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Nerve Conduction Velocity

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181. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations. (Abstract)

Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations. The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN (...) of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed

2015 International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

182. Effects of Light Emitting Diode Irradiation on the Conduction Parameters of the Superficial Radial Nerve

study will be conducted by measuring nerve conduction on the superficial radial nerve of healthy subjects (n=64). One baseline measurement and five post-irradiation recordings (2-min interval each) will be performed of the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and peak latency (PL) and peak amplitude (PA). The experimental group (=32) will receive an irradiation of 2 J/cm2 with an infrared LED device (Dynatronics Solaris Model 705), while the placebo group will be treated by sham irradiation. The purpose (...) of this study is to investigate the effects of LED light on the conduction velocity and amplitude of the superficial radial nerve. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Peripheral Neuropathy Device: Superluminous light diode Not Applicable Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 32 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator) Official Title

2012 Clinical Trials

183. Motor nerve conduction study in patients on diphenylhydantoin therapy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Motor nerve conduction study in patients on diphenylhydantoin therapy. Mean motor conduction velocity of posterior tibial nerves was significantly reduced in epileptic patients treated with diphenylhydantoin formore than 10 years or in patients with serum diphenylhydantoin level above 20 mug/ml. Subnormal serum folate was not responsible for this reduction and clinical peripheral neuropathy was infrequent.

1975 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

184. Sensory conduction in peroneal and posterior tibial nerves using averaging techniques Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sensory conduction in peroneal and posterior tibial nerves using averaging techniques A method of obtaining pure sensory nerve conduction velocities in the lower extremities is described. This involves the use of electronic summation (signal averaging). Potentials were obtained and velocities calculated from all normal subjects examined. In patients with peripheral neuropathies it was often possible to obtain nerve velocities with signal amplitudes as low as 0·1 μV and these were often slower (...) than those obtained from the normal subjects. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are discussed. It is of significant clinical value in that pure sensory nerve conduction velocities can be measured in the legs when this may be the only valuable parameter in the absence of motor involvement. In addition, investigation of neuropathies at an earlier stage of development and recovery may be facilitated. It is hoped that in the future this technique of obtaining low amplitude responses

1973 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

185. Experimental studies of the effects of extrinsic factors on conduction in normal and demyelinated nerve. 1. Temperature. Full Text available with Trip Pro

. In addition, the lower the initial velocity increment per degree of temperature elevation, the lower was the temperature at which conduction block began to occur. Except for a few cases in which the recorded action potential was bimodal, with response at both normal and prolonged latency, the results tended to indicate a remarkedly uniform involvement of the sciatic nerve within the region of temperature control. (...) Experimental studies of the effects of extrinsic factors on conduction in normal and demyelinated nerve. 1. Temperature. Previous studies in experimentally demyelinated mammalian nerves have demonstrated that a reversible conduction block occurs with small increases of temperature within the animal's normal body temperature range. This phenomenon is believed to be the mechanism for clinical temperature effects in multiple sclerosis. This study examines some quantitative thermal relationships

1976 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

186. Motor and sensory conduction in the musculocutaneous nerve. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Motor and sensory conduction in the musculocutaneous nerve. Motor and sensory conduction velocity in the musculocutaneous nerve were determined in 51 normal subjects. The maximal velocity from the anterior cervical triangle to the axilla was the same in motor and sensory fibres. The conduction velocity decreased 2m/s per 10 years increase of age. It was 70 m/s at 15-24 years and 58 m/s at 65-74 years. The velocity of the slowest components in sensory fibres was 17 m/s. Three selected case

1976 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

187. Nerve conduction during Wallerian degeneration in the baboon Full Text available with Trip Pro

two to three days. There was no change in maximal motor conduction velocity or in distal latency until the muscle response to nerve stimulation was severely reduced in amplitude. At this stage there was a consistent increase in distal latency, sometimes associated with a mild reduction in maximal motor velocity in the leg. There was no change in the velocity of ascending nerve action potentials. Histological studies confirmed the presence of degeneration in the terminal parts of the intramuscular (...) Nerve conduction during Wallerian degeneration in the baboon Conduction in the lateral popliteal nerve of the baboon was studied during the course of Wallerian degeneration. Six nerves were examined. In each case the muscle response to nerve stimulation and the ascending nerve action potential were recorded daily until the nerve became inexcitable. The muscle response to nerve stimulation disappeared after four to five days, but ascending nerve action potentials could be recorded for a further

