How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

127 results for

Nail Splinter Hemorrhage

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

81. Drug Eruptions (Diagnosis)

the images below. Paronychia. Papules and annular plaques. Superficial and mid-dermal perivascular infiltrate of lymphocytes and eosinophils. Foci of extravasation of erythrocytes. Sorafenib [ ] (a novel multikinase inhibitor) - Hand-foot skin reaction, facial and scalp eruption, scalp dysesthesia, subungual splinter hemorrhages, alopecia, body hair loss, stomatitis, nipple hyperkeratosis or pain, and eruptive facial cysts Vemurafenib is a systemic medication recently approved by the Food and Drug (...) of accumulation is argyria (blue-gray discoloration of skin and nails) observed with use of silver nitrate nasal sprays. Adverse effects are normal but unwanted effects of a drug. For example, antimetabolite chemotherapeutic agents, such as cyclophosphamide, are associated with hair loss. The direct release of mast cell mediators is a dose-dependent phenomenon that does not involve antibodies. For example, aspirin and other NSAIDs cause a shift in leukotriene production, which triggers the release

2014 eMedicine.com

82. Dermatologic Manifestations of Hematologic Disease (Diagnosis)

, purpura, ecchymoses, painful skin nodules, and subungual splinter hemorrhages. Livedo reticularis is a presenting sign in up to 40% of patients with the diagnosis of SLE. [ ] Skin changes defined as livedo reticularis are violaceous, red or blue, reticular, or mottled pattern of the skin of the arms, legs, and the trunk. They are not reversible with rewarming. [ ] Noninflammatory vascular thrombosis is the most frequent finding in skin lesions of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. Differential (...) is believed to diminish disulfide bond formation, which consequently reduces nail-plate pliability. Changes also occur in the oral mucosa and on the tongue. Of 378 patients with iron deficiency, 14% had angular stomatitis and almost half had alterations in tongue papillae, either a change to the filiform type or atrophy. [ , ] Diffuse hair thinning is reported in female blood donors and is believed to be caused by a decrease in the iron storage pool. Changes in hair quality, primarily increased splitting

2014 eMedicine.com

83. Dermatologic Manifestations of Cardiac Disease (Diagnosis)

of clubbing of a finger in a patient with Eisenmenger syndrome (right-to-left shunt). Cyanosis Definition is a bluish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes due to an increased amount of reduced hemoglobin in the small blood vessels of the skin. It is most appreciable in the lips, nail beds, earlobes, and cheeks. The mechanism includes either dilatation of cutaneous venules or a reduction in the oxygen saturation of intracapillary blood. Cyanosis manifests when the absolute concentration (...) of reduced hemoglobin exceeds 5 g/dL. Clinical presentation Cyanosis may be central or peripheral. In the central type, the desaturation of the arterial blood affects both the mucous membranes and the skin. In peripheral cyanosis, a slowing of blood flow and overextraction of oxygen from blood occurs as a result of vasoconstriction and reduced peripheral blood flow owing to cold exposure, shock, congestive heart failure (CHF), or peripheral vascular disease. Central cyanosis is caused by the following

2014 eMedicine.com

84. Dermatologic Manifestations of Gastrointestinal Disease (Diagnosis)

macular or papular, sharply demarcated telangiectases on the face, lips, palate, tongue, ears, chest, or extremities, with occasional presentation under nails. The age of onset for the telangiectases is most often the third decade of life, although earlier presentations may occur during adolescence. Although the distribution of lesions and associated bleeding diathesis are clinically suggestive of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, it may occasionally be difficult to distinguish from similar (...) % of patients. The second most common manifestation involves spontaneous hemorrhage from vascular telangiectasia within the GI tract. [ , ] The GI lesions resemble the skin lesions in form and size and are most often found in the stomach or duodenum. A ring of less vascularized tissue surrounding the GI lesions is a characteristic finding on endoscopy. Bleeding from these telangiectases tends to begin in the fifth or sixth decade of life and often can be severe. Treatment modalities include endoscopic laser

2014 eMedicine.com

85. Foreign Body Removal, Wound

the retrieval process Poor or inadequate information on the position of the foreign body, leading to further exploration in the operating room Inadequate hemostasis or the potential for severe bleeding, especially if the patient has a clotting or bleeding disorder Cosmetic deformity related to the process of removal Ling et al, in a retrospective study of 87 patients with foreign body injuries due to nail gun accident, described other factors that suggest the need for a referral, and these included osseous (...) and at the bases of fingers or toes are useful anesthetic application options to consider prior to an extensive evaluation or removal attempt. Removal of a nail through the hand or foot is aided by blocking the relevant nerve distributions prior to an attempt. [ , ] Field blocks that surround the site of a splinter or staple entrance are essential for pain management during the procedure. A digital nerve block facilitates the removal of a fishhook through a finger and also helps in postprocedure pain

