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Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women

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1. Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women

Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Musculoskeletal (...) Injuries in Women Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women Aka: Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women , Female Athlete Injury Risks II. Associated Conditions: Musculoskeletal Injuries for which women are higher risk ( ) s (Type I) -related s Joint dislocations (ligament laxity) ( ) s Women are at higher risk of s, secondary symptoms, cognitive and prolonged recovery III. References Madsen, Walter and McGregor (2018) Crit Dec Emerg Med 32(3): 15-24 Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images

2018 FP Notebook

2. Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women

Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Musculoskeletal (...) Injuries in Women Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women Aka: Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women , Female Athlete Injury Risks II. Associated Conditions: Musculoskeletal Injuries for which women are higher risk ( ) s (Type I) -related s Joint dislocations (ligament laxity) ( ) s Women are at higher risk of s, secondary symptoms, cognitive and prolonged recovery III. References Madsen, Walter and McGregor (2018) Crit Dec Emerg Med 32(3): 15-24 Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images

2018 FP Notebook

3. Overview of musculoskeletal pain

in approximately 13% of the adult Danish population, Sjogren P, Ekholm O, Peuckmann V, et al. Epidemiology of chronic pain in Denmark: an update. Eur J Pain. 2009;13:287-292. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18547844?tool=bestpractice.com 16% of adults in the UK, Elliott AM, Smith BH, Penny KI, et al. The epidemiology of chronic pain in the community. Lancet. 1999;354:1248-1252. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10520633?tool=bestpractice.com and 40% to 67% of women in New Zealand. Taylor W. Musculoskeletal (...) Overview of musculoskeletal pain Overview of musculoskeletal pain - Summary of relevant conditions | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Overview of musculoskeletal pain Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: July 2018 Introduction Musculoskeletal pain is very common, may be acute or chronic, and is a major cause of morbidity and occupational sickness absence. Studies have found a prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal pain

2018 BMJ Best Practice

4. Non-Steroidal or Opioid Analgesia Use for Children With Musculoskeletal Injuries

Non-Steroidal or Opioid Analgesia Use for Children With Musculoskeletal Injuries Non-Steroidal or Opioid Analgesia Use for Children With Musculoskeletal Injuries - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding (...) more. Non-Steroidal or Opioid Analgesia Use for Children With Musculoskeletal Injuries (No OUCH) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03767933 Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting First Posted : December 7

2018 Clinical Trials

5. Musculoskeletal injury profiles in professional Women's Tennis Association players. (PubMed)

Musculoskeletal injury profiles in professional Women's Tennis Association players. The physical demands of professional tennis combined with high training/match loads can contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe the type, location and severity of injuries sustained during a 12-month tennis season in a cohort of professional female tennis players on the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) tour and (2) prospectively investigate associations between (...) training/match loads and injury.52 WTA players competing at the Australian Open (2015) consented to participate. Injuries reported to WTA medical staff were classified using tennis-specific guidelines. Individual match exposure data were collected for all matches played at international level in 2015 and expressed per 1000 hours of WTA competition matchplay (MP) and 1000 match exposures (MEs). Variables associated with the number of injuries in the season and loss of time from competition were

2017 British Journal of Sports Medicine

6. Musculoskeletal Effects of 2 Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling Paradigms Conducted at Different Cadences for People With Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study. (PubMed)

Musculoskeletal Effects of 2 Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling Paradigms Conducted at Different Cadences for People With Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Study. To compare the musculoskeletal effects of low cadence cycling with functional electrical stimulation (FES) with high cadence FES cycling for people with spinal cord injury (SCI).Randomized pre-post design.Outpatient rehabilitation clinic.Participants (N=17; 14 men, 3 women; age range, 22-67y) with C4-T6 motor complete chronic SCI (...) macroarchitecture and thigh muscle volume, and biochemical markers were used to assess bone turnover. It was hypothesized that subjects using low cadence cycling would cycle with greater torque and therefore show greater musculoskeletal improvements than subjects using high cadence cycling.A total of 15 participants completed the study. Low cadence cycling obtained a maximal average torque of 2.9±2.8Nm, and high cadence cycling obtained a maximal average torque of 0.8±0.2Nm. Low cadence cycling showed greater

