually get less rest. Risk of decreasing breastfeeding duration or exclusivity. Mothers lose the opportunity to learn their infants' normal behavior and early feeding cues. Infants are at highest risk for receiving a supplement between 7 p.m. and 9 a.m. Sore nipples will improve if mother takes a break from breastfeeding Sore nipples are not a function of length of time breastfeeding. Position, latch, and sometimes individual anatomic variation (e.g (...) ., ankyloglossia) are more important. There is no evidence that limiting time at the breast will prevent sore nipples. The nipple should not be rubbed or compressed during breastfeeding even if the feedings are frequent or “clustered.” Problem with latch not addressed. Risk of decreasing breastfeeding duration or cessation of breastfeeding. Risk of breast engorgement. Table A1. Inappropriate Reasons for Supplementation in the Context of a Healthy Newborn and Mother, Responses, and Risks Appendix A2: Sample

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2017 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

12. Oral Thrush - Guidelines for Prescribing Oral Nystatin

(e.g. chlorhexidine 0.12 % oral rinse) Burns will cause significant redness and swelling in the mouth, which should not be seen with oral thrush. Common in bottle-fed infants. causes chronic lesions seen mostly in smokers and males over 30. These are small, translucent white plaques, usually on the tongue. The plaques cannot be wiped off as easily as oral thrush. These lesions can be cancerous, so a biopsy is recommended if this condition is suspected. are one or more shallow, usually painful sores (...) fluids to prevent dehydration. appears as inflammatory, scaly, white or striated patches possibly caused by local trauma to tissue. Adverse drug reaction - sore mouth with diffuse redness and / or bullae / blisters on oral mucosa occuring after initiation of a new medication. (rare) can occur from a few days up to 2 months after starting a medication. Patients with signs / symptoms typical of oral thrush often do not require further investigation, however an assessment by the patient's primary care

2017 medSask

13. Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for Prescribing Topical Antibiotics for impetigo and folliculitis

of impetigo Begins as a single, red sore which forms a blister When the blister breaks, a yellowish exudate dries to form a crust Areas affected are most commonly the face and extremities (arms, legs) Sores are not painful, but may be itchy Multiple lesions may form Minimal redness around lesion Fever is rare Lymph nodes may be tender More severe form of impetigo Presents initially as rapidly enlarging soft bullae with sharp margins Blisters do not have a red border, but surrounding skin may be reddened (...) or immunosuppression are common co-morbidities Slow to heal; high scarring potential Tinea corporis (ringworm) may form similar looking pustules, but has a clear central area surrounded by red, rash-like ring. Refer to Guideline for . Viral skin diseases such as , shingles or which may blister, but have a clear exudate. Herpes simplex or herpes zoster may resemble impetigo; however, the lesions are not honey-coloured. Cold sores usually occur singly around border of lips. Refer to Guideline for Chickenpox lesions

2017 medSask

14. Persistent Pain with Breastfeeding

of dermatologic medicationsinpregnancyandlactation:PartII.Lactation.J Am Acad Dermatol 2014;70:417.e1–e10. 48. Bae YS, Van Voorhees AS, Hsu S, et al. Review of treat- ment options for psoriasis in pregnant or lactating women: From the Medical Board of the National Psoriasis Foun- dation. J Am Acad Dermatol 2012;67:459–477. 49. Livingstone V, Stringer LJ. The treatment of Staphy- loccocus aureus infected sore nipples: A randomized comparative study. J Hum Lact 1999;15:241–246. 50. Arroyo R, Martin V, Maldonado (...) are crucial to enable women to achieve their infant feeding goals. Although the literature on persistent nipple and/or breast pain is limited and the differential diagnosis is extensive, a number of etiologies and management strategies are emerg- ing, most of which are based on expert opinion. The highly individualnatureofthebreastfeeding relationship combined with the complexity of the lactating breast, including its anatomy, physiology, and dynamic microbiome, adds chal- lenges to the clinicians

2016 Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine

15. Establishing breastfeeding

to: o Observe for appropriate breast development, surgical scars, and nipple shape o Reassure the woman when her breasts and nipples are normal and highlight expected breast changes o Triage for additional support following birth 39 Referral • Partner with the woman to develop and document a breastfeeding plan • Offer referral to an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) or expert breastfeeding support service when: o Previous concerns with breastfeeding experienced o Risk (...) expert advice (e.g. from lactation consultant) • Medical review Individualise the care of each mother and baby according to the clinical circumstances EBM: expressed breast milk; BGL: blood glucose level Queensland Clinical Guideline: Establishing breastfeeding Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 4 of 28 Abbreviations BFHI Baby Friendly Health Initiative CI Confidence interval CS Caesarean section EBM Expressed breast milk GP General Practitioner IBCLC International Board