2014 eMedicine.com

86. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome (Follow-up)

. The purplish hue is from stasis in the small vessel beds. Muddy discoloration and mild diffuse swelling of the fingers observed as part of the Raynaud phenomenon, which is associated with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. At room temperature, this patient still has decreased capillary refill and cold fingers despite treatment with pentoxifylline. The discoloration extends proximally onto the palms and turns blue-purple when exposed to cold. Linear splinter hemorrhages are found under the nails of fingers (...) , heparin, or low molecular weight (LMW) heparin [ , , ] Warfarin sensitivity is conferred by the presence of a cytochrome oxidase P-450 mutation (CYP2C9) and can be associated with severe bleeding (*3 isoleucine to leucine in 10% of Caucasians; *4 asparagine to glutamine in 3% of African Americans). The presence of an antiphospholipid antibody accentuates the prothrombotic state that exists when warfarin is withdrawn (because of low protein C synthesis and the presence of plasminogen activator

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

87. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome (Diagnosis)

-purple when exposed to cold. Linear splinter hemorrhages are found under the nails of fingers and toes. These may be solitary or multiple and appear intermittently. One set of suggested algorithms for the workup and treatment of patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. This should not be considered dogmatic because laboratory evaluation is not standardized and treatment remains empiric and controversial. Laboratory testing is not recommended in healthy asymptomatic individuals with no risk (...) == processing > Pediatric Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Updated: Dec 11, 2018 Author: Barry L Myones, MD; Chief Editor: Lawrence K Jung, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Pediatric Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Overview Background Antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies have been found in association with clinical symptoms such as deep venous thrombosis, arterial occlusive events (eg, stroke, ), and recurrent fetal loss. They are also associated with vasospastic phenomena

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

88. Endocarditis (Diagnosis)

of IE are found in as many as 50% of patients. They include the following: Petechiae: Common, but nonspecific, finding Subungual (splinter) hemorrhages: Dark-red, linear lesions in the nail beds Osler nodes: Tender subcutaneous nodules usually found on the distal pads of the digits Janeway lesions: Nontender maculae on the palms and soles Roth spots: Retinal hemorrhages with small, clear centers; rare Signs of neurologic disease, which occur in as many as 40% of patients, include the following (...) , septic pulmonary infarcts, mycotic aneurysm, intracranial hemorrhage, conjunctival hemorrhage, or Janeway lesions Immunologic phenomenon such as glomerulonephritis, Osler nodes, Roth spots, and rheumatoid factor Positive blood culture results not meeting major criteria or serologic evidence of active infection with an organism consistent with IE Echocardiogram results consistent with IE but not meeting major echocardiographic criteria A definitive clinical diagnosis can be made based on the following

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

89. Tetanus (Diagnosis)

of neurotransmitter containing vesicles to the cell membrane. As a result, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing and glycine-containing vesicles are not released, and there is a loss of inhibitory action on motor and autonomic neurons. [ ] With this loss of central inhibition, there is autonomic hyperactivity as well as uncontrolled muscle contractions (spasms) in response to normal stimuli such as noises or lights. Once the toxin becomes fixed to neurons, it cannot be neutralized with antitoxin. Recovery (...) of nerve function from tetanus toxins requires sprouting of new nerve terminals and formation of new synapses. Localized tetanus develops when only the nerves supplying the affected muscle are involved. Generalized tetanus develops when the toxin released at the wound spreads through the lymphatics and blood to multiple nerve terminals. The blood-brain barrier prevents direct entry of toxin to the CNS. Previous Next: Etiology Tetanus spores may survive for years in some environments and are resistant

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

90. Tetanus (Overview)

of neurotransmitter containing vesicles to the cell membrane. As a result, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing and glycine-containing vesicles are not released, and there is a loss of inhibitory action on motor and autonomic neurons. [ ] With this loss of central inhibition, there is autonomic hyperactivity as well as uncontrolled muscle contractions (spasms) in response to normal stimuli such as noises or lights. Once the toxin becomes fixed to neurons, it cannot be neutralized with antitoxin. Recovery (...) of nerve function from tetanus toxins requires sprouting of new nerve terminals and formation of new synapses. Localized tetanus develops when only the nerves supplying the affected muscle are involved. Generalized tetanus develops when the toxin released at the wound spreads through the lymphatics and blood to multiple nerve terminals. The blood-brain barrier prevents direct entry of toxin to the CNS. Previous Next: Etiology Tetanus spores may survive for years in some environments and are resistant

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

91. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome (Overview)