1972 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

188. Sensory conduction of the sural nerve in polyneuropathy Full Text available with Trip Pro

velocities were over 40 m/s and there was no significant change with age, unlike the median nerve in which a highly significant slowing occurred with age. Comparison of the results of sural and median sensory conduction studies in 300 consecutive patients screened for sensory polyneuropathy confirms the value of sural nerve sensory studies as a routine screening test, and confirms the belief that the changes in polyneuropathy are usually more prominent in lower limb nerves. It is therefore suggested (...) Sensory conduction of the sural nerve in polyneuropathy Using surface electrodes, sensory nerve action potentials (SAP) have been recorded in the proximal segment (mid-calf to lateral malleolus) and the distal segment (lateral malleolus to toe 5) of the sural nerve and in the median nerve in 79 control subjects. The values obtained for the distal segment of the sural nerve varied widely and in seven apparently normal subjects no SAP could be distinguished. In the proximal segment conduction

1974 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

189. Nerve biopsy and conduction studies in diabetic neuropathy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

, segmental demyelination was found in only a few fibres. Axonal degeneration and Schwann cell damage seem to proceed independently of each other. The relation between recorded conduction velocity and that expected from the diameter of the largest fibres indicated that slowing of 20 to 30% was due to causes other than fibre loss; a grossly diminished conduction velocity was caused mainly by fibre loss. Electrophysiological findings in the sural nerve were largely representative of findings in other nerves (...) Nerve biopsy and conduction studies in diabetic neuropathy. Morphological findings in sural nerves were related to nerve conduction in 12 patients with diabetic neuropathy, five with mainly sensory involvement, four with severe, symmetrical sensory-motor polyneuropathy, and three with multiple mononeuropathy. All had loss of large and small myelinated and of unmyelinated fibres, even early in the disease; segmental remyelination was the most prominent myelin alteration in teased fibres

1977 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

190. Sensory nerve conduction in the upper limbs at various stages of diabetic neuropathy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sensory nerve conduction in the upper limbs at various stages of diabetic neuropathy In 59 diabetic patients, sensory nerve potentials were recorded at various sites along the course of the median nerve. Pathological responses were characterized by reduced amplitude, desynchronization and decreased conduction velocity (CV). Four groups of patients with increasingly severe nerve dysfunction were distinguished. The presence and severity of clinical neuropathy in the upper limbs could be related (...) to decreased maximal sensory nerve CV in the proximal segment of the limbs. When maximal sensory nerve CV was normal above the wrist, neuropathy usually remained latent. In severe cases where no sensory nerve potentials could be recorded, the cerebral evoked potentials nonetheless permitted a precise evaluation of the somatosensory conduction. In these cases, maximal sensory nerve CV was very low. In five patients with a so-called diabetic mononeuropathy, abnormal nerve potentials were recorded

1973 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

191. Recovery of nerve conduction after a pneumatic tourniquet: observations on the hind-limb of the baboon Full Text available with Trip Pro

motor conduction velocity was reduced in recovering nerves. It was also reduced when a cuff pressure of 500 mm Hg was used, which was insufficient to produce persistent conduction block. In such cases a reduced velocity without evidence of block could be demonstrated 24 hours after compression. Ascending nerve action potentials were recorded from the sciatic nerve in the thigh, with stimulation at the ankle. Before compression the fastest afferent fibres had a significantly higher velocity than (...) Recovery of nerve conduction after a pneumatic tourniquet: observations on the hind-limb of the baboon A small pneumatic cuff inflated around the knee was used to produce tourniquet paralysis in baboons. A cuff pressure of 1,000 mm Hg maintained for one to three hours produced paralysis of distal muscles lasting up to three months. Nerve conduction studies showed that most of the motor fibres to the abductor hallucis muscle were blocked at the level of the cuff and that they conducted impulses

