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2. Infectious mononucleosis

Infectious mononucleosis Infectious mononucleosis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Infectious mononucleosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: October 2018 Summary Characterised by the classic triad of fever, pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy, along with atypical lymphocytosis. Often subclinical in young children. Positive heterophile antibody test and serological test for antibodies against EBV (...) are usually diagnostic. Rare but potentially life-threatening complications include severe upper airway obstruction, splenic rupture, fulminant hepatitis, encephalitis, severe thrombocytopenia, and haemolytic anaemia. Treatment is usually symptomatic. Definition Infectious mononucleosis (IM), also known as glandular fever, is a clinical syndrome most commonly caused by Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection. Lajo A, Borque C, Del Castillo F, et al. Mononucleosis caused by Epstein-Barr virus

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Infectious mononucleosis

Infectious mononucleosis Infectious mononucleosis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Infectious mononucleosis Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: October 2018 Summary Characterised by the classic triad of fever, pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy, along with atypical lymphocytosis. Often subclinical in young children. Positive heterophile antibody test and serological test for antibodies against EBV (...) are usually diagnostic. Rare but potentially life-threatening complications include severe upper airway obstruction, splenic rupture, fulminant hepatitis, encephalitis, severe thrombocytopenia, and haemolytic anaemia. Treatment is usually symptomatic. Definition Infectious mononucleosis (IM), also known as glandular fever, is a clinical syndrome most commonly caused by Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection. Lajo A, Borque C, Del Castillo F, et al. Mononucleosis caused by Epstein-Barr virus

2018 BMJ Best Practice

4. Antiviral agents for infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever). (PubMed)

Antiviral agents for infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever). Infectious mononucleosis (IM) is a clinical syndrome, usually caused by the Epstein Barr virus (EPV), characterised by lymphadenopathy, fever and sore throat. Most cases of symptomatic IM occur in older teenagers or young adults. Usually IM is a benign self-limiting illness and requires only symptomatic treatment. However, occasionally the disease course can be complicated or prolonged and lead to decreased productivity in terms (...) of school or work. Antiviral medications have been used to treat IM, but the use of antivirals for IM is controversial. They may be effective by preventing viral replication which helps to keep the virus inactive. However, there are no guidelines for antivirals in IM.To assess the effects of antiviral therapy for infectious mononucleosis (IM).We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 3, March 2016), which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI

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2016 Cochrane

5. Systematic review with meta analysis: No new evidence to support the routine use of steroids in the treatment of infectious mononucleosis

Systematic review with meta analysis: No new evidence to support the routine use of steroids in the treatment of infectious mononucleosis No new evidence to support the routine use of steroids in the treatment of infectious mononucleosis | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your (...) username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here No new evidence to support the routine use of steroids in the treatment of infectious mononucleosis Article Text Therapeutics/Prevention Systematic review

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

6. Steroids for symptom control in infectious mononucleosis. (PubMed)

Steroids for symptom control in infectious mononucleosis. Infectious mononucleosis, also known as glandular fever or the kissing disease, is a benign lymphoproliferative disorder. It is a viral infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous herpes virus that is found in all human societies and cultures. Epidemiological studies show that over 95% of adults worldwide have been infected with EBV. Most cases of symptomatic infectious mononucleosis occur between the ages of 15 and 24 (...) years. It is transmitted through close contact with an EBV shedder, contact with infected saliva or, less commonly, through sexual contact, blood transfusions or by sharing utensils; however, transmission actually occurs less than 10% of the time. Precautions are not needed to prevent transmission because of the high percentage of seropositivity for EBV. Infectious mononucleosis is self-limiting and typically lasts for two to three weeks. Nevertheless, symptoms can last for weeks and occasionally

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2015 Cochrane

7. A Validated Scale for Assessing the Severity of Acute Infectious Mononucleosis. (PubMed)

A Validated Scale for Assessing the Severity of Acute Infectious Mononucleosis. To develop a scale for the severity of mononucleosis.One to 5 percent of college students develop infectious mononucleosis annually, and about 10% meet criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) 6 months following infectious mononucleosis. We developed a severity of mononucleosis scale based on a review of the literature. College students were enrolled, generally when they were healthy. When the students developed (...) infectious mononucleosis, an assessment was made as to the severity of their infectious mononucleosis independently by 2 physicians using the severity of mononucleosis scale. This scale was correlated with corticosteroid use and hospitalization. Six months following infectious mononucleosis, an assessment is made for recovery from infectious mononucleosis or meeting 1 or more case definitions of CFS.In total, 126 severity of mononucleosis scales were analyzed. The concordance between the 2 physician

2019 Journal of Pediatrics

8. Cold type autoimmune hemolytic anemia- a rare manifestation of infectious mononucleosis; serum ferritin as an important biomarker. (PubMed)

Cold type autoimmune hemolytic anemia- a rare manifestation of infectious mononucleosis; serum ferritin as an important biomarker. Infectious mononucleosis is one of the main manifestations of Epstein - Barr virus, which is characterized by fever, tonsillar-pharyngitis, lymphadenopathy and atypical lymphocytes. Although 60% of patients with IMN develop cold type antibodies, clinically significant hemolytic anemia with a high ferritin level is very rare and validity of serum ferritin (...) any intervention following two weeks of the acute infection.Cold type autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare manifestation of infectious mononucleosis and serum ferritin is used very rarely as an important biomarker. Management of cold type anemia is mainly supportive and elevated serum ferritin indicates severe viral disease.