-purple when exposed to cold. Linear splinter hemorrhages are found under the nails of fingers and toes. These may be solitary or multiple and appear intermittently. One set of suggested algorithms for the workup and treatment of patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. This should not be considered dogmatic because laboratory evaluation is not standardized and treatment remains empiric and controversial. Laboratory testing is not recommended in healthy asymptomatic individuals with no risk (...) == processing > Pediatric Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Updated: Dec 11, 2018 Author: Barry L Myones, MD; Chief Editor: Lawrence K Jung, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Pediatric Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Overview Background Antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies have been found in association with clinical symptoms such as deep venous thrombosis, arterial occlusive events (eg, stroke, ), and recurrent fetal loss. They are also associated with vasospastic phenomena

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

92. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome (Treatment)

antibody syndrome. At room temperature, this patient still has decreased capillary refill and cold fingers despite treatment with pentoxifylline. The discoloration extends proximally onto the palms and turns blue-purple when exposed to cold. Linear splinter hemorrhages are found under the nails of fingers and toes. These may be solitary or multiple and appear intermittently. One set of suggested algorithms for the workup and treatment of patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. This should (...) : In healthy patients who are asymptomatic and have no risk factors and a negative family history for arterial or venous thrombosis or fetal loss, no treatment or specific follow-up care is recommended. In asymptomatic patients with a family history positive for arterial or venous thrombosis or fetal loss, many physicians use antiplatelet prophylaxis, such as aspirin; however, others do not treat patients in the absence of other risk factors. In patients with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

93. Tetanus (Diagnosis)

of neurotransmitter containing vesicles to the cell membrane. As a result, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing and glycine-containing vesicles are not released, and there is a loss of inhibitory action on motor and autonomic neurons. [ ] With this loss of central inhibition, there is autonomic hyperactivity as well as uncontrolled muscle contractions (spasms) in response to normal stimuli such as noises or lights. Once the toxin becomes fixed to neurons, it cannot be neutralized with antitoxin. Recovery (...) of nerve function from tetanus toxins requires sprouting of new nerve terminals and formation of new synapses. Localized tetanus develops when only the nerves supplying the affected muscle are involved. Generalized tetanus develops when the toxin released at the wound spreads through the lymphatics and blood to multiple nerve terminals. The blood-brain barrier prevents direct entry of toxin to the CNS. Previous Next: Etiology Tetanus spores may survive for years in some environments and are resistant

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

94. Tetanus (Overview)

of neurotransmitter containing vesicles to the cell membrane. As a result, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing and glycine-containing vesicles are not released, and there is a loss of inhibitory action on motor and autonomic neurons. [ ] With this loss of central inhibition, there is autonomic hyperactivity as well as uncontrolled muscle contractions (spasms) in response to normal stimuli such as noises or lights. Once the toxin becomes fixed to neurons, it cannot be neutralized with antitoxin. Recovery (...) of nerve function from tetanus toxins requires sprouting of new nerve terminals and formation of new synapses. Localized tetanus develops when only the nerves supplying the affected muscle are involved. Generalized tetanus develops when the toxin released at the wound spreads through the lymphatics and blood to multiple nerve terminals. The blood-brain barrier prevents direct entry of toxin to the CNS. Previous Next: Etiology Tetanus spores may survive for years in some environments and are resistant

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

95. Endocarditis (Overview)

are found in as many as 50% of patients. They include the following: Petechiae: Common, but nonspecific, finding Subungual (splinter) hemorrhages: Dark-red, linear lesions in the nail beds Osler nodes: Tender subcutaneous nodules usually found on the distal pads of the digits Janeway lesions: Nontender maculae on the palms and soles Roth spots: Retinal hemorrhages with small, clear centers; rare Signs of neurologic disease, which occur in as many as 40% of patients, include the following [ ] : Embolic (...) pulmonary infarcts, mycotic aneurysm, intracranial hemorrhage, conjunctival hemorrhage, or Janeway lesions Immunologic phenomenon such as glomerulonephritis, Osler nodes, Roth spots, and rheumatoid factor Positive blood culture results not meeting major criteria or serologic evidence of active infection with an organism consistent with IE Echocardiogram results consistent with IE but not meeting major echocardiographic criteria A definitive clinical diagnosis can be made based on the following: 2 major

