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Neonatal Teeth

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81. Long term follow up of survivors of childhood cancer

adverse effects on uterine function or pregnancy outcomes, other than increased risk of miscarriage shortly after chemotherapy, related to damage to oocytes. 95 In contrast, abdominopelvic radiotherapy is associated with adverse effects on uterine function with increased risk of late miscarriage, prematurity, low birth weight, stillbirth, neonatal haemorrhage and postpartum haemorrhage. The effect is age related, the younger the patient at treatment the greater the adverse effect on uterine function

2013 SIGN

82. Candida - oral

suspension (unlicensed for use in neonates). See the prescribing information sections on and for information on prescribing these treatments, including contraindications, cautions, adverse effects, and possible drug interactions. Give appropriate lifestyle advice to aid healing and prevent recurrence. In particular: Advise on good dental hygiene. If the child is using an inhaled corticosteroid, advise the following: good inhaler technique; rinsing the mouth with water (or cleaning the teeth) after (...) by Candida albicans . There are different types of oral candidiasis, including pseudomembranous candidiasis (often called oral thrush [which commonly affects neonates]), denture stomatitis (which commonly affects denture wearers), and chronic plaque-like candidiasis (which commonly occurs in men older than 30 years of age, and smokers). Comorbidities that increase the risk of candidal infections include diabetes mellitus, severe anaemia, and immunocompromise (such as due to chemotherapy, radiotherapy

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

83. Richard Lehman’s journal review—25 September 2017

it is missing most of its teeth. It has lost half of its long-distance vision too. , although they manage a swipe at him in their last paragraph, since he ardently wants things to get worse. The FDA is basically a permissive organisation, especially in its fast-track approval system. Since 2007 it has had the power to mandate phase 4 (post-marketing) studies after allowing companies to try their products out on the public. But 46% of such studies on products licensed in 2009-10 still haven’t been completed (...) in the habit of skim-reading, note that the pregnant participants did NOT have “gestational diabetes” (whatever that means) but established type 1 diabetes. In this group, CGM showed definite and large benefit in reducing large-for-dates deliveries, neonatal intensive care admissions and neonatal hypoglycaemia. On the other hand, about half the mums experienced soreness at the monitoring site. How often should you give blood? which concludes that “Over 2 years, more frequent donation than is standard

2017 The BMJ Blog

84. What does the public really know about patient safety at US hospitals? Not much

a chilling tale in the Portland Tribune about a 52-year-old patient who died in 2015 after 12 teeth were pulled at Oregon Health & Science University’s dental surgery clinic. The man’s liver had trouble producing the clotting agents the body needs to stop bleeding. His infected teeth needed to be pulled in order for him to qualify for a liver transplant. However, instead of extracting a couple of teeth and hospitalizing him overnight to make sure his blood clotted properly, Oregon Health & Sciences (...) University pulled 12 teeth at once, observed the man for an hour, and sent him home, a three-and-a-half-hour drive from the hospital. “That series of decisions may have led” to the man’s death judging by interviews with several doctors experienced with liver patients and oral surgery, Budnick reported. One hematologist said, “the pre-surgery test results indicated red flags that were ‘clear.’” A case that raises larger questions Just as bad for the hospital was its attempt to pin the medical mistakes

2017 HealthNewsReview

85. Infective Endocarditis in Childhood: 2015 Update

in which a surgical shunt is constructed or other prosthetic material is left in place. Increasingly, IE develops in the absence of CHD. This circumstance is often associated with central indwelling venous catheters (central lines). The complexities of patient management in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units have increased the risk of IE in children with structurally normal hearts. Currently, in approximately 8% to 10% of pediatric cases, IE develops without structural heart disease or any (...) be a factor in the risk for IE. IE in Newborn Infants In a recent multicenter review, 7.3% of cases of pediatric IE (108 of 1480) were diagnosed in the first month of life. Improved and widely available imaging technology, particularly echocardiography, and increased clinical awareness have greatly facilitated the diagnosis of IE in this patient group. The incidence of neonatal IE has increased in the past 2 decades in large measure because of the increasing use of invasive techniques to manage neonates

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2015 American Heart Association