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2019 BMC Infectious Diseases

9. Analysis of the Variability of Epstein-Barr Virus Genes in Infectious Mononucleosis: Investigation of the Potential Correlation with Biochemical Parameters of Hepatic Involvement (PubMed)

Analysis of the Variability of Epstein-Barr Virus Genes in Infectious Mononucleosis: Investigation of the Potential Correlation with Biochemical Parameters of Hepatic Involvement Primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is usually asymptomatic, although at times it results in the benign lymphoproliferative disease, infectious mononucleosis (IM), during which almost half of patients develop hepatitis. The aims of the present study are to evaluate polymorphisms of EBV genes circulating in IM

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2016 Journal of medical biochemistry

10. [Clinical effect of pidotimod oral liquid as adjuvant therapy for infectious mononucleosis]. (PubMed)

[Clinical effect of pidotimod oral liquid as adjuvant therapy for infectious mononucleosis]. To study the clinical effect of pidotimod oral liquid as adjuvant therapy for infectious mononucleosis and its effect on T lymphocyte subsets.A total of 76 children with infectious mononucleosis, who were admitted to the hospital between July 2016 and June 2017, were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups: conventional treatment and pidotimod treatment (n=38 each). The children (...) increases in the percentage of CD4+ T cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratio after treatment, which was significantly higher than those in the conventional treatment group (P<0.001). The conventional treatment group had no significant changes in T lymphocyte subsets after treatment (P>0.05).Pidotimod oral liquid has a good clinical effect as the adjuvant therapy for infectious mononucleosis and can improve cellular immune function, so it holds promise for clinical application.

2018 Zhongguo dang dai er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of contemporary pediatrics

11. Does This Patient Have Infectious Mononucleosis?: The Rational Clinical Examination Systematic Review. (PubMed)

Does This Patient Have Infectious Mononucleosis?: The Rational Clinical Examination Systematic Review. Early, accurate diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis can help clinicians target treatment, avoid antibiotics, and provide an accurate prognosis.To systematically review the literature regarding the value of the clinical examination and white blood cell count for the diagnosis of mononucleosis.The databases of PubMed (from 1966-2016) and EMBASE (from 1947-2015) were searched and a total of 670 (...) years, among whom approximately 1 in 13 patients presenting with sore throat has mononucleosis). The likelihood of mononucleosis is reduced with the absence of any lymphadenopathy (summary sensitivity, 0.91; positive LR range, 0.23-0.44), whereas the likelihood increases with the presence of posterior cervical adenopathy (summary specificity, 0.87; positive LR, 3.1 [95% CI, 1.6-5.9]), inguinal or axillary adenopathy (specificity range, 0.82-0.91; positive LR range, 3.0-3.1), palatine petechiae

2016 JAMA

12. Riddle Me This: Acalculous Cholecystitis as an Unusual Complication of Immunoglobulin M Negative Mononucleosis (PubMed)

Riddle Me This: Acalculous Cholecystitis as an Unusual Complication of Immunoglobulin M Negative Mononucleosis Infectious mononucleosis is a common disease of the adolescent caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We present a rare case of a male adult with acalculous cholecystitis due to infectious mononucleosis. A correct diagnosis was challenging due to a false negative antibody test. Laboratory values were significant for a marked lymphocytosis and an early Immunoglobulin G (IgG) response (...) without initial Immunoglobulin M (IgM) elevation. However, IgM antibodies were elevated two weeks later. Symptoms resolved quickly under symptomatic therapy. Antibody level patterns in asplenic patients with infectious mononucleosis are characterized by an atypical course with a delayed rise in IgM antibodies, which complicates the correct diagnosis of an EBV-induced acalculous cholecystitis.

