How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,192 results for

Mycobacterium Avium Complex

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1101. Comprehensive approach to identification of serovars of Mycobacterium avium complex. (Full text)

Comprehensive approach to identification of serovars of Mycobacterium avium complex. Serotyping of nontuberculous mycobacteria, especially those of the Mycobacterium avium complex, provides important epidemiological information, particularly in tracing origins of infections. Seroagglutination with whole cells and polyclonal rabbit antibodies was the original way of identifying serovars and is still commonly used. The discovery of the glycolipid nature of the typing antigens allows (...) differentiation of serovars on the basis of thin-layer chromatography of whole antigens and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of the characteristic sugars of the oligosaccharide haptens of these antigens. In particular, the generation of monoclonal antibodies to the glycolipid antigens allows facile differentiation of serovars through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All of these protocols were applied in developing a comprehensive approach to the typing of members of the M. avium complex.

1992 Journal of clinical microbiology PubMed abstract

1102. Sparfloxacin, ethambutol, and cortisol receptor inhibitor RU-40 555 treatment for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection of normal C57BL/6 mice. (Full text)

Sparfloxacin, ethambutol, and cortisol receptor inhibitor RU-40 555 treatment for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection of normal C57BL/6 mice. Sparfloxacin (50 mg/kg of body weight given subcutaneously each day), alone or in combination with ethambutol (50 mg/kg given subcutaneously each day), was examined for its therapeutic efficacy against experimental infection induced with the Mycobacterium avium complex in normal C57BL/6 mice. In addition, the potential anti-infective role (...) ethambutol plus RU-40 555 combination was more effective than the sparfloxacin plus ethambutol combination in spleens and lungs (P < 0.001). Thus, in this model, RU-40 555 enhanced the antibacterial activities of the antibiotics tested. Results of the study showed that normal C57BL/6 mice infected with the M. avium complex can be used for the evaluation of antimicrobial agents.

1992 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1103. Efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and RU-40555 in combination with clarithromycin against Mycobacterium avium complex infection in C57BL/6 mice. (Full text)

Efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and RU-40555 in combination with clarithromycin against Mycobacterium avium complex infection in C57BL/6 mice. We compared the activities of two different biological-response modifiers with that of clarithromycin against Mycobacterium avium complex infection in C57BL/6 mice. Mice were pretreated daily with clarithromycin (50 mg/kg of body weight subcutaneously [s.c.]), RU-40555 (100 mg/kg s.c.), or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF (...) ) at low dose (15 micrograms/kg intraperitoneally [i.p.]) or high dose (300 micrograms/kg i.p.) 3 days before intravenous challenge with 2.5 x 10(7) CFU of the MO-1 strain of M. avium complex. Mice were treated daily until sacrifice at day 1, 8, 15, or 21 after challenge, and the numbers of CFU were measured per gram of tissue in lung and spleen. Compared at day 21 with control treatment, clarithromycin significantly decreased the level of infection in spleen (P < 0.0001) and lungs (P < 0.0001

1993 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1104. Production, characterization, and species specificity of monoclonal antibodies to Mycobacterium avium complex protein antigens. (Full text)

Production, characterization, and species specificity of monoclonal antibodies to Mycobacterium avium complex protein antigens. The incidence of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex infections has increased in recent years primarily because a significant proportion of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients develop disseminated M. avium complex disease. In an effort to develop new tools to study these infections, we have produced eight monoclonal antibodies directed (...) against M. avium. Western blot (immunoblot) specificity analysis and protease sensitivity assays indicate that four of these antibodies recognize M. avium-specific protein epitopes and two react with M. avium complex-specific peptide determinants. These monoclonal antibodies may be useful clinically in the diagnosis of M. avium complex disease and in the laboratory for isolation and characterization of native and recombinant M. avium complex antigens.

1990 Infection and immunity PubMed abstract

1105. Effect of pH on the in vitro potency of clarithromycin against Mycobacterium avium complex. (Full text)

Effect of pH on the in vitro potency of clarithromycin against Mycobacterium avium complex. Employing 7H11 agar medium at pH 6.6, the MICs of clarithromycin for 50% (MIC50) and 90% (MIC90) of 19 strains of Mycobacterium avium complex were 8 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. However, the MICs were 2 to 3 log2 dilutions lower in the 7H11 medium adjusted to pH 7.4, and the MICs on 10% OADC (oleic acid-albumin-dextrose-catalase)-enriched Mueller-Hinton agar at pH 7.3 were also 2 log2 dilutions

1991 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1106. In vivo depletion of natural killer cell activity leads to enhanced multiplication of Mycobacterium avium complex in mice. (Full text)