1972 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

192. Normal sensory conduction in the nerves of the leg in man Full Text available with Trip Pro

into several components, and electronic averaging was used routinely to analyse the shape of the potentials. The maximum sensory conduction velocity was 56·5 m/sec, SD 3·4 m/sec, in proximal; and 46·1 m/sec, SD 3·7 m/sec, in distal segments of the nerves (subjects 15 to 30 years, 34 to 36°C). Slowing of conduction with increasing age was the same proximally and distally (subjects 40 to 65 years: proximally 53·1 m/sec, SD 4·6 m/sec; distally 42·5 m/sec, SD 5·5 m/sec, 34 to 36°C). The velocity in the slowest (...) Normal sensory conduction in the nerves of the leg in man For comparison with findings in neuropathy, sensory conduction was studied along distal and proximal segments of the superficial peroneal, sural, and posterior tibial nerves in 71 healthy subjects 15 to 72 years of age and normal values were established (Table 2). In the distal segments of the nerves of the leg the amplitudes of the sensory potentials were one tenth those in the nerves of the upper extremity; the potentials were split up

1971 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

193. Median and ulnar nerve conduction determinations in the Erb's point--axilla segment in normal subjects. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Median and ulnar nerve conduction determinations in the Erb's point--axilla segment in normal subjects. Twenty-one median and 22 ulnar nerves were tested in 12 patients for motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and motor nerve conduction time (MNCT) in the segments from Erb's point (N) to axilla (A) bilaterally. It was found that on this segment for both nerves, MNCV values equal to or smaller than 51 m/s or conduction times equal to or longer than 4 ms are to be considered abnormal (...) . For comparative studies and for checking the normality of the tested nerves in their entire length, the more distally located segments in the same nerve were also tested. For diagnostic purposes, the differences between right and left MNCV or MNCT values determined in the same person on N-A segments of homologous nerves were analysed. Motor nerve conduction velocity or MNCT determinations on the N-A nerve segment are expected to replace MNCV determinations on the longer N-AE (AE=100 mm above elbow) nerve

1978 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

194. Influence of dietary myoinositol on nerve conduction and inositol phospholipids in normal and diabetic rats. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Influence of dietary myoinositol on nerve conduction and inositol phospholipids in normal and diabetic rats. Observations have been made on motor conduction velocity in the tibial nerve of rats given 35% myoinositol in the diet. Comparison between the values before and with up to nine weeks of dosing revealed no alteration in conduction velocity. In such animals, the free myoinositol content in the sciatic nerve was increased; there was no detectable alteration in the lipid inositol (...) concentration. In a second series of experiments, tibial motor nerve conduction velocity in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes was compared with conduction velocity in diabetic animals given 1% supplementary dietary myoinositol, and with a control group of nondiabetic rats. Conduction velocity was reduced in the diabetic animals, but no influence from the added dietary myoinositol was detected. No statistically significantly difference in sciatic nerve myoinositol was demonstrated, but the sorbitol

1978 Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

195. Computation of Impulse Initiation and Saltatory Conduction in a Myelinated Nerve Fiber Full Text available with Trip Pro

Computation of Impulse Initiation and Saltatory Conduction in a Myelinated Nerve Fiber A mathematical model of the electrical properties of a myelinated nerve fiber is given, consisting of the Hodgkin-Huxley ordinary differential equations to represent the membrane at the nodes of Ranvier, and a partial differential cable equation to represent the internodes. Digital computer solutions of these equations show an impulse arising at a stimulating electrode and being propagated away, approaching (...) a constant velocity. Action potential curves plotted against distance show discontinuities in slope, proportional to the nodal action currents, at the nodes. Action potential curves plotted against time, at the nodes and in the internodes, show a marked difference in steepness of the rising phase, but little difference in peak height. These results and computed action current curves agree fairly accurately with published experimental data from frog and toad fibers.

1962 Biophysical journal

196. Autologous transplantation with fewer fibers repairs large peripheral nerve defects Full Text available with Trip Pro

, small gap sleeve suture was used in both proximal and distal terminals to allow repair of the injured common peroneal nerve. At three months postoperatively, recovery of nerve function and morphology was observed using osmium tetroxide staining and functional detection. The results showed that the number of regenerated nerve fibers, common peroneal nerve function index, motor nerve conduction velocity, recovery of myodynamia, and wet weight ratios of tibialis anterior muscle were not significantly (...) Autologous transplantation with fewer fibers repairs large peripheral nerve defects Peripheral nerve injury is a serious disease and its repair is challenging. A cable-style autologous graft is the gold standard for repairing long peripheral nerve defects; however, ensuring that the minimum number of transplanted nerve attains maximum therapeutic effect remains poorly understood. In this study, a rat model of common peroneal nerve defect was established by resecting a 10-mm long right common