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2018 Cureus

13. Dynamics of Viral and Host Immune Cell MicroRNA Expression during Acute Infectious Mononucleosis (PubMed)

Dynamics of Viral and Host Immune Cell MicroRNA Expression during Acute Infectious Mononucleosis Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the etiological agent of acute infectious mononucleosis (IM). Since acute IM is a self-resolving disease with most patients regaining health in 1-3 weeks there have been few studies examining molecular signatures in early acute stages of the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown, however, to influence immune cell function and consequently the generation of antibody

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2018 Frontiers in microbiology

14. Infectious mononucleosis and hepatic function (PubMed)

Infectious mononucleosis and hepatic function Abnormal hepatic function is common in infectious mononucleosis (IM). However, it remains unknown why increased transferase levels are more common than bilirubin abnormalities in IM. The current study aimed to investigate these associations in the Chinese population. A total of 95 patients with IM (47 males and 48 females) were enrolled in the current study, as well as 95 healthy controls. Patients were sorted by sex. A receiver operating

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2018 Experimental and therapeutic medicine

15. Emergence of Cytomegalovirus Mononucleosis Syndrome Among Young Adults in Hong Kong Linked to Falling Seroprevalence: Results of a 14-Year Seroepidemiological Study (PubMed)

Emergence of Cytomegalovirus Mononucleosis Syndrome Among Young Adults in Hong Kong Linked to Falling Seroprevalence: Results of a 14-Year Seroepidemiological Study Cytomegalovirus (CMV) mononucleosis is a manifestation of primary CMV infection. This study aims to establish the link between long-term population CMV seroepidemiological trends and incidence of CMV mononucleosis requiring hospitalization. Furthermore, by analyzing serial laboratory data of patients hospitalized with CMV (...) mononucleosis, we aim to provide insights into the natural history of this syndrome.We conducted a 14-year observational study in a tertiary hospital in Hong Kong. Cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin G data of 2349 adults were analyzed for trends in CMV susceptibility during the study period. The clinical features, risk factors, antiviral treatment data, and laboratory findings of 25 adult patients presenting with CMV mononucleosis during this period were retrieved.Susceptibility to CMV infection among the adult

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2018 Open forum infectious diseases

16. Fulminant descending mediastinitis secondary to infectious mononucleosis (PubMed)

Fulminant descending mediastinitis secondary to infectious mononucleosis Descending mediastinitis is a rare, life-threatening condition caused by contiguous spread of oropharyngeal or cervical infection into the mediastinum. Infectious mononucleosis generally results in a self-limited illness characterized by fever, pharyngitis and lymphadenopathy. We present an exceptional case of an 18-year-old with infectious mononucleosis complicated by progressive bacterial superinfection and fulminant

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2018 Journal of surgical case reports

17. Mononucleosis: A Possible Cause of Idiopathic Hypersomnia (PubMed)

Mononucleosis: A Possible Cause of Idiopathic Hypersomnia Idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) is a rare central hypersomnia of unknown physiopathology. In this study, we determine if the presence of infectious mononucleosis evaluated by serological markers of Epstein Barr virus infection plays a role in this hypersomnia. Ten patients with a suspicion of IH underwent to clinical assessment, 24 h polysomnography, and serologic testing for mononucleosis including Viral Capside Antigen (VCA) IgG, the VCA (...) IgM, and the EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA). None of the patients reported neurological inflammatory disease and viral infection prior the onset of the disease. Compared to the laboratory serological reference values, all patients had high levels of VCA IgG and EBNA with lower level of VCA IgM, overall indicating past infection. This study shows that prior infectious mononucleosis may predispose some subjects to idiopathic hypersomnia suggesting the role of inflammatory and immunological processes

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2018 Frontiers in neurology

18. How Safe is It to Prescribe Cephalosporins in Patients with Infectious Mononucleosis? Implications for Clinical ENT Practice (PubMed)

How Safe is It to Prescribe Cephalosporins in Patients with Infectious Mononucleosis? Implications for Clinical ENT Practice 30319879 2018 11 14 2149-553X 56 3 2018 Sep Turkish archives of otorhinolaryngology Turk Arch Otorhinolaryngol How Safe is It to Prescribe Cephalosporins in Patients with Infectious Mononucleosis? Implications for Clinical ENT Practice. 183-184 10.5152/tao.2018.3427 Vlastarakos Petros V PV https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2803-1971 Department of Otorhinolaryngology, MITERA

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2018 Turkish Archives of Otorhinolaryngology

19. Fatal Septic Shock in a Patient with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Associated with an Infectious Mononucleosis (PubMed)

Fatal Septic Shock in a Patient with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Associated with an Infectious Mononucleosis The authors describe the case of a young woman who developed a clinical pictures resembling a septic shock-related multiple organ dysfunction syndrome a couple of months after having been diagnosed suffering from a hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with an infectious mononucleosis. Despite the aggressive treatment, which included antibiotics, vasopressors, IV

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2018 Case reports in critical care

20. Splenic Infarction: An Under-recognized Complication of Infectious Mononucleosis? (PubMed)

Splenic Infarction: An Under-recognized Complication of Infectious Mononucleosis? Splenic infarction is a rare complication of infectious mononucleosis. We describe 3 cases of splenic infarction attributed to infectious mononucleosis that we encountered within a 2-month period. We underscore the awareness of this potential complication of infectious mononucleosis and discuss the differential diagnosis of splenic infarction, including infectious etiologies. While symptomatic management (...) is usually sufficient for infectious mononucleosis-associated splenic infarction, close monitoring for other complications, including splenic rupture, is mandated.

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2018 Open forum infectious diseases

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