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Mushroom Poisoning

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2. Silibinin in suspected amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning

Silibinin in suspected amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning BestBets: Silibinin in suspected amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning Silibinin in suspected amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning Report By: Guillaume Lacombe - PGY 3, Emergency Medicine Search checked by Maude St-Onge - Quebec Poison Centre Institution: Université Laval, Quebec, Canada Date Submitted: 2nd September 2015 Date Completed: 17th February 2016 Last Modified: 17th February 2016 Status: Green (complete) Three Part (...) Question In [patients presenting to the ER with a suspected amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning], is [silibinin better than conservative treatment] at [reducing the need for liver transplantation and reducing mortality]? Clinical Scenario A 36-year-old woman presents to the emergency department after eating some unidentified wild mushrooms 12 h previously. She is complaining of abdominal pain and diarrhoea, which started 2 h before. The toxidrome leads you to suspect that the mushroom may have been

2016 BestBETS

3. Mushroom Poisoning Mimicking Painless Progressive Jaundice: A Case Report with Review of the Literature (PubMed)

Mushroom Poisoning Mimicking Painless Progressive Jaundice: A Case Report with Review of the Literature Mushroom poisoning is common in the United States. The severity of mushroom poisoning may vary, depending on the geographic location, the amount of toxin delivered, and the genetic characteristics of the mushroom. Though they could have varied presentation, early identification with careful history could be helpful in triage. We present a case of a 69-year-old female of false morel mushroom (...) poisoning leading to hepatotoxicity with painless jaundice and biochemical pancreatitis.

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2018 Cureus

4. Serum Paraoxonase, Arylesterase, and Glutathione-S-Transferase Activities and Oxidative Stress Levels in Patients with Mushroom Poisoning (PubMed)

Serum Paraoxonase, Arylesterase, and Glutathione-S-Transferase Activities and Oxidative Stress Levels in Patients with Mushroom Poisoning Consumption of toxic species of mushrooms may have detrimental effects and increase oxidative stress. Paraoxonase, arylesterase and glutathione-S-transferase are antioxidants that resist oxidative stress. In this study, we analyzed the changes in these enzymes during intoxication due to mushrooms.The study enrolled 49 adult patients with a diagnosis (...) of mushroom poisoning according to clinical findings and 49 healthy volunteers as the control group. The patients with mild clinical findings were hospitalized due to the possibility that the patient had also eaten the mushrooms and due to clinical findings in the late period, which could be fatal. Paraoxonase, arylesterase, and glutathione-S-transferase concentrations, as well as total antioxidant and oxidant status, were determined in the 49 patients and 49 healthy volunteers by taking blood samples

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2018 Clinics

5. Potential value of urinary amatoxin quantification in patients with hepatotoxic mushroom poisoning. (PubMed)

Potential value of urinary amatoxin quantification in patients with hepatotoxic mushroom poisoning. Mushroom poisoning with Amanita phalloides or similar species can lead to liver failure with 10-30% mortality rates. We aimed at defining the prognostic value of urinary amatoxin quantification in patients with hepatotoxic mushroom poisoning.Data from 32 patients with hepatotoxic mushroom poisoning (Hospital Clínic Barcelona, 2002-16) in whom urinary amatoxins were determined (ELISA) were (...) ≥ 70 ng/ml, 4 developed severe ALI.In patients with hepatotoxic mushroom poisoning, a negative urinary amatoxin quantification within 72h of intake ruled out the risk of hepatotoxicity in 92% of patients, whereas positive urinary amatoxins were associated with hepatotoxicity and severe ALI. Concentrations >55 ng/ml and ≥ 70 ng/ml were predictive of hepatotoxicity and severe ALI, respectively.© 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

2018 Liver International

7. Features of Patients With Severe Hepatitis Due to Mushroom Poisoning and Factors Associated with Outcome. (PubMed)

Features of Patients With Severe Hepatitis Due to Mushroom Poisoning and Factors Associated with Outcome. Acute liver failure after ingestion of toxic mushrooms is a significant medical problem. Most exposures to toxic mushrooms produce no symptoms or only mild gastroenteritis, but some lead to severe hepatic necrosis and fulminant hepatic failure requiring liver transplantation. We aimed to assess mortality from mushroom poisoning and identify variables associated with survival and liver (...) %), respectively, could have avoided transfer to a transplant center.In an analysis of 27 patients with hepatocellular damage due to mushroom (Amanita) poisoning and peak levels of total bilirubin greater than 2 mg/dL, the probability of liver transplantation or death is 17%, fulfilling Hy's law. Patients with peak levels of aspartate aminotransferase less than 4000 IU/L can be monitored in a local hospital, whereas patients with higher levels should be transferred to liver transplant centers. Women and older