In vivo depletion of natural killer cell activity leads to enhanced multiplication of Mycobacterium avium complex in mice. Earlier investigations have shown that murine natural killer (NK) cells inhibit the growth of fungal and bacterial pathogens in vivo and in vitro. In order to define the role of NK cells in Mycobacterium avium complex infection, in vivo depletion of NK cells by using anti-NK1.1 monoclonal antibody and conventional anti-asialo-GM1 antibody has been attempted. Repeated (...) injection of 200 micrograms of anti-NK1.1 or 50 micrograms of anti-asialo-GM1 antibody effectively depleted NK activity in the spleens of C57BL/6 mice. The growth kinetics of M. avium complex over a period of 4 weeks showed that the colony counts in the spleens of the antibody-treated group were significantly (P less than 0.01) higher than those of the control group and compared well with those of the genetically NK cell-deficient C57BL/6 bg/bg mutant. The alternate strategy of in vivo stimulation of NK

1991 Infection and immunity PubMed abstract

1107. Antimycobacterial spectrum of sparfloxacin and its activities alone and in association with other drugs against Mycobacterium avium complex growing extracellularly and intracellularly in murine and human macrophages. (Full text)

Antimycobacterial spectrum of sparfloxacin and its activities alone and in association with other drugs against Mycobacterium avium complex growing extracellularly and intracellularly in murine and human macrophages. The MICs and MBCs of the new difluorinated quinolone drug sparfloxacin against type strains belonging to 21 species of mycobacteria were screened. The MICs and MBCs were within the range of 0.1 to 2.0 and 0.1 to 4.0 micrograms/ml, respectively (with an MBC/MIC ratio of 1 to 2 (...) ), and against 18 of the 21 species tested, the drug showed significant bactericidal activity (at least 99% killing or more of the initial inoculum added) at concentrations well within the reported peak concentrations in serum (Cmax) in humans. MICs of sparfloxacin for 7 of 10 Mycobacterium avium complex strains were below the Cmax, with MBC/MIC ratios within the range of 2 to 4. Enhancement of its activity by ethambutol, rifampin, amikacin, and clarithromycin (which were used at sublethal concentrations

1991 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1108. Activities of clarithromycin, sulfisoxazole, and rifabutin against Mycobacterium avium complex multiplication within human macrophages. (Full text)

Activities of clarithromycin, sulfisoxazole, and rifabutin against Mycobacterium avium complex multiplication within human macrophages. The activities of clarithromycin, sulfisoxazole, and rifabutin against three virulent strains of Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were evaluated in a model of intracellular infection. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were infected at day 6 of culture with M. avium complex. Intracellular bacteria were

1990 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1109. Characterization of the virulence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) isolates in mice. (Full text)

Characterization of the virulence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) isolates in mice. The virulence of different isolates of MAC was studied in naturally susceptible BALB/c mice. In preliminary experiments, MAC bacteria forming smooth transparent colonies on solid media (SmT variants) were found to be virulent for BALB/c mice, causing progressive infection; smooth opaque (SmOp) were generally avirulent, being slowly eliminated from the infected organs; and rough (Rg) variants were either

1994 Clinical and experimental immunology PubMed abstract

1110. Mycobacterium avium complex infection in mice: lack of exacerbation after LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus infection. (Full text)

Mycobacterium avium complex infection in mice: lack of exacerbation after LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus infection. The murine leukemia virus LP-BM5 has been used to reproduce the model of murine AIDS in order to evaluate the course of infection with the MO-1 strain of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). LP-BM5 was inoculated in C57BL/6 mice by intravenous (i.v.) injection either 8 weeks before an i.v. challenge with 10(3) or 10(6) CFU of MAC (coinfection 1) or 10 days after an i.v. challenge

1996 Infection and immunity PubMed abstract

1111. How effective is KRM-1648 in treatment of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infections in beige mice? (Full text)

How effective is KRM-1648 in treatment of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infections in beige mice? Although the MICs of 3'-hydroxy-5'-(4-isobutyl-1-piperazinyl)benzoxazinorifamycin, or KRM-1648 (KRM), for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) were significantly lower than those of other drugs, its in vivo activity was very weak. Beginning 28 days after inoculation, beige mice that had been infected intravenously with 1.87 x 10(7) CFU of MAC 101 were administered KRM alone, clarithromycin

1996 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1112. Comparative activities of amikacin against Mycobacterium avium complex in nude and beige mice. (Full text)

Comparative activities of amikacin against Mycobacterium avium complex in nude and beige mice. After 4 weeks of treatment, clarithromycin (CLAR) and amikacin showed similar antimicrobial activities against the Mycobacterium avium complex in mice. There was a difference, however, in the effectiveness of the drugs in different types of mice: both drugs displayed bactericidal effects in beige mice but only bacteriostatic effects in nude mice. Because the effectiveness of CLAR is less in nude mice

1997 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1113. In vitro activities of free and liposomal drugs against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex and M. tuberculosis. (Full text)

