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Neonatal Sialadenitis

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1. Neonatal Sialadenitis

Neonatal Sialadenitis Neonatal Sialadenitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Neonatal Sialadenitis Neonatal (...) Sialadenitis Aka: Neonatal Sialadenitis , Newborn Parotitis , Sialoadenitis in Infants II. Epidemiology Specific type of to newborns III. Pathophysiology (most common) Pseudomonas aeruginosa catarrhalis IV. Risk Factors Oral anatomic abnormalities Dehydration Prematurity V. Signs Warm, tender single (usually parotid) VI. Labs and culture of ry duct secretions Parotid duct ( ) at upper second molar VII. Management Increase hydration Oral antibiotics VIII. Course Resolution usually within 1 week IX

2018 FP Notebook

2. Neonatal Inflammatory Submandibular Sialadenitis Associated with Prenatal Methyldopa Exposure (PubMed)

Neonatal Inflammatory Submandibular Sialadenitis Associated with Prenatal Methyldopa Exposure Inflammation of a salivary gland is an uncommon condition in the neonatal period, and an isolated form of submandibular acute inflammatory sialadenitis is an exceptionally rare phenomenon. Among various conditions that might lead to submandibular acute inflammatory sialadenitis, maternal use of drugs during pregnancy should be questioned as there may be possible associations. Herein, we describe a late

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2014 The Journal of Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics : JPPT

3. Neonatal Sialadenitis

Neonatal Sialadenitis Neonatal Sialadenitis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Neonatal Sialadenitis Neonatal (...) Sialadenitis Aka: Neonatal Sialadenitis , Newborn Parotitis , Sialoadenitis in Infants II. Epidemiology Specific type of to newborns III. Pathophysiology (most common) Pseudomonas aeruginosa catarrhalis IV. Risk Factors Oral anatomic abnormalities Dehydration Prematurity V. Signs Warm, tender single (usually parotid) VI. Labs and culture of ry duct secretions Parotid duct ( ) at upper second molar VII. Management Increase hydration Oral antibiotics VIII. Course Resolution usually within 1 week IX

2015 FP Notebook

4. Fetal distress and circulatory disturbance in monochorionic twins: Possible risk factors for sialadenitis? (PubMed)

Fetal distress and circulatory disturbance in monochorionic twins: Possible risk factors for sialadenitis? Neonatal sialadenitis is a rare condition. The vast majority of cases are caused by Staphylococcus aureus with predominant involvement of the parotid gland and need for long-term antimicrobial therapy. We reviewed three distinct cases of submandibular sialadenitis in preterm infants from monochorionic pregnancies. The association with neonatal sialadenitis is unproven. We speculate about

2015 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

5. BSR guideline Management of Adults with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome

or focal lymphocytic sialadenitis with a focus score of ⩾1 score 3 each and where abnormal ocular staining score ⩾5, Schirmer’s test result of ⩽5 mm/5 min and unstimulated salivary flow rate of <0.1 ml/min score 1 each. Investigations The best-described autoantibodies in pSS are the anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies, which are routinely identified as part of the ENA laboratory screen. About two-thirds of patients with primary SS have anti-Ro antibodies and/or anti-La antibodies. These figures, however (...) as a neuropathic disorder. Such patients may complain of a constellation of oral symptoms, including burning sensations, unusual taste as well as oral dryness, and their symptomatology is not uncommonly associated with anxiety states and clinical depression. There may also be a history of low back pain, FM and irritable bowel syndrome [ ]. A syndrome comprising histological evidence of sialadenitis, nodular osteoarthritis and xerostomia has been described [ ], but in view of the frequency of the individual

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2017 British Society for Rheumatology