2017 Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

8. Amanita phalloides Mushroom Poisonings — Northern California, December 2016 (PubMed)

Amanita phalloides Mushroom Poisonings — Northern California, December 2016 Amanita phalloides, colloquially known as the "death cap," belongs to the Phalloideae section of the Amanita family of mushrooms and is responsible for most deaths following ingestion of foraged mushrooms worldwide (1). On November 28, 2016, members of the Bay Area Mycological Society notified personnel at the California Poison Control System (CPCS) of an unusually large A. phalloides bloom in the greater San (...) Francisco Bay Area, coincident with the abundant rainfall and recent warm weather. Five days later, CPCS received notification of the first human A. phalloides poisoning of the season. Over the following 2 weeks, CPCS was notified of an additional 13 cases of hepatotoxicity resulting from A. phalloides ingestion. In the past few years before this outbreak, CPCS received reports of only a few mushroom poisoning cases per year. A summary of 14 reported cases is presented here. Data extracted from patient

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2017 MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report

9. Mushroom Poisoning in the Northeast of Iran; a Retrospective 6-Year Epidemiologic Study (PubMed)

Mushroom Poisoning in the Northeast of Iran; a Retrospective 6-Year Epidemiologic Study Toxic mushrooms are distributed across the globe with over 5000 species. Among them, 100 species are responsible for most of the cases of mushroom poisoning. This study aimed to evaluate the epidemiologic pattern of mushroom poisoning among patients referred to the main toxicology center of Mashhad province located in North-east of Iran.This cross-sectional study was conducted on patients with final (...) diagnosis of mushroom poisoning referred to the toxicology center of Mashhad, Iran, from February 2005 to 2011. Patients' demographic characteristics, clinical presentations, laboratory findings, outcomes, and therapeutic measures were collected using a predesigned checklist and searching patient's profile.32 cases with the mean age of 24.6 ± 16.7 years were presented to the toxicology center following mushroom poisoning (59% female). Mushroom poisoning accounted for 0.1% of all admitted cases. The mean

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2017 Emergency

10. Clinical characteristics and outcome of toxicity from Amanita mushroom poisoning (PubMed)

Clinical characteristics and outcome of toxicity from Amanita mushroom poisoning To describe and analyze the clinical characteristics and outcome of amatoxin poisoning cases.We performed a retrospective cohort study of amatoxin poisoning cases from Ramathibodi Poison Center Toxic Exposure Surveillance System, from May 2013 to August 2015.There were 30 consultations with a total of 55 poisoning cases. Most cases were male and from the north-east region. Hepatitis, acute kidney injury, jaundice (...) with silymarin at 1.68 g/day dosage. Thus, the fatality in oral silymarin treatment group was 12.5%. We performed the analysis between the dead and survival groups. We found that in hepatitis, initial and maximum serum aspartate transaminase, initial and maximum serum alanine transaminase, and acute kidney injury were significantly different between the two groups.Amanita mushroom poisoning caused high fatalities. Serum transaminase and creatinine were the factors associated with death. Treatment with oral

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2017 International journal of general medicine

11. A Case of Mushroom Poisoning with Russula subnigricans: Development of Rhabdomyolysis, Acute Kidney Injury, Cardiogenic Shock, and Death (PubMed)

A Case of Mushroom Poisoning with Russula subnigricans: Development of Rhabdomyolysis, Acute Kidney Injury, Cardiogenic Shock, and Death Mushroom exposures are increasing worldwide. The incidence and fatality of mushroom poisoning are reported to be increasing. Several new syndromes in mushroom poisoning have been described. Rhabdomyolytic mushroom poisoning is one of new syndromes. Russula subnigricans mushroom can cause delayed-onset rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury in the severely (...) poisoned patient. There are few reports on the toxicity of R. subnigricans. This report represents the first record of R. subnigricans poisoning with rhabdomyolysis in Korea, describing a 51-year-old man who suffered from rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, severe hypocalcemia, respiratory failure, ventricular tachycardia, cardiogenic shock, and death. Mushroom poisoning should be considered in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis of unknown cause. Furthermore, R. subnigricans should be considered

