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Narcotic Analgesic

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1. Case control: Use of narcotic analgesics associated with increased falls and fractures in elderly patients with osteoarthritis

Case control: Use of narcotic analgesics associated with increased falls and fractures in elderly patients with osteoarthritis Use of narcotic analgesics associated with increased falls and fractures in elderly patients with osteoarthritis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Use of narcotic analgesics associated with increased falls and fractures in elderly patients with osteoarthritis Article Text Aetiology Case control Use

2014 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

2. Minimizing Narcotic Analgesics After Endocrine Surgery

Minimizing Narcotic Analgesics After Endocrine Surgery Minimizing Narcotic Analgesics After Endocrine Surgery - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Minimizing Narcotic Analgesics After Endocrine (...) approximately 2 minutes each day to complete. Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 126 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Intervention Model Description: option 1: Tylenol (also known as acetaminophen) with tramadol if needed, or option 2: Tylenol #3 as needed Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Supportive Care Official Title: Minimizing Narcotic Analgesics After Thyroid

2018 Clinical Trials

3. The efficacy of non-narcotic analgesics on postoperative endodontic pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis. (PubMed)

The efficacy of non-narcotic analgesics on postoperative endodontic pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis. The objective of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of non-narcotic analgesics including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and/or paracetamol in the treatment of post-operative endodontic pain. Additionally, we aimed to examine the possible association of study covariates on the pain scores using meta-regression analysis. An electronic search was performed in 2016 (...) . After data extraction and quality assessment of the included studies (n = 27, representing 2188 patients), meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect inverse variance method. Meta-regression analysis was conducted to examine the associations between effect sizes and study-level covariates (P < 0·05). The results showed that administration of non-narcotic analgesic was more effective than placebo in the management of post-operative pain, resulting in a lower pain scores with a standardised

2017 Journal of oral rehabilitation

4. [Management and improvement in cancer pain: focusing on narcotic analgesics]

[Management and improvement in cancer pain: focusing on narcotic analgesics] [Management and improvement in cancer pain: focusing on narcotic analgesics] [Management and improvement in cancer pain: focusing on narcotic analgesics] Hyun M, Chung Y, Lee J, Sim J, Kang M, Kim B, Ko S Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Hyun M (...) , Chung Y, Lee J, Sim J, Kang M, Kim B, Ko S. [Management and improvement in cancer pain: focusing on narcotic analgesics] Seoul: National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency (NECA). NECA-A-12-004. 2012 Authors' conclusions This study aimed to provide the rationale for policy setting by conducting the following studies, and referring to the framework in the Evidence-Practice gaps report by the Australian National Institute of Clinical Studies (NICS). First, the status of cancer pain

2012 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

5. Identification of A3 adenosine receptor agonists as novel non‐narcotic analgesics (PubMed)

Identification of A3 adenosine receptor agonists as novel non‐narcotic analgesics Chronic pain negatively impacts the quality of life in a variety of patient populations. The current therapeutic repertoire is inadequate in managing patient pain and warrants the development of new therapeutics. Adenosine and its four cognate receptors (A1 , A2A , A2B and A3 ) have important roles in physiological and pathophysiological states, including chronic pain. Preclinical and clinical studies have

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2016 British journal of pharmacology

6. Narcotic Analgesic

Narcotic Analgesic Narcotic Analgesic Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Narcotic Analgesic Narcotic Analgesic Aka (...) : Narcotic Analgesic , Opioid Analgesic , Narcotic , Opioid , Opiate , Opioid Abuse Deterrent Agent , Opioid Metabolism From Related Chapters II. Definitions Opiate Naturally occurring, derived from opium poppy Examples: , , Opioids Includes Opiates (naturally occurring) Semi-synthetic Opioids (structurally similar to Opiates) Examples: , , , Oxymorphone Synthetic Opioids Examples: , , , , III. Adverse Effects See See See See IV. Pharmacology: Metabolism of Opioids Common Metabolites : Metabolizes

