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Nerve Conduction Velocity

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2421. The effect of cryotherapy on nerve conduction velocity, pain threshold and pain tolerance. (Full text)

The effect of cryotherapy on nerve conduction velocity, pain threshold and pain tolerance. To determine the impact of the application of cryotherapy on nerve conduction velocity (NCV), pain threshold (PTH) and pain tolerance (PTO).A within-subject experimental design; treatment ankle (cryotherapy) and control ankle (no cryotherapy).Hospital-based physiotherapy laboratory.A convenience sample of adult male sports players (n = 23).NCV of the tibial nerve via electromyogram as well as PTH and PTO (...) via pressure algometer. All outcome measures were assessed at two sites served by the tibial nerve: one receiving cryotherapy and one not receiving cryotherapy.In the control ankle, NCV, PTH and PTO did not alter when reassessed. In the ankle receiving cryotherapy, NCV was significantly and progressively reduced as ankle skin temperature was reduced to 10 degrees C by a cumulative total of 32.8% (p<0.05). Cryotherapy led to an increased PTH and PTO at both assessment sites (p<0.05). The changes

2007 British Journal of Sports Medicine PubMed

2422. Effects of glycemic control and aldose reductase inhibition on nerve conduction velocity. (PubMed)

Effects of glycemic control and aldose reductase inhibition on nerve conduction velocity. In two studies of patients with diabetes who did not have neurologic symptoms, nerve conduction velocity was increased either by an improvement in glucose control or by the administration of the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil. In a 1981 study by Graf et al, glycemic control and motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities were evaluated in 18 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes before (...) and after one, three, six, and 12 months of antihyperglycemic therapy. There was an improvement in motor nerve conduction velocity (median motor, p less than 0.01; peroneal motor, p less than 0.05; and tibial motor, p less than 0.05), which was associated with the improvement in fasting plasma glucose levels after three months for some motor nerves (median motor: r = -0.62, p less than 0.01; peroneal motor: r = -0.50, p less than 0.05). A direct linear relationship between the change in fasting glucose

1985 The American journal of medicine

2423. Can motor nerve conduction velocity predict foot problems in diabetic subjects over a 6-year outcome period? (PubMed)

Can motor nerve conduction velocity predict foot problems in diabetic subjects over a 6-year outcome period? This study examined motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and other peripheral nerve and vascular tests as predictors for foot ulceration, amputation, and mortality in diabetes over a 6-year follow-up period.We recruited 169 diabetic subjects (without significant peripheral vascular disease with an ankle brachial pressure index [ABPI] >/=0.75) for the study and separated them (...) into groups (to ensure diversity of nerve function). The control group consisted of 22 nondiabetic people. At baseline, all subjects underwent assessment of MNCV; vibration, pressure, and temperature perception thresholds; peripheral vascular function; and other diabetes assessments.Over the 6-year outcome period, 37.3% of the diabetic subjects developed at least one new ulcer, 11.2% had a lower-limb amputation (LLA) (minor or major), and 18.3% died. Using multivariate Cox's regression analysis (RR [95

2002 Diabetes Care

2424. Determination of the distribution of nerve conduction velocities in chain saw operators. (Full text)

Determination of the distribution of nerve conduction velocities in chain saw operators. By measuring the distribution of conduction velocities (DCV) in sensory fibres of the median nerve, the effects of local vibration on all faster and slower large myelinated nerve fibres were examined in 10 male chain saw operators (three operators had frequent attacks of white finger; the attacks were only occasional in four and negative in three). All parameters of DCV, and conventional sensory nerve (...) conduction velocity were significantly slowed in the chain saw operators. It is suggested that local vibration affects the faster and slower nerve fibres; parameters of the DCV are sensitive indicators of both the neurological and vascular effects.

1988 British Journal of Industrial Medicine PubMed

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