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2016 Journal of Korean medical science

12. Mushroom poisoning: a retrospective study concerning 11-years of admissions in a Swiss Emergency Department. (PubMed)

Mushroom poisoning: a retrospective study concerning 11-years of admissions in a Swiss Emergency Department. Wild mushroom intoxication is an unusual cause of toxic ingestion in Europe. A great diversity of clinical symptoms may arise depending on the variety of wild mushrooms ingested. These initial symptoms are often non-specific, with frequent gastrointestinal symptoms, and have no direct correlation with the outcome. Therefore, management of mushroom poisoning and risk evaluation (...) are a challenge for emergency clinicians. We retrospectively reviewed all cases of mushroom poisoning identified in the ED database spanning 11 years. Demographic and clinical data, time from consumption to symptoms, type of mushrooms, the number of patients presenting at the same time, treatment(s) provided, length of stay, discharge diagnosis, in-hospital mortality, and serious complications were evaluated. We identify 87 cases of mushroom poisoning. The most common symptoms are nausea and vomiting (71

2016 Internal and emergency medicine

13. Mushroom poisoning: an overlooked cause of acute liver injury in China. (PubMed)

Mushroom poisoning: an overlooked cause of acute liver injury in China. 27943509 2018 08 24 2018 08 24 1478-3231 37 3 2017 03 Liver international : official journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver Liver Int. Mushroom poisoning: an overlooked cause of acute liver injury in China. 468-469 10.1111/liv.13334 Geng Jiawei J Department of Infectious Diseases, The First People's Hospital of Yunnan Province, The Affiliated Hospital of Kunming University of Science (...) Emergency Department, The First People's Hospital of Yunnan Province, The Affiliated Hospital of Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan, China. Pan Qiuwei Q Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. eng Letter Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't 2016 12 26 United States Liver Int 101160857 1478-3223 IM China Hospitalization Humans Liver Failure, Acute epidemiology etiology therapy Mushroom Poisoning complications

2016 Liver International

14. Mushroom Poisoning

Mushroom Poisoning Mushroom Poisoning Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Mushroom Poisoning Mushroom Poisoning Aka (...) : Mushroom Poisoning From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Prepared foods with toxic mushrooms is most common type of lethal exposure III. Types Neurotoxic mushrooms Amanita muscaria and pantherina ( ) Inocybe and Clitocybe species (parasympathetic) Coprinus atramentarius ( -like effect) Psilcybe ( ) Gyromitra esculenta or false morel: severe Hepatotoxic mushrooms Amanita phalloides (severe hepatotoxicity) White cap and white gills Stem ascends from a cup at the base of the mushroom Stem encircled

2018 FP Notebook

15. Acute Liver Injury and Acute Liver Failure from Mushroom Poisoning in North America. (PubMed)

Acute Liver Injury and Acute Liver Failure from Mushroom Poisoning in North America. Published estimates of survival associated with mushroom (amatoxin)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) and injury (ALI) with and without liver transplant (LT) are highly variable. We aimed to determine the 21-day survival associated with amatoxin-induced ALI (A-ALI) and ALF (A-ALF) and review use of targeted therapies.Cohort study of all A-ALI/A-ALF patients enrolled in the US ALFSG registry between 01/1998 (...) post-LT. Comparing those who died/received LT (non-spontaneous survivors [NSS]) with spontaneous survivors (SS), N-acetylcysteine was used in nearly all patients (NSS 88% vs. SS 80%); whereas, silibinin (25% vs. 50%), penicillin (50% vs. 25%) and nasobiliary drainage (0 vs. 10%) were used less frequently (P > 0.15 for all therapies).Patients with mushroom poisoning with ALI have favourable survival, while around half of those presenting with ALF may eventually require LT. Further study is needed