2017 Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation

7. Meta-analysis of Cigarette Smoking and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Military Training. (PubMed)

on articles published through October 2016. Search terms focused on lower-extremity overuse musculoskeletal injuries and cigarette smoking in military populations. We conducted a meta-analysis overall and by sex, including smoking intensity.We identified 129 potential studies and selected 18 based on quality. The overall rate ratio for smoking was 1.31, 1.31 for men, and 1.23 for women. Overall and for each sex, rate ratios were significantly greater than 1.0 for each intensity level of smoking.Smoking (...) is a moderate risk factor for musculoskeletal injury and may account for a meaningful proportion of injuries among men and women due to the high prevalence of smoking and injury in this population. Although enlistees are not allowed to smoke during basic training, their risk of injury remains high, indicating that smokers may remain at increased risk for medium- to long-term duration.

2017 Medicine and science in sports and exercise

8. A Systematic Review of the Association Between Physical Fitness and Musculoskeletal Injury Risk: Part 2 - Muscular Endurance and Muscular Strength. (PubMed)

A Systematic Review of the Association Between Physical Fitness and Musculoskeletal Injury Risk: Part 2 - Muscular Endurance and Muscular Strength. de la Motte, SJ, Gribbin, TC, Lisman, P, Murphy, K, and Deuster, PA. A systematic review of the association between physical fitness and musculoskeletal injury risk: part 2-muscular endurance and muscular strength. J Strength Cond Res 31(11): 3218-3234, 2017-This is a systematic review and evaluation of the current evidence on the association (...) between both muscular endurance (ME) and muscular strength (MS) and musculoskeletal injury (MSK-I) risk in military and civilian populations. MEDLINE, EBSCO, EMBASE, and the Defense Technical Information Center were searched for original studies published from 1970 through 2015 which examined associations between physical fitness (ME and MS) and MSK-I in military or civilian populations. Methodological quality and strength of the evidence were determined following criteria adapted from previously

2017 Journal of Strength And Conditioning Research

9. The dose-response effects of aerobic exercise on musculoskeletal injury: a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. (PubMed)

The dose-response effects of aerobic exercise on musculoskeletal injury: a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. In a post hoc analysis, we quantified the risk of musculoskeletal injury (MSI) associated with different volumes of aerobic exercise in a randomized trial. Premenopausal women (n = 119) were randomized to one of three groups: low-dose aerobic exercise (150 min·per week), high-dose aerobic exercise (300 min·per week) or control (usual activity) for 5 months. Compared to the control

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2017 Research in sports medicine (Print)

10. Concussion May Increase the Risk of Subsequent Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injury in Collegiate Athletes (PubMed)

Concussion May Increase the Risk of Subsequent Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injury in Collegiate Athletes Laboratory-based studies on neuromuscular control after concussion and epidemiological studies suggest that concussion may increase the risk of subsequent musculoskeletal injury.The purpose of this study was to determine if athletes have an increased risk of lower extremity musculoskeletal injury after return to play from a concussion.Injury data were collected from 2006 to 2013 (...) for men's football and for women's basketball, soccer and lacrosse at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Ninety cases of in-season concussion in 73 athletes (52 male, 21 female) with return to play at least 30 days prior to the end of the season were identified. A period of up to 90 days of in-season competition following return to play was reviewed for time-loss injury. The same period was studied in up to two control athletes who had no concussion within the prior year

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2017 Sports medicine (Auckland, N.Z.)

11. Musculoskeletal Strains and Sprains - Guidelines for Prescribing NSAIDs

pain (8.42/1000 ), shoulder pain ( 6.97 /1000 ), and neck pain ( 6.50/1000 ). Because pain and inflammation increase prostaglandin production, drugs that inhibit peripheral prostaglandin production reduce pain by decreasing the transmission of pain impulses from the periphery to the CNS. For more information, go to: Clinical Knowledge Summaries – . (Free access, registration required) e-therapeutics+ - Musculoskeletal Disorders: Sports Injuries. Available at Patients with musculoskeletal injuries (...) Other medications -- some medications can cause pain as a side effect (see below) Musculoskeletal strains and sprains are assessed based on history and the presence of pain and swelling. Rule out the following conditions that may present with similar signs and symptoms: Fracture - indicated by marked bruising, swelling, deformity, bone tenderness, or inability to bear weight. Tendon rupture - indicated by inability to move muscle. Cartilage injury - indicated by tearing sensation, severe pain