2017 Neural Regeneration Research

197. Transplantation of dental pulp stem cells improves long-term diabetic polyneuropathy together with improvement of nerve morphometrical evaluation Full Text available with Trip Pro

polyneuropathy in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.Forty-eight weeks after STZ injection, we transplanted DPSCs into the unilateral hindlimb skeletal muscles. Four weeks after DPSC transplantation (i.e., 52 weeks after STZ injection) the effects of DPSC transplantation on diabetic polyneuropathy were assessed.STZ-induced diabetic rats showed significant reductions in the sciatic motor/sensory nerve conduction velocity, increases in the current perception threshold, and decreases in capillary (...) Transplantation of dental pulp stem cells improves long-term diabetic polyneuropathy together with improvement of nerve morphometrical evaluation Although previous reports have revealed the therapeutic potential of stem cell transplantation in diabetic polyneuropathy, the effects of cell transplantation on long-term diabetic polyneuropathy have not been investigated. In this study, we investigated whether the transplantation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) ameliorated long-term diabetic

2017 Stem cell research & therapy

198. l-Acetyl-carnitine in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Effects on Nerve Protection, Hand Function and Pain Full Text available with Trip Pro

and neurophysiological 4-month study, we enrolled 82 patients and examined 120 hands with CTS of mild to moderate severity. Patients were assessed at baseline and 10, 60 and 120 days after treatment with LAC 500 mg twice daily (BID). All patients underwent a conduction study of the median nerve, the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ) and the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI). The primary endpoint was the sensory conduction velocity (SCV) of the median nerve.The primary endpoint was met (...) l-Acetyl-carnitine in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Effects on Nerve Protection, Hand Function and Pain L-Acetyl-carnitine (LAC) exerts an energetic effect on nerves and muscles. Recently, preclinical experiments have demonstrated a central anti-nociceptive action.Our objective was to assess the effects of LAC on neuroprotection, pain, and function in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a very frequent chronic compressive neuropathy.In a multicentre, examiner-blinded, clinical

2017 CNS drugs

199. NaV1.7 and pain: contribution of peripheral nerves. Full Text available with Trip Pro

tests. With single-fiber recordings from isolated skin, we found (1) a significantly lower prevalence of heat responsiveness to normally mechanosensitive C-fibers, although (2) the rare heat responses seemed quite vigorous, and (3) heat-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide release was normal. In biophysical respects, although electrical excitability, rheobase, and chronaxy were normal, (4) axonal conduction velocity was 20% slower than in congenic wild-type mice (5) and when challenged (...) with double pulses (<100 milliseconds interval), the second AP showed more pronounced latency increase (6). On prolonged electrical stimulation at 2 Hz, (7) activity-dependent slowing of nerve fiber conduction was markedly less, and (8) was less likely to result in conduction failure of the mutant single fibers. Finally, recording of compound APs from the whole saphenous nerve confirmed slower conduction and less activity-dependent slowing as well as the functional absence of a large subpopulation of C

2017 Pain

200. Cavernous Nerve Injury by Radiation Therapy May Potentiate Erectile Dysfunction in Rats. (Abstract)

-induced neurogenic injury in RiED has not been fully established. The cavernous nerves (CN) are postganglionic parasympathetic nerves located beside the prostate gland that assist in penile erection. This study was designed to investigate the role of CN injury, tissue damage, and altered signaling pathways in an RiED rat model.Male rats were exposed to a single dose of 25 Gy prostate-confined RT. Erectile function was evaluated by intracavernous pressure (ICP) measurements conducted both 9 and 14 (...) analysis showed significant impairment of the CN conduction velocity after RT. RT also significantly increased RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) mRNA and protein expression. In addition, penile tissue showed increased apoptosis and fibrosis 14 weeks after RT.RT-induced CN injury may contribute to RiED; this is therefore a rationale for developing novel therapeutic strategies to mitigate CN and tissue damage. Moreover, further investigation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway's role in mitigating RiED

2017 Biology and Physics

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