6. Iodine thyroid blocking: Guidelines for use in planning and responding to radiological and nuclear emergencies

) or repeated exposure, unavoidable ingestion of contaminated food and drinking water, and where evacuation is not feasible. Neonates, pregnant and breastfeeding women and people older than 60 years, should not receive repeated ITB due to the risk of adverse effects. The following considerations should be kept in mind when administering ITB: ¦ Children, adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women, are most likely to benefit from ITB, whereas individuals over 40 years of age are less likely to benefit from (...) and moisture. Age-dependent dosage and contraindications should be on the labelling. Dosage Dosage information has remained unchanged since it was published in the 1999 WHO guidelines (see table 2). Table 2. Recommended single dosage of stable iodine according to age group (6) Age group Mass of iodine, mg Mass of KI, mg Mass of KIO 3 , mg Fraction of a tablet containing 100 mg of iodine Fraction of a tablet containing 50 mg of iodine Neonates (birth to 1 month) 12.5 16 21 1/8 1/4 Infants (1 month to 3

2017 World Health Organisation Guidelines

7. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs)

causes Caries. Periodontal disease — see the CKS topic on for more information. Tooth abscess (can restrict mouth opening) — see the CKS topic on for more information. Wisdom tooth eruption. Disorders of other facial structures Parotitis (infective or non-infective) — see the CKS topic on for more information on parotid gland swellings. Other salivary gland disorders such as inflammation (sialadenitis), infection, or obstruction (sialolithiasis) — see the CKS topic on for more information (...) the risk of dependency. Frailty and the elderly — increased falls risk; a reduced dose may be appropriate. A history of drug and/or alcohol misuse or dependency — increased risk of dependency. Do not prescribe diazepam to pregnant women unless unavoidable (for example, for seizure control) — risk of neonatal withdrawal symptoms. Do not prescribe diazepam to breastfeeding women if possible — diazepam is excreted in breast milk with the potential to cause infant sedation. [ ; ] Drug interactions Drug

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

8. Hypertension in pregnancy

interval of more than 10 years. Body mass index (BMI) of 35 kg/m 2 or greater at the first visit. Family history of pre-eclampsia. Multiple pregnancy. [ ] Prognosis What is the prognosis? Prognosis for current pregnancy Chronic hypertension Most women with pre-existing mild to moderate hypertension, with a blood pressure less than 160/110 mmHg, will have good maternal and neonatal outcomes [ ]. Overall rates of pre-eclampsia in women with pre-existing hypertension (not classified by severity) have been (...) , and hepatic failure/necrosis [ ]. Fetal/neonatal complications include placental abruption, IUGR, premature delivery, intrauterine fetal death, and neonatal death [ ]. Long-term health implications Long-term health implications Gestational hypertension It is currently unclear whether women with previous gestational hypertension are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes. A large meta-analysis showed that women previously diagnosed with pre-eclampsia were not at significantly increased risk

2015 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

9. Viral Infections of the Mouth (Diagnosis)

as cytomegalovirus. Primary HHV-5 infection is usually asymptomatic in patients who are immunocompetent. The virus is shed by glandular secretions, including saliva. It occasionally is shed in urine. Primary HHV-5 infection can be asymptomatic, but it can also mimic mononucleosis. Clinical disease is more common in neonates and in patients who are immunosuppressed than in other individuals. HHV-5 can persist indefinitely in the host. Reactivation of latent infection can occur in patients who are immunosuppressed

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Viral Infections of the Mouth (Treatment)

as cytomegalovirus. Primary HHV-5 infection is usually asymptomatic in patients who are immunocompetent. The virus is shed by glandular secretions, including saliva. It occasionally is shed in urine. Primary HHV-5 infection can be asymptomatic, but it can also mimic mononucleosis. Clinical disease is more common in neonates and in patients who are immunosuppressed than in other individuals. HHV-5 can persist indefinitely in the host. Reactivation of latent infection can occur in patients who are immunosuppressed

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Sjogren Syndrome (Overview)

a health risk. They were accepted by the ACR as a provisional criteria set in 2012. [ ] According to the ACR criteria, the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome requires at least two of the following three findings: Positive serum anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies or positive rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody titer of at least 1:320 Ocular staining score of at least 3 Presence of focal lymphocytic sialadenitis with a focus score of at least 1 focus/4 mm 2 in labial salivary gland biopsy samples (...) with antiRo/SS-A antidodies are at risk for fetal loss, complete heart block in the fetus ,and neonatal lupus syndrome in the newborn Emergence of pseudolymphomas (pleomorphic cells that do not meet the criteria for malignancy) and (see the image below) [ ] Clinical photograph and photomicrograph of a 48-year-old man with Sjögren syndrome with a large left parotid mass. On biopsy, B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type was identified. Microscopic section of parotid biopsy