2016 Liver International

16. BET 1: Silibinin in suspected amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning. (PubMed)

BET 1: Silibinin in suspected amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning. A shortcut review was carried out to establish whether silibinin is better than conservative management at reducing liver transplantation and death after poisoning with amatoxin-containing mushrooms. Thirty-eight papers were found in Medline and 86 in EMBASE using the reported searches. Of these, five presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group (...) studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. It is concluded that the evidence is limited, but given the lack of alternative treatments in patients with suspected amatoxin-containing mushroom poisoning and the relatively few adverse effects, silibinin should be considered in some patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company

2016 Emergency Medicine Journal

17. Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning: A Report of Two Cases (PubMed)

Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning: A Report of Two Cases Of the more than 5000 species of mushrooms known, 100 types are toxic and approximately 10% of these toxic types can cause fatal toxicity. A type of mushroom called Amanita phalloides is responsible for 95% of toxic mushroom poisonings. In this article, we report 2 cases of mushroom poisonings caused by Lactarius volemus, known as Tirmit by the local people. The patient and his wife were admitted to the emergency room (...) with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting 20 hours after consuming Lactarius volemus, an edible type of mushroom. The patients reported that they had been collecting this mushroom from the mountains and eating them for several years but had never developed any clinicopathology to date. Further examination of the patients revealed a very rare case of acute pancreatitis due to mushroom intoxication. The male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit while his wife was followed in the internal medicine

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2016 Journal of investigative medicine high impact case reports

18. CRACKCast E164 – Plants, Mushrooms, and Herbal Medications

ingestion will prove to involve a non–life-threatening substance GI symptoms that onset in more than 6 to 8 hours suggest a potentially life-threatening ingestion, such as the cyclopeptide and gyromitrin groups Use local poison control centers, mycologists, and botanists to help identify serious plants and mushrooms that have been ingested. We recommend digital photography with expert consultation Herbal medications are unregulated and may have inherent toxicity, herb-drug interactions, or contaminants (...) A PIC EM (relevant mushroom toxins) G : Gyrometrin O : Orellanine A : Amatoxin P : Psilocybin I : Ibotenic Acid C: Coprine E: Emetogenic (early GI group) M : Muscamol [3] List 4 mechanisms of toxicity resulting from the use of herbal medicine Ephedra sympathomimetic Ma huang sympathomimetic Jimsonweed anticholinergic St John’s Wart MAOI SS, decreases INR [4] List 4 plants containing cardiac glycosides FOLM Foxglove Oleander Lilly of the Valley Milkweed [5] What is Buckthorn? Poisonous fruit from

2018 CandiEM

19. CRACKCast E147 – General Approach to the Poisoned Patient

CRACKCast E147 – General Approach to the Poisoned Patient CRACKCast E147 – General Approach to the Poisoned Patient - CanadiEM CRACKCast E147 – General Approach to the Poisoned Patient In , , by Adam Thomas January 25, 2018 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s 9th Edition Chapter 139, General Approach to the Poisoned Patient. Poisonings are a staple presentation in any Emergency Department. Information gained from this episode will better prepare you to deal with the patient reporting acute (...) -hypnotic, and opioid categories. Qualitative urine drug levels are inferior to quantitative serum levels in terms of guiding specific therapy. Syrup of ipecac is not indicated in the ED care of a poisoned patient. Gastric lavage is not part of routine care. When given in a timely fashion (1 hour post ingestion), activated charcoal may be indicated for potentially lethal agents in alert, cooperative patients. Whole-bowel irrigation is rarely useful for management of poisoned patients but is potentially

2018 CandiEM

20. Mushroom intoxication, a fatal condition in Romanian children: Two case reports. (PubMed)

Mushroom intoxication, a fatal condition in Romanian children: Two case reports. Approximately 5000 species of wild mushroom are reported worldwide, of which 100 are documented as poisonous and <10 are fatal. The clinical picture of patients with wild mushroom intoxication depends mostly on the type of ingested mushroom, ranging from mild gastrointestinal symptoms to organ failure and death.We report 2 children, sister and brother admitted in our clinic for gastrointestinal symptoms: abdominal (...) to the pediatric intensive care unit for appropriate supportive measure. Therefore, therapeutic plasma exchange was initiated along with N-acetyl cysteine and hemostatic drugs.Despite all these therapeutic interventions, both cases developed hepatorenal syndrome and died after a couple of days from ingestion.Mushroom poisoning remains a public health problem in developing countries. Preventable strategies and education regarding the consumption of wild type mushrooms are essential for decreasing the morbidity

2019 Medicine

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