2018 FP Notebook

7. Narcotic Versus Non-narcotic Medication for Pain Management After Wrist/Hand Fractures

provides the most effective pain relief Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Distal Radius Fracture Pain Management Metacarpal Fracture Drug: Hydrocodone 5Mg/Acetaminophen 500Mg Tab Drug: Acetaminophen 500Mg Tab Drug: Ibuprofen 600 mg tab Phase 4 Detailed Description: The purposes of this noninferiority randomized clinical trial are to determine whether: 1. the most commonly used non-narcotic analgesic (ibuprofen 600 mg + acetaminophen 500 mg) provides pain relief that is not unacceptably (...) Fractures, Bone Radius Fractures Wounds and Injuries Forearm Injuries Arm Injuries Acetaminophen Ibuprofen Hydrocodone Narcotics Analgesics, Non-Narcotic Analgesics Sensory System Agents Peripheral Nervous System Agents Physiological Effects of Drugs Antipyretics Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents Antirheumatic Agents Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors Enzyme Inhibitors Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action Analgesics, Opioid Central Nervous System Depressants Antitussive

2017 Clinical Trials

8. Narcotic vs. Non-narcotic Pain Regimens After Pediatric Appendectomy

Acetaminophen Central Nervous System Depressants Physiological Effects of Drugs Analgesics Sensory System Agents Peripheral Nervous System Agents Analgesics, Non-Narcotic Antipyretics (...) Narcotic vs. Non-narcotic Pain Regimens After Pediatric Appendectomy Narcotic vs. Non-narcotic Pain Regimens After Pediatric Appendectomy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Narcotic vs. Non

2017 Clinical Trials

9. Comparative Effectiveness of Analgesics To Reduce Acute Pain in the Prehospital Setting

Comparative Effectiveness of Analgesics To Reduce Acute Pain in the Prehospital Setting Comparative Effectiveness of Analgesics To Reduce Acute Pain in the Prehospital Setting Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 220 R Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 220 Comparative Effectiveness of Analgesics To Reduce Acute Pain in the Prehospital Setting Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 (...) analgesics as treatment of moderate to severe acute pain in the prehospital setting. Key Messages • As initial therapy in the prehospital setting: o Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs provide similar pain relief to opioids and may cause fewer overall side effects and less drowsiness. o Acetaminophen may provide similar pain relief to opioids, and may cause fewer side effects overall and less dizziness. o Ketamine may provide similar pain relief to opioids. Ketamine may cause more dizziness or overall

2019 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

10. Narcotics, Benzodiazepines, Stimulants, and Gabapentin: Policies, Initiatives, and Practices Across Canada, 2014

Narcotics, Benzodiazepines, Stimulants, and Gabapentin: Policies, Initiatives, and Practices Across Canada, 2014 Narcotics, Benzodiazepines, Stimulants, and Gabapentin: Policies, Initiatives, and Practices Across Canada, 2014 | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Narcotics, Benzodiazepines, Stimulants, and Gabapentin: Policies, Initiatives, and Practices Across Canada, 2014 Narcotics, Benzodiazepines, Stimulants, and Gabapentin: Policies, Initiatives, and Practices Across Canada, 2014 (...) , as well as place a significant burden on our health, social services, and public safety systems.” 1 The purpose of this Environmental Scan is to provide an overview of policies, practices, and initiatives which the publicly funded drug programs, colleges of physicians and surgeons, and colleges of pharmacy are implementing across Canada to address the misuse, abuse, and diversion of prescription narcotics (opioids), benzodiazepines, stimulants, and gabapentin. This information may assist drug policy

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Environmental Scanning

11. Opioids and analgesics use after adult spinal deformity surgery correlates with sagittal alignment and preoperative analgesic pattern. (PubMed)

Opioids and analgesics use after adult spinal deformity surgery correlates with sagittal alignment and preoperative analgesic pattern. To assess pain, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scores and sagittal parameters of adult spinal deformity (ASD)-operated patients in the context of their analgesic consumption especially opioids (narcotics) over the first year postoperative period.In total, 372 patients from a multicenter database were stratified into 3 groups at baseline: 241 patients (...) in the minimal group (no analgesic, or NSAIDs/narcotics weekly or less), 64 in the NSAIDs every day group and 67 in the narcotics every day group. HRQOL and back and leg pain scores were evaluated at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Also several sagittal alignment parameters were assessed.Significant improvements in pain and HRQOL scores were observed across all 3 groups by 1 year (P < 0.05) postoperatively. While the minimal group had the best pre- and postoperative HRQOL scores, the NSAID group