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Sjogren Syndrome (Overview)

a health risk. They were accepted by the ACR as a provisional criteria set in 2012. [ ] According to the ACR criteria, the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome requires at least two of the following three findings: Positive serum anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies or positive rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody titer of at least 1:320 Ocular staining score of at least 3 Presence of focal lymphocytic sialadenitis with a focus score of at least 1 focus/4 mm 2 in labial salivary gland biopsy samples (...) with antiRo/SS-A antidodies are at risk for fetal loss, complete heart block in the fetus ,and neonatal lupus syndrome in the newborn Emergence of pseudolymphomas (pleomorphic cells that do not meet the criteria for malignancy) and (see the image below) [ ] Clinical photograph and photomicrograph of a 48-year-old man with Sjögren syndrome with a large left parotid mass. On biopsy, B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type was identified. Microscopic section of parotid biopsy

2014 eMedicine.com

13. Hepatitis, Viral (Overview)

with the age at the time of infection. Chronic hepatitis B infection develops in up to 90% of individuals infected as neonates; however only 1-5% of individuals infected with HBV as adults develop chronic hepatitis B infection. [ ] Chronic hepatitis C infection develops in 75-85% of patients infected with hepatitis C. [ ] Individuals infected with HCV at a younger age are less likely to develop chronic hepatitis C infection. [ ] Some patients with chronic hepatitis remain asymptomatic for their entire (...) surface antigen (HBsAg)—that is, anti-HBs—clear HBsAg (and HBV virions), and fully recover. About 5% of adult patients, 90% of infected infants, and 30-50% of children infected at age 1-5 years develop chronic infection. [ ] Some patients, particularly individuals who are infected as neonates or as young children, have elevated serum levels of HBV DNA and a positive blood test for the presence of HBeAg but have normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and show minimal histologic evidence of liver

2014 eMedicine.com

14. Viral Infections of the Mouth (Overview)

as cytomegalovirus. Primary HHV-5 infection is usually asymptomatic in patients who are immunocompetent. The virus is shed by glandular secretions, including saliva. It occasionally is shed in urine. Primary HHV-5 infection can be asymptomatic, but it can also mimic mononucleosis. Clinical disease is more common in neonates and in patients who are immunosuppressed than in other individuals. HHV-5 can persist indefinitely in the host. Reactivation of latent infection can occur in patients who are immunosuppressed

2014 eMedicine.com

15. Mucocele and Ranula (Treatment)

with superficial mucoceles, unless the lesions are surgically excised. Complications are more common with surgical intervention in oral and cervical ranulas than other treatments. Possible surgical complications include the following: injury to the Wharton duct, leading to stenosis, obstructive sialadenitis, and leakage of saliva; injury to the lingual nerve with temporary or permanent paresthesia; and injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve with paresthesia. Postoperative hematoma (...) hygroma. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol . 2003 Apr. 24(4):757-61. . Osborne TE, Haller JA, Levin LS, Little BJ, King KE. Submandibular cystic hygroma resembling a plunging ranula in a neonate. Review and report of a case. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol . 1991 Jan. 71(1):16-20. . Ali MK, Chiancone G, Knox GW. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in a plunging ranula. J Oral Maxillofac Surg . 1990 Mar. 48(3):305-8. . La'porte SJ, Juttla JK, Lingam RK. Imaging the floor of the mouth and the sublingual space