86. Acute Pain Management: Scientific Evidence

factors for the development of postoperative acute persistent pain. Trends Anaesth Critical Care 4: 67–70. Shipton EA (2014b) The transition of acute postoperative pain to chronic pain: Part 2 - Limiting the transition. Trends Anaesth Critical Care 4: 71–75. Vidaeff AC, Saade GR, Belfort MA (in press) Interpreting a randomized trial report: evidence-based practice for the clinician. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. Walsh M, Woodhouse LJ, Thomas SG, Finch E (2011) Strategies aimed at preventing chronic (...) Paediatric pain assessment 412 9.3.1 Pain assessment in neonates 413 9.3.2 Observational and behavioural measures in infants and children 414 9.3.3 Self-report in children and adolescents 415 9.3.4 Children with cognitive impairment or intellectual disability 416 9.4 Analgesic agents 421 9.4.1 Paracetamol 421 9.4.2 Nonselective NSAIDs 424 9.4.3 Coxibs 429xix CONTENTS 9.4.4 Opioids and tramadol 430 9.4.5 Ketamine 438 9.4.6 Alpha-2-delta ligands (gabapentin/pregabalin) 440 9.4.7 Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists

2015 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

87. National hepatitis B testing policy

and children from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds, particularly those born in countries of intermediate and high HBV prevalence (see section 3.1, figure 1 ) • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Australia has implemented a universal vaccination program for hepatitis B to reduce the risk of transmission of HBV infection. Universal neonatal vaccination commenced in all States and Territories in May 2000. State and Territory Departments of Health operated catch-up (...) from countries with intermediate (2-7%) to high (= 8%) prevalence of HBV infection (see Figure 1). This group includes first and subsequent generations who may have been exposed through ongoing perinatal and horizontal transmission in Australia before the commencement of HBV screening during pregnancy and universal neonatal vaccination. The majority of people living with chronic hepatitis B in Australia were born overseas, particularly in the Asia Pacific region, Europe and Africa/Middle East. 1

2015 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

88. Guidelines for the treatment of malaria. Third edition

or combined with SP or artesunate; 5 | Treatment of uncomplicated P.falciparum malaria in special risk groups 50 Guidelines for the treatment of malaria 3 RD EDITIONhowever, amodiaquine use for the treatment of malaria in pregnancy has been formally documented in only > 1300 pregnancies. Use of amodiaquine in women in Ghana in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy was associated with frequent minor side- effects but not with liver toxicity, bone marrow depression or adverse neonatal outcomes (...) with falciparum malaria, although drug exposure was similar in pregnant and non-pregnant women with vivax malaria. 5 | Treatment of uncomplicated P.falciparum malaria in special risk groups 515.1.4 | LACTATING WOMEN The amounts of antimalarial drugs that enter breast milk and are consumed by breastfeeding infants are relatively small. Tetracycline is contraindicated in breastfeeding mothers because of its potential effect on infants’ bones and teeth. Pending further information on excretion in breast milk

2015 World Health Organisation Guidelines

89. Recovery: care of the child/young person

( ) ( ). Common causes of airway obstruction include: tongue ( ) laryngospasm ( ) foreign bodies such as vomit, acidic gastric contents, mucous, blood/secretions and dislodged teeth Determine the need for techniques to open the airway and the continued use/insertion of airway adjuncts until the child begins to regain consciousness: Manual techniques: chin tilt: neutral position for neonates, ‘sniffing the morning air’ for small child. jaw thrust for adolescents/adults Airway adjuncts: ( ) nasopharyngeal (...) : ( ) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) bi-phasic intermittent positive airway pressure (BIPAP) Circulation assessment Observe the clinical presentation of the child and record: ( ) Colour (central-peripheral) ( ). Temperature (core/peripheral). Babies and infants have a large surface area when compared to their volume which results in them losing heat quickly. Neonates lose heat even more rapidly as they have little subcutaneous fat to insulate them

2015 Publication 1593

90. Routine newborn assessment

Routine newborn assessment Maternity and Neonatal Clinical Guideline Great state. Great opportunity. Department of HealthQueensland Clinical Guideline: Routine newborn assessment Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 2 of 17 Document title: Routine newborn assessment (previously Examination of the newborn baby) Publication date: October 2014 Document number: MN14.4.V4.R19 Document supplement: The document supplement is integral to and should be read in conjunction (...) with this guideline. Amendments: Full version history is supplied in the document supplement. Amendment date: October 2014. Full review of original (2009) document. Replaces document: MN09.4-V3-R14 Author: Queensland Clinical Guidelines Audience: Health professionals in Queensland public and private maternity services Review date: October 2019 Endorsed by: Queensland Clinical Guidelines Steering Committee Statewide Maternity and Neonatal Clinical Network (Queensland) Contact: Email: Guidelines@health.qld.gov.au