2019 European Spine Journal

12. Does Pre-Emptive Administration of Intravenous Ibuprofen (Caldolor) or Intravenous Acetaminophen (Ofirmev) Reduce Postoperative Pain and Subsequent Narcotic Consumption After Third Molar Surgery? (PubMed)

variable was the amount of postoperative analgesic (narcotic and over-the-counter) medication taken in both groups. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare groups in terms of outcomes, the χ2 test was used to assess associations between nominal variables, and Spearman correlations were used to assess associations between continuous variables. Significance was set at P < .05.The study sample consisted of 58 patients (39 female and 19 male patients). A total of 41 patients (IV ibuprofen, n = 19; IV (...) Does Pre-Emptive Administration of Intravenous Ibuprofen (Caldolor) or Intravenous Acetaminophen (Ofirmev) Reduce Postoperative Pain and Subsequent Narcotic Consumption After Third Molar Surgery? Pre-emptive analgesia is known to reduce postoperative pain after third molar removal. The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative pain in patients receiving either preoperative intravenous (IV) ibuprofen or preoperative IV acetaminophen for third molar surgery.This study was a randomized

2019 Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

13. Parents' attitudes toward post-operative narcotic use in pediatric patients. (PubMed)

Parents' attitudes toward post-operative narcotic use in pediatric patients. To understand parent perceptions of post-operative narcotic use in the pediatric otolaryngology patient population.This was a descriptive survey of caregivers on children being seen in a university pediatric otolaryngology clinic. Caregiver role, age of child, previous exposure to analgesics, choice of analgesics, comfort and concern with narcotic use in this child, knowledge of narcotic side effects, and knowledge (...) about narcotic disposal were included. Comfort and concern questions were scored on a 10-point VAS where the higher numbers indicated more concern/discomfort.301 caregivers participated, 84.5% were mothers, 11% were fathers and the rest were custodial grandparents. 45.2% knew someone addicted to narcotics. Respondents were uncomfortable with their child experiencing pain in a hypothetical postoperative situation, with 63.9% having at least some discomfort with it. First choice of medication to treat

2019 International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

14. Association of Perioperative Opioid-Sparing Multimodal Analgesia With Narcotic Use and Pain Control After Head and Neck Free Flap Reconstruction. (PubMed)

and improved pain control compared with traditional narcotic-based analgesics at discharge and in the immediate postoperative period after free flap reconstructive surgery.This retrospective cohort study assessed a consecutive sample of 65 patients (28 MMA, 37 controls) undergoing free flap reconstruction of a through-and-through mucosal defect within the head and neck region at a tertiary academic referral center from June 1, 2017, to November 30, 2018. Patients and physicians were not blinded (...) to the patients' analgesic regimen. Patients' clinical courses were followed up for 30 days postoperatively.Patients were administered a preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative analgesia regimen consisting of scheduled and as-needed neuromodulating and anti-inflammatory medications, with narcotic medications reserved for refractory cases. Control patients were administered traditional narcotic-based analgesics as needed.Narcotic doses administered during the perioperative period and at discharge were

2019 JAMA facial plastic surgery

15. The Standardization of Outpatient Procedure (STOP) Narcotics: A Prospective Health Systems Intervention to Reduce Opioid Use in Ambulatory Breast Surgery. (PubMed)

The Standardization of Outpatient Procedure (STOP) Narcotics: A Prospective Health Systems Intervention to Reduce Opioid Use in Ambulatory Breast Surgery. During the past 15 years, opioid-related overdose death rates for women have increased 471%. Many surgeons provide opioid prescriptions well in excess of what patients actually use. This study assessed a health systems intervention to control pain adequately while reducing opioid prescriptions in ambulatory breast surgery.This prospective non (...) -inferiority study included women 18-75 years of age undergoing elective ambulatory general surgical breast procedures. Pre- and postintervention groups were compared, separated by implementation of a multi-pronged, opioid-sparing strategy consisting of patient education, health care provider education and perioperative multimodal analgesic strategies. The primary outcome was average pain during the first 7 postoperative days on a numeric rating scale of 0-10. The secondary outcomes included medication use