In vitro activities of free and liposomal drugs against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex and M. tuberculosis. We compared MICs and MBCs of various free- and liposome-incorporated antimicrobial agents against several patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex and certain American Type Culture Collection strains of M. avium, M. intracellulare, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Seven of 19 agents were selected for incorporation into liposomes. The MICs (...) of these agents for 50 and 90% of isolates tested (MIC50s and MIC90s, respectively) ranged from 0.5 to 62 micrograms/ml. Members of the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex were resistant to killing by most of the other agents tested in the free form. However, clofazimine, resorcinomycin A, and PD 117558 showed complete killing of bacteria at concentrations ranging from 8 to 31 micrograms/ml, represented as MBC90s. Among the liposome-incorporated agents, clofazimine and resorcinomycin A had the highest killing

1993 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1114. Efficacies of liposome-encapsulated clarithromycin and ofloxacin against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex in human macrophages. (Full text)

Efficacies of liposome-encapsulated clarithromycin and ofloxacin against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex in human macrophages. The therapeutic efficacies of liposome-encapsulated ofloxacin and clarithromycin against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare (MAI) were evaluated in a model of intramacrophage infection. Liposome encapsulation was found to markedly enhance the uptake of each of the drugs by human macrophages. The human blood-derived macrophages were infected at day 7

1994 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1115. Recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) activate human alveolar macrophages to inhibit growth of Mycobacterium avium complex. (Full text)

Recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) activate human alveolar macrophages to inhibit growth of Mycobacterium avium complex. We investigated the effects of certain macrophage-active cytokines on the phagocytosis and growth inhibition of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by human alveolar macrophages (AM). We also evaluated the effects of pretreatment with each cytokine on the superoxide anion release (O2-) from AM

1994 Clinical and experimental immunology PubMed abstract

1116. In vivo activity of paromomycin against susceptible and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex strains. (Full text)

In vivo activity of paromomycin against susceptible and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex strains. Encouraged by in vitro results, we have assessed the in vivo activity of paromomycin (PRM) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis (resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin), and Mycobacterium avium complex in C57BL/6 mice and their beige counterparts. In all these experiments, PRM was effective in preventing (...) , PRM given at 200 mg/kg was effective, relative to the drug-free control, in reducing the mean log CFU of an isolate of M. tuberculosis resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. In the M. avium complex experiment, PRM given at 200 mg/kg was as effective as amikacin at 50 mg/kg in reducing the mean log CFU in the lungs, livers, and spleens of infected mice. On the basis of our experiments, we believe that PRM has promising activity in vivo in the treatment of infections caused by M

1994 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1117. Determination of MICs for Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex in liquid medium by a colorimetric method. (Full text)

Determination of MICs for Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex in liquid medium by a colorimetric method. We investigated the potential of a rapid colorimetric microassay based on the reduction of dimethylthiazol-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) for determining the growth of Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex (MAC) and MICs of clofazimine, resorcinomycin A, and the quinolone PD 127391 against MAC. The reduction of MTT was directly proportional to the number of viable

1995 Journal of clinical microbiology PubMed abstract

1118. Effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium avium complex in the beige mouse model. (Full text)

Effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium avium complex in the beige mouse model. The results of five chemotherapeutic experiments in beige mice infected with organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex are presented. After monotherapy with various antimicrobial agents for 4 weeks, only clarithromycin, amikacin, and ethambutol displayed definite bactericidal effects; sparfloxacin and clofazimine showed modest bacteriostatic effects; and rifampin and rifabutin were (...) totally inactive against the isolate tested. After treatment for 4 weeks, the large quantities of clofazimine that had accumulated in the organs of mice seriously interfered with the enumeration of the CFU and assessment of the efficacy of the treatment. The in vitro synergistic effects of drug combinations against M. avium complex were not confirmed in beige mice. In combination with clarithromycin, amikacin could prevent the selection of clarithromycin-resistant mutants, whereas minocycline could not.

1994 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1119. Selection of clarithromycin-resistant Mycobacterium avium complex during combined therapy using the beige mouse model. (Full text)

Selection of clarithromycin-resistant Mycobacterium avium complex during combined therapy using the beige mouse model. Sixteen weeks of treatment with clarithromycin (CLARI) alone displayed significant bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium avium complex infection in beige mice. Only two combined regimens, CLARI combined with an initial 4 or 8 weeks of amikacin (AMIKA), displayed activity greater than that displayed by CLARI alone. Four other combined regimens, CLARI combined

1995 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

1120. Therapy of Mycobacterium avium complex infections in beige mice with streptomycin encapsulated in sterically stabilized liposomes. (Full text)

Therapy of Mycobacterium avium complex infections in beige mice with streptomycin encapsulated in sterically stabilized liposomes. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes serious opportunistic infections in AIDS patients. Previous studies with MAC-infected beige mice have indicated that weekly administration of liposome-encapsulated streptomycin can reduce significantly the CFU in the liver and spleen. We examined whether streptomycin encapsulated in recently developed sterically stabilized

1995 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy PubMed abstract

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>