2014 Queensland Health

91. The use of bisphosphonates in children - review of the literature guidelines for dental management

in the growing child may in?uence development of the dentition. Resorption of primary teeth roots is required for their exfoliation, and resorption of bone is critical to tooth eruption. The potential effect that bisphosphonates may have on these processes is cur- rently unknown. While various consensus guidelines and recommen- dations pertaining to the dental management of patients treated with bisphosphonates have been pub- lished, 3,5–11 none of these speci?cally address paediat- ric patients. This has (...) studies, no complications were identi- ?ed. Tooth eruption and exfoliation Bone resorption is critical to tooth eruption. For per- manent teeth, eruption requires resorption of both the roots of the deciduous predecessors, as well as bone coronal to the developing tooth. Given the action of bisphosphonates on inhibition of bone resorption, the potential for these agents to delay tooth eruption is of interest. In the rat model, delayed tooth eruption has been found following administration

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

92. Diagnosis and management of von Willebrand disease

in a obstetric unit with close collaboration between haematology, obstetric, anaesthetic and neonatal teams and access to 24-h moni- toring of FVIII-VWF (2C). ? The delivery of women with type 1 VWD can be man- aged as normal when VWF:RCo activity is >05 iu/ml by 34–36 weeks gestation (1C). ? Vaginal delivery or Caesarean section can be performed when VWF:RCo activity is maintained >05 iu/ml and platelet count maintained >503 10 9 /l (2C). ? Neuraxial anaesthesia is not recommended in women with type 2 (...) & Haemostasis, 4, 2103–2114. Sakurai, Y., Shima, M., Imai, Y., Omura, S., Kirita, T. & Yoshioka, A. (2006) Successful use of recombinant factor VIII devoid of von Wille- brand factor during multiple teeth extractions in a patient with type 3 von Willebrand disease. Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis, 17, 151–154. Sanchez-Luceros, A., Meschengieser, S.S., Mar- chese, C., Votta, R., Casais, P., Woods, A.I., Nadal, M.V., Salviu, M.J. & Lazzari, M.A. (2003) Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor changes during

2014 United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors' Organisation

93. Royal Flying Doctor Service Western Operations Clinical manual part 1.Clinical guidelines

Version 6.0 Clinical Manual Issue Date: January 2013 Part 1 - Clinical Guidelines Table of Contents 10 OBSTETRIC 1 10.1 Pre-term Labour and Tocolysis 1 10.2 Pre-Eclampsia 4 10.3 Eclampsia 6 10.4 Antepartum Haemorrhage 7 10.5 Post-Partum Haemorrhage 8 10.6 Epidurals In-Flight 10 10.7 Obstetric Trauma 11 11 PAEDIATRICS 1 11.1 Paediatric Upper Airway Obstruction 1 11.2 Gastroenteritis / Dehydration In Children 3 11.3 Neonate Retrievals 5 11.4 Intranasal Fentanyl 7 12 RESPIRATORY 1 12.1 Pulmonary Embolism (...) breaths continue with chest compressions. ? In children ALS providers should perform CPR with a ratio of 15:2 (Neonates less than a few hours old use neonate algorithm). ATTACH DEFIBRILLATOR ASAP THEN ALS ALGORITHM No No D A S R B D C RFDS Western Operations Version 6.0 Clinical Manual Issue Date: January 2013 Part 1 - Clinical Guidelines Section 1 Page 2 Life Support 1.2 Newborn Life Support Flow Chart If more than a few hours old use paediatric algorithm. Figure 2. Newborn Life Support Flow Chart

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

94. Routine newborn assessment

Routine newborn assessment Maternity and Neonatal Clinical Guideline Great state. Great opportunity. Department of HealthQueensland Clinical Guideline: Routine newborn assessment Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 2 of 17 Document title: Routine newborn assessment (previously Examination of the newborn baby) Publication date: October 2014 Document number: MN14.4.V4.R19 Document supplement: The document supplement is integral to and should be read in conjunction (...) with this guideline. Amendments: Full version history is supplied in the document supplement. Amendment date: October 2014. Full review of original (2009) document. Replaces document: MN09.4-V3-R14 Author: Queensland Clinical Guidelines Audience: Health professionals in Queensland public and private maternity services Review date: October 2019 Endorsed by: Queensland Clinical Guidelines Steering Committee Statewide Maternity and Neonatal Clinical Network (Queensland) Contact: Email: Guidelines@health.qld.gov.au