2017 medSask

12. Nanobubbles Water Curcumin Extract Reduces Injury Risks on Drop Jumps in Women: A Pilot Study. (PubMed)

Nanobubbles Water Curcumin Extract Reduces Injury Risks on Drop Jumps in Women: A Pilot Study. To verify the beneficial effects of Nanobubbles water curcumin extract (NCE) supplementation on health promotion and to demonstrate the application of NCE in reducing the risk of musculoskeletal injury.In the current study, 12 females were randomly assigned to NCE (15g/day) and maltodextrin groups. Performance and related body composition were evaluated at 2 time points-presupplementation (pre (...) -) and after 4 weeks of postsupplementation (post-). The posttest consists of a set of biochemical parameters for antifatigue activity and injury status evaluation.NCE group exhibited significantly lower levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), triglycerides (TG), and higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) after a 4-week supplementation, compared with the placebo group. After a 15-minute session on the spinning bike, serum lactate and ammonia levels were decreased and glucose

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2019 Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (eCAM)

13. Characteristics and prevalence of musculoskeletal injury in professional and non-professional ballet dancers (PubMed)

Characteristics and prevalence of musculoskeletal injury in professional and non-professional ballet dancers Ballet is a high-performance activity that requires an advanced level of technical skills. Ballet places great stress on tendons, muscles, bones, and joints and may act directly as a trigger of injury by overuse.1) to describe the main types of injuries and affected areas related to classical ballet and 2) to compare the frequency of musculoskeletal injuries among professional and non (...) -professional ballet dancers, considering possible gender differences among the professional dancers.A total of 110 questionnaires were answered by professional and non-professional dancers. The questionnaire contained items related to the presence of injury, the regions involved, and the mechanism of the injury.We observed a high frequency of musculoskeletal injuries, with ankle sprains accounting for 69.8% of injuries in professional dancers and 42.1% in non-professional dancers. Pirouettes were the most

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2016 Brazilian journal of physical therapy

14. Predicting Musculoskeletal Injury in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II Athletes From Asymmetries and Individual-Test Versus Composite Functional Movement Screen Scores (PubMed)

Predicting Musculoskeletal Injury in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II Athletes From Asymmetries and Individual-Test Versus Composite Functional Movement Screen Scores Functional Movement Screen (FMS) scores of ≤14 have been used to predict injury in athletic populations. Movement asymmetries and poor-quality movement patterns in other functional tests have been shown to predict musculoskeletal injury (MSI). Therefore, movement asymmetry or poor-quality movement patterns (...) on the FMS may have more utility in predicting MSI than the composite score.To determine if an asymmetry or score of 1 on an individual FMS test would predict MSI in collegiate athletes.Cohort study.National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II university athletic program.A total of 84 Division II rowers, volleyball players, and soccer players (men: n = 20, age = 20.4 ± 1.3 years, height = 1.77 ± 0.04 m, mass = 73.5 ± 4.8 kg; women: n = 64, age = 19.1 ± 1.2 years, height = 1.69 ± 0.09 m, mass

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2016 Journal of athletic training

15. Description and Rate of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Air Force Basic Military Trainees, 2012−2014 (PubMed)

July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2014. Incidence density rate of all musculoskeletal injuries (stratified by body region and type) and factors and costs associated with injuries. Of the 67 525 trainees, 12.5% sustained 1 or more musculoskeletal injuries. The overall incidence density rate was 18.3 injuries per 1000 person-weeks (15.1 for men and 29.4 for women). The most common diagnosis (n = 2984) was Pain in joint, lower leg, as described in the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (...) Description and Rate of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Air Force Basic Military Trainees, 2012−2014  Musculoskeletal injuries are common in military trainees and have significant medical and operational effects. To provide current musculoskeletal injury epidemiology data for US Air Force basic military trainees. Descriptive epidemiologic study with cross-sectional features. US Air Force Basic Military Training, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. All recruits who entered training between

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2016 Journal of athletic training