2014 eMedicine Emergency Medicine

96. A Study Evaluating The Efficacy And Safety oO CP-690,550 In Asian Subjects With Moderate To Severe Plaque Psoriasis

indicate poor quality of life. Percent Change From Baseline in Nail Psorasis Severity Index (NAPSI) at Week 16 in Participants With Nail Psoriasis at Baseline [ Time Frame: Baseline to Week 16 ] The NAPSI quantifies severity of nail psoriasis by evaluating the presence or absence of psoriatic manifestations on the nail matrix (pitting, leukonychia, red spots on lulunea, crumbling) and nail bed (onycholysis, splinter hemorrhages, subungual hyperkeratosis, oil drop [salmon patch dyschromia]). Each finger (...) psoriasis by evaluating the presence or absence of psoriatic manifestations on the nail matrix (pitting, leukonychia, red spots on lulunea, crumbling) and nail bed (onycholysis, splinter hemorrhages, subungual hyperkeratosis, oil drop [salmon patch dyschromia]). Each finger nail divided with imaginary lines into quadrants and scored for both nail matrix and nail bed psoriasis (range from 0 [absence of psoriasis] to 4 [presence of psoriasis in all 4 quadrants]). The total NAPSI score equals the sum

2013 Clinical Trials

97. Fingernail psoriasis reconsidered: A case-control study. (Abstract)

examination. The disease severity was measured by the NAPSI.Mean NAPSI score in patients and control subjects was 26.6 and 3.6, respectively. Most items included in the NAPSI were specific for nail psoriasis. Onycholysis and splinter hemorrhages were most frequently observed. Leukonychia was more frequent in control subjects. Longitudinal ridges and Beau lines are not included in the NAPSI but are significantly more frequently seen in patients than in control subjects.Limited sample size (...) was a limitation.The NAPSI was able to discriminate patients with fingernail psoriasis from healthy control subjects. Onycholysis and splinter hemorrhages were the most prevalent fingernail changes in psoriatic patients. Leukonychia was more frequently observed in control subjects, which raises the question of whether leukonychia should remain in the NAPSI. On the other hand, longitudinal ridges and Beau lines occurred more frequently in psoriasis but are not included in the NAPSI.Copyright © 2013 American Academy

2013 Journal of American Academy of Dermatology

98. Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting with complicated pneumonia, a case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting with complicated pneumonia, a case report We describe a 2 ½ year old boy presenting with fever, abdominal pain and splinter haemorrhages of the nails. On further examination there were signs of pneumonia with pleural effusion. This was treated with mini-thoracotomy, drainage and intravenous antibiotics. Further diagnostic workup for underlying causes showed diffuse cystic lung disease, suggestive of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. This was confirmed (...) on pathology specimens, which showed Langerhans cells in lung tissue, nail bed and skin biopsy samples, indicating multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The patient was treated with Prednisone and Vinblastin according to the LCH-III guidelines. In this case report we give a brief description on cystic lung disease in children, Langerhans cell histiocytosis and associated nail abnormalities.

2013 Respiratory Medicine Case Reports

99. Medicine isn’t just about accuracy and efficiency

myself to do anything else. As we left, the attending was still writing his note. “What else might you look for in these cases?” he asked. “I’m not sure—” “Her nail beds! Did you look at her nail beds? Sometimes you can see splinter hemorrhages when the infection is severe.” “No,” I said again, trying to rally my thoughts. “This seems so sad to me,” I began. “She’s so young … I just want to make sure all of her comfort-care orders are in.” I wanted to say that Annie’s death was making this room (...) in one of her heart valves. She was given antibiotics and sent directly to the ICU where, before long, she was put on a breathing tube and give medications to sustain her blood pressure. By the time I encountered Annie, two days after her admission, it had become clear that these efforts weren’t working. Her organs were failing, and all the signs pointed to imminent death. Reading her records, I learned that she was an immigrant whose parents, uncles and siblings had suffered from chronic illnesses

2016 KevinMD blog

100. An Open-Label, Prospective Study to Assess the Safety and Effectiveness of Adalimumab in Patients With Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis in the Russian Federation

and nail bed psoriasis. The most affected fingernail was determined at Baseline and used for the analysis. Nail matrix psoriasis consists of any of the following: pitting, leukonychia, red spots in the lunula, or nail plate crumbling. Nail bed psoriasis is the presence or absence of onycholysis, splinter hemorrhages, oil drop (salman patch) discoloration or nail bed hyperkeratosis. Scoring for each is based on the following scale: 0 = none; 1 = present in 1/4 nail quadrants; 2 = present in 2/4 nail (...) score is 0 to 30. A score of 21 to 30 means an extremely large effect on the participant's life whereas 0-1 means that the disease has no effect at all. Change from Baseline is presented as a percentage of the Baseline value: Post-baseline value - Baseline value / Baseline value * 100. A negative change from Baseline indicates improvement. Percent Change From Baseline in Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI) [ Time Frame: Baseline and Week 24 ] NAPSI grades nails for both nail matrix psoriasis

2012 Clinical Trials

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>