2014 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

95. Epidermolysis bullosa (EB): management of the newborn infant with EB

Epidermolysis bullosa (EB): management of the newborn infant with EB Epidermolysis bullosa (EB): management of the newborn infant with EB | Great Ormond Street Hospital Google Tag Manager Navigation Search Search You are here Epidermolysis bullosa (EB): management of the newborn infant with EB Epidermolysis bullosa (EB): management of the newborn infant with EB ). Infants with EB are nursed in their local neonatal unit (there is no need to transfer to specialised centres) and managed (...) a validated neonatal pain assessment tool to ensure adequate analgesia (opioid analgesia is usually required) given prior to wound care (avoid the administration of rectal medication if possible as this can blister the anal margin). ( ). Prepare a clean trolley with clinical waste bag, hypodermic needles, all dressings (cut to shape using supplied template) and tape cut into short lengths ( ). See below for template. Wash hands using 7 step technique using liquid soap (plain or antimicrobial) for at least

2014 Publication 1593

96. Specimen collection - microbiology and virology

bottles, the anaerobic culture bottle should be inoculated first and then the aerobic culture bottle, so that oxygen trapped in the syringe will not be transferred to the anaerobic bottle. The volume of blood is the most critical factor in the detection of blood stream infections. Place up to 4ml in the aerobic bottle (priority) and up to 10ml in the anaerobic bottle, but ensure that when using both bottles, the anaerobic bottle is inoculated first. For neonates, one to two millilitres of blood (...) is recommended ( ). However, the sensitivity of neonatal blood cultures is increased if more blood is cultured. Inoculation of the blood into the blood culture bottles should be performed first before inserting blood into other bottles as many of these bottles are not sterile and accidental contamination may occur. In children with suspected central venous line sepsis, blood for culture may be taken from a peripheral vein stab and also from (all lumen) of the intravascular lines to enable identification

2014 Publication 1593

97. Mouth care

( ). Foam cleaning sponges are ineffective at removing plaque ( ). Foam cleaning sponges are useful in the following situations: When a child has no teeth – moisten sponges with water ( ). When a child or young person has severe mucositis that prevents them from brushing their teeth – foam sponges can be moistened with water ( ). For palliative care situations when comfort is the only intended outcome. Mouth care packs should be disposed of once opened. In neonates these sponges may be too large (...) . smiling and grimacing. The tongue This is covered with stratified squamous epithelium for protection, from which project numerous papillae and taste buds on the upper surface. The tongue plays an important part in mastication (chewing), deglutition (swallowing), speech and taste ( ). The teeth Although the shape of teeth varies, the structure is the same and consists of: The crown – protrudes from the gum. The root – embedded in the bone. The interior of the tooth consists of a pulp cavity

2014 Publication 1593

98. Mouth Guard Use in the Second Stage of Labor

increases in complications in both mother and infant when pushing was prolonged, including uterine infection, postpartum hemorrhage, more extensive vaginal tearing, shoulder dystocia, 5 minute Apgar score less than 4, infant admission to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and neonatal infections. Therefore, the challenge is to consider alternative practices in order to maximize a mother's chance of a vaginal delivery and minimize these associated risks to both mother and baby. Mouth guards are used primarily (...) in contact sports, and have been demonstrated to reduce or prevent injury to the teeth. Additionally, it has been proposed that wearing a mouth guard increases the strength of different muscle groups. A recent randomized controlled pilot study including women with their first pregnancy using a dental support device (DSD) during the second stage of labor evaluated the length of the second stage and outcomes. They found a significant decrease of 38% in the length of pushing time in the group that used

2018 Clinical Trials

99. Bi-allelic POLR3A Loss-of-Function Variants Cause Autosomal-Recessive Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch Syndrome. (PubMed)

Bi-allelic POLR3A Loss-of-Function Variants Cause Autosomal-Recessive Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch Syndrome. Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (WRS), also known as neonatal progeroid syndrome, is a rare disorder of unknown etiology. It has been proposed to be autosomal-recessive and is characterized by variable clinical features, such as intrauterine growth restriction and poor postnatal weight gain, characteristic facial features (triangular appearance to the face, convex nasal profile or pinched (...) nose, and small mouth), widened fontanelles, pseudohydrocephalus, prominent scalp veins, lipodystrophy, and teeth abnormalities. A previous report described a single WRS patient with bi-allelic truncating and splicing variants in POLR3A. Here we present seven additional infants, children, and adults with WRS and bi-allelic truncating and/or splicing variants in POLR3A. POLR3A, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase III, is a DNA-directed RNA polymerase that transcribes many small noncoding RNAs

2018 American Journal of Human Genetics

100. Early-life events and developmental defects of enamel in the primary dentition. (PubMed)

Early-life events and developmental defects of enamel in the primary dentition. To investigate the occurrence of developmental defects of enamel (DDE) in the primary teeth of children aged 24-36 months and their association with early-life events.This study was undertaken with children aged 24-36 months in Pelotas, Southern Brazil. Information on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, events occurring during pregnancy and neonatal events was collected previously. In this study

2018 Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology

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