16. Physical Activity and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women: The Women's Injury Study (PubMed)

Physical Activity and Musculoskeletal Injuries in Women: The Women's Injury Study Increased injury rates have been associated with physical activity (PA). The differences in musculoskeletal injury (MSI) characteristics resulting from PA, versus those unrelated to PA, are unknown. We describe the pattern of PA and non-PA MSI incurred by community-dwelling women.Data were extracted from the Women's Injury Study, a web-based observational study that tracked weekly PA behaviors and self-reported (...) MSI of 909 community-dwelling women ages 20-83 years. The primary outcome was self-reported MSI that interrupted daily activities ≥2 days and/or required treatment from a health care provider. Follow-up telephone reporting of MSIs allowed further description of injuries. Mixed effects logistic regression was used to identify injury sites associated with PA, controlling for age, body mass index, previous injury, and use of alcohol.Incidence of PA and non-PA MSIs were comparable; some differences

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2013 Journal of Women's Health

17. A cross-sectional study of the effects of load carriage on running characteristics and tibial mechanical stress: implications for stress-fracture injuries in women. (PubMed)

A cross-sectional study of the effects of load carriage on running characteristics and tibial mechanical stress: implications for stress-fracture injuries in women. Load carriage is associated with musculoskeletal injuries, such as stress fractures, during military basic combat training. By investigating the influence of load carriage during exercises on the kinematics and kinetics of the body and on the biomechanical responses of bones, such as the tibia, we can quantify the role of load (...) carriage on bone health.We conducted a cross-sectional study using an integrated musculoskeletal-finite-element model to analyze how the amount of load carriage in women affected the kinematics and kinetics of the body, as well as the tibial mechanical stress during running. We also compared the biomechanics of walking (studied previously) and running under various load-carriage conditions.We observed substantial changes in both hip kinematics and kinetics during running when subjects carried a load

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2017 BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

18. Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain

a particular interest making evidence accessible and useful to practitioners and to others making decisions about health. Before joining Cochrane, Sarah also worked on systematic reviews for the University of Oxford and the Royal College of Nursing Institute, and obtained degrees in History from the University of Oxford and in the history of women’s health and illness in early modern England (MPhil., University of Reading). Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain by Sarah Chapman (...) Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain Topical NSAIDs: good relief for acute musculoskeletal pain - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By June 25, 2015 // Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed for mild to moderate pain and are the most commonly prescribed painkilling drugs worldwide. Taken by mouth or injected into a vein, the high concentrations of the drug throughout the body, necessary in order to work at the site of pain

2015 Evidently Cochrane

19. Overview of sport-related injuries

(suppl 6):2-8. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8947416?tool=bestpractice.com Crisco JJ, Jokl P, Heinen GT, et al. A muscle contusion injury model: biomechanics, physiology, and histology. Am J Sports Med. 1994;22:702-710. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7810797?tool=bestpractice.com Predisposing factors for muscle sprains and strains and other types of musculoskeletal injury include type of muscle architecture, muscular imbalance, previous injury, fatigue, chronic overload, and inadequate warm (...) , pain does not radiate to the legs or beyond the knee. LBP may arise as an overuse injury among sportsmen such as weightlifters. Calhoon G, Fry AC. Injury rates and profiles of elite competitive weightlifters. J Athl Train. 1999;34:232-238. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16558570?tool=bestpractice.com The character of chest pain should be determined to help differentiate between cardiac, respiratory, musculoskeletal, and other causes. Pain in the chest may be referred (e.g., from cervical spine

2018 BMJ Best Practice

20. Assessment of knee injury

Assessment of knee injury Assessment of knee injury - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of knee injury Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: June 2018 Summary A 2008 study stated that the most common musculoskeletal tendinous and ligamentous injuries were knee injuries. Clayton RA, Court-Brown CM. The epidemiology of musculoskeletal tendinous and ligamentous injuries. Injury. 2008;39:1338 (...) /20463501?tool=bestpractice.com Hauret KG, Jones BH, Bullock SH, et al. Musculoskeletal injuries: description of an under-recognized injury problem among military personnel. Am J Prev Med. 2010;38(1 Suppl):S61-S70. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20117601?tool=bestpractice.com Engebretsen L, Steffen K, Alonso JM, et al. Sports injuries and illnesses during the Winter Olympic Games 2010. Br J Sports Med. 2010;44:772-780. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20820057?tool=bestpractice.com Patzer T

2018 BMJ Best Practice

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