2016 Queensland Health

16. Establishing breastfeeding

to: o Observe for appropriate breast development, surgical scars, and nipple shape o Reassure the woman when her breasts and nipples are normal and highlight expected breast changes o Triage for additional support following birth 39 Referral • Partner with the woman to develop and document a breastfeeding plan • Offer referral to an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) or expert breastfeeding support service when: o Previous concerns with breastfeeding experienced o Risk (...) expert advice (e.g. from lactation consultant) • Medical review Individualise the care of each mother and baby according to the clinical circumstances EBM: expressed breast milk; BGL: blood glucose level Queensland Clinical Guideline: Establishing breastfeeding Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 4 of 28 Abbreviations BFHI Baby Friendly Health Initiative CI Confidence interval CS Caesarean section EBM Expressed breast milk GP General Practitioner IBCLC International Board

2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

17. Newborn Nursing Care Pathway

/cfyt/dental_ care_children/tooth_decay.asp Variance • Refer to POS Intervention • Refer to POS and >24 – 72 hr Variance – thrush Candida (fungus) • White, cheesy patches on the tongue, gums or mucous membranes – won’t rub off • Diaper area – red rash Intervention – thrush Candida (fungus) • Discuss signs, symptoms & treatment • Assess mother’s nipples for thrush (red, itchy, persistent sore nipples, burning, shooting pain) • Both mother and baby need treatment • May affect baby’s feeding • If using (...) palsy) Intervention • Assess baby’s ability to latch without causing pain and damage to nipple • Feeding variations to cope with variances • Dry mucosa, assess hydration status • Refer to appropriate PHCP prn Norm and Normal Variations • Refer to POS Parent education/ Anticipatory Guidance • www.healthlinkbc. ca/healthfiles/ hfile19a.stm Variance • Refer to POS Intervention • Refer to POS Norm and Normal Variations • Refer to POS • May have sucking blister on lips • Tongue may be coated white from

2015 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

18. Breastfeeding Healthy Term Infants

on pregnancy, breastfeeding, and the infant’s health, e.g., smoking, alcohol, and substance abuse. (see PSBC Guidelines 40,42 and SOGC Guidelines 43, 44 ) Responses to basic queries, e.g., why do my breasts and nipples tingle; what is colostrum; how is milk produced; how often will I breastfeed each day; how long does each breastfeeding take; how do I know I have enough milk; should breastfeeding be painful or sore; and can I return to work and still breastfeed? Potential effects of anesthetics during (...) on areola size); infant’s chin is on the breast and the nostrils are clear to breathe. If lips are only parted 45 degrees the infant is likely sucking more on the nipple than the breast tissue and this will contribute to pain during breastfeeding and potentially sore nipples • During the first week a mother may experience nipple sensitivity or sor eness for a few seconds when the infant grasps the breast. 38 If pain continues more than 30 seconds, remove the infant from the breast and start again

2015 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

19. Acute pain management: scientific evidence (3rd Edition)

359 10.7.1 Peripheral nerve blocks 359 10.7.2 Central neural blockade 361 10.8 Acute pain in children with cancer 365 10.8.1 Cancer-related pain 365 10.8.2 Procedure-related pain 365 10.8.3 Treatment-related pain 366 References 367 Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence xvii CONTENTS 11. OTHER SPECIFIC PATIENT GROUPS 385 11.1 The pregnant patient 385 11.1.1 Management of acute pain during pregnancy 385 11.1.2 Management of pain during delivery 390 11.1.3 Pain management during lactation 394

2015 National Health and Medical Research Council

20. Mastitis and breast abscess

-lactating women are S. aureus , enterococci, and anaerobic bacteria (such as Bacteroides spp and anaerobic streptococci). Mastitis should be suspected if a woman has: A painful breast. Fever and/or general malaise. A tender, red, swollen, and hard area of the breast, usually in a wedge-shaped distribution. It is not possible to distinguish clinically between infectious and non-infectious mastitis. Infection is more likely if the woman has a nipple fissure that is infected, or if in a lactating woman (...) as: Non-infectious — breast inflammation due to a non-infectious and/or idiopathic cause. Infectious — infection of breast tissue which usually occurs by retrograde spread through a lactiferous duct or a traumatized nipple. Very rarely, the infection occurs through the lymphatics or by haematogenous spread. A breast abscess is a localized collection of pus within the breast. A lactational abscess is usually located in the peripheral region of the breast, more commonly in the upper and outer quadrant

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

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