2014 eMedicine.com

16. Mucocele and Ranula (Follow-up)

with superficial mucoceles, unless the lesions are surgically excised. Complications are more common with surgical intervention in oral and cervical ranulas than other treatments. Possible surgical complications include the following: injury to the Wharton duct, leading to stenosis, obstructive sialadenitis, and leakage of saliva; injury to the lingual nerve with temporary or permanent paresthesia; and injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve with paresthesia. Postoperative hematoma (...) hygroma. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol . 2003 Apr. 24(4):757-61. . Osborne TE, Haller JA, Levin LS, Little BJ, King KE. Submandibular cystic hygroma resembling a plunging ranula in a neonate. Review and report of a case. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol . 1991 Jan. 71(1):16-20. . Ali MK, Chiancone G, Knox GW. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in a plunging ranula. J Oral Maxillofac Surg . 1990 Mar. 48(3):305-8. . La'porte SJ, Juttla JK, Lingam RK. Imaging the floor of the mouth and the sublingual space

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Viral Infections of the Mouth (Follow-up)

as cytomegalovirus. Primary HHV-5 infection is usually asymptomatic in patients who are immunocompetent. The virus is shed by glandular secretions, including saliva. It occasionally is shed in urine. Primary HHV-5 infection can be asymptomatic, but it can also mimic mononucleosis. Clinical disease is more common in neonates and in patients who are immunosuppressed than in other individuals. HHV-5 can persist indefinitely in the host. Reactivation of latent infection can occur in patients who are immunosuppressed

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Hepatitis, Viral (Diagnosis)

with the age at the time of infection. Chronic hepatitis B infection develops in up to 90% of individuals infected as neonates; however only 1-5% of individuals infected with HBV as adults develop chronic hepatitis B infection. [ ] Chronic hepatitis C infection develops in 75-85% of patients infected with hepatitis C. [ ] Individuals infected with HCV at a younger age are less likely to develop chronic hepatitis C infection. [ ] Some patients with chronic hepatitis remain asymptomatic for their entire (...) surface antigen (HBsAg)—that is, anti-HBs—clear HBsAg (and HBV virions), and fully recover. About 5% of adult patients, 90% of infected infants, and 30-50% of children infected at age 1-5 years develop chronic infection. [ ] Some patients, particularly individuals who are infected as neonates or as young children, have elevated serum levels of HBV DNA and a positive blood test for the presence of HBeAg but have normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and show minimal histologic evidence of liver

2014 eMedicine.com

19. Parotitis

to ascending infection. Many psychotropic drugs are relatives of antihistamines. Acute parotitis in neonates This rare form of parotitis is lethal without treatment. In January 2004, Spiegel et al reviewed the literature and stated that only 32 cases had been reported in journals during the previous 3 decades. [ ] The characteristic clinical picture was of a sick premature infant with unilateral parotid swelling and inflammation. Seventy-five percent of the cases were in male infants. Pus expressed from (...) with or without injection of contrast media into the duct. CT scans also show single or multiple stones. (A retrospective study by Jáurequi et al suggested that it is uncommon to find multiple parotid calcifications in chronic parotitis, with the investigators reporting more than one calcification in the parotid gland region in just 13 out of 133 patients (10%) following parotid sialendoscopy for chronic sialadenitis. [ ] ) Treatment is removal of the stone. Massage of the gland from posterior to anterior may

2014 eMedicine Surgery

20. Hepatitis (Overview)

with the age at the time of infection. Chronic hepatitis B infection develops in up to 90% of individuals infected as neonates; however only 1-5% of individuals infected with HBV as adults develop chronic hepatitis B infection. [ ] Chronic hepatitis C infection develops in 75-85% of patients infected with hepatitis C. [ ] Individuals infected with HCV at a younger age are less likely to develop chronic hepatitis C infection. [ ] Some patients with chronic hepatitis remain asymptomatic for their entire (...) surface antigen (HBsAg)—that is, anti-HBs—clear HBsAg (and HBV virions), and fully recover. About 5% of adult patients, 90% of infected infants, and 30-50% of children infected at age 1-5 years develop chronic infection. [ ] Some patients, particularly individuals who are infected as neonates or as young children, have elevated serum levels of HBV DNA and a positive blood test for the presence of HBeAg but have normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and show minimal histologic evidence of liver

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

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