2019 Annals of Surgical Oncology

16. Narcotic Free Cervical Endocrine Surgery: A Shift in Paradigm. (PubMed)

narcotic medication at discharge, and no patient called after discharge to request analgesic medications. Compared with our prior treatment paradigm, we achieved a 96.6% reduction in the number of narcotic tablets prescribed, and a 98% reduction in unconsumed tablets. Univariate analysis suggested history of substance abuse (P < 0.001), anxiety (P = 0.01), depression (P < 0.001), baseline narcotic use (P = 0.004), highest pain postoperatively (P = 0.004), and incision length (P = 0.007) as predictive (...) Narcotic Free Cervical Endocrine Surgery: A Shift in Paradigm. The opioid epidemic has stimulated initiatives to reduce the number of unnecessary narcotic prescriptions. We adopted an opt-in prescription system for patients undergoing ambulatory cervical endocrine surgery (CES). We hypothesized that empowering patients to decide whether or not to receive narcotics for pain control would result in fewer unnecessary opioid prescriptions.We enrolled all patients scheduled for outpatient CES

2019 Annals of Surgery

17. Perioperative Effects of Different Narcotic Analgesics Used to Improve Effectiveness of Total Intravenous Anaesthesia (PubMed)

Perioperative Effects of Different Narcotic Analgesics Used to Improve Effectiveness of Total Intravenous Anaesthesia We aimed to evaluate the depth of anaesthesia, perioperative haemodynamics, postoperative pain scores, analgesic consumption in patients receiving remifentanil- or alfentanil-based total intravenous anaesthesia for single-level lumbar discectomy.Seventy patients undergoing discectomy were enrolled in the study. Patients were intravenously administered an initial bolus dose of 2 (...) analgesic consumption and requirement for additional analgesics were significantly high in the remifentanil group. After the first hour, the pain scores were not significantly different. Mean arterial blood pressure was significantly low at 45 and 60 min preoperatively in the remifentanil group. In the remifentanil group, heart rate at 15, 30, 45, 60 min were significantly lower than those in the alfentanil group. BIS values of the two groups were not significantly different at any measurement time

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2016 Turkish journal of anaesthesiology and reanimation

18. Nonopioid, Over-the-Counter Analgesics Can Be as or More Effective Than Prescription Medications Containing Opioids in the Pain Management of Post-Extraction Patients

consistent with basic biological, physical and/or behavioral science principles, laws and research?) by Kylie S. Barroso (Austin, Texas) on 07/07/2017 Ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and is absorbed by the GI tract. This drug is used to stop the synthesis of prostaglandins, which are responsible for the inflammatory response to tissue injury through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoenzymes. Codeine is a narcotic analgesic drug that is absorbed via GI tract if taken orally (...) Nonopioid, Over-the-Counter Analgesics Can Be as or More Effective Than Prescription Medications Containing Opioids in the Pain Management of Post-Extraction Patients UTCAT3212, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Nonopioid, Over-the-Counter Analgesics Can Be as or More Effective Than Prescription Medications Containing Opioids in the Pain Management of Post-Extraction Patients Clinical Question For a post

2017 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

19. [Ketoprophen and nefopam combination for postoperative analgesia with minimal use of narcotic analgesics in cardio-surgical patients]. (PubMed)

[Ketoprophen and nefopam combination for postoperative analgesia with minimal use of narcotic analgesics in cardio-surgical patients]. 4 combinations of analgesia were studied: 1) Nefopam and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with Trimeperidine; 2) Ketoprofen (100 microg each 12 hours intramuscular) and PCA with Trimeperidine; 3) Nefopam, Ketoprofen and PCA with Trimeperidine; 4) PCA with Trimeperidine as monotherapy in early postoperative period in cardio-surgical patients. 80 patients (age (...) from 40 to 70) were divided into 4 groups, 20 patients in each group. Administration of Nefopam and Ketoprofen before extubation reduced the intensity of pain syndrome (in average on 90%) and promoted the early stirring up of patients. Combination of Nefopam and Ketoprofen provided the most expressed analgesic and opioids-saving effects. In this group average amount of Trimeperidine per 24 hours was 14.7 microg that was 4.9 times less than in group of PCA with Trimeperidine as monotherapy. Dynamics

2014 Anesteziologiia i reanimatologiia

20. Narcotics vs NSAIDs for Post-operative Analgesia in Outpatient Rhinoplasty

from the U.S.: No Additional relevant MeSH terms: Layout table for MeSH terms Narcotics Central Nervous System Depressants Physiological Effects of Drugs Analgesics Sensory System Agents Peripheral Nervous System Agents (...) Narcotics vs NSAIDs for Post-operative Analgesia in Outpatient Rhinoplasty Narcotics vs NSAIDs for Post-operative Analgesia in Outpatient Rhinoplasty - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more

2018 Clinical Trials

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