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141. The Handy Eye Check: a mobile medical application to test visual acuity in children. (PubMed)

The Handy Eye Check: a mobile medical application to test visual acuity in children. To compare visual acuity results obtained with the Handy Eye Chart to results obtained using the Handy Eye Check, a mobile medical application that electronically presents isolated Handy Eye Chart optotypes according the Amblyopia Treatment Study (ATS) protocol.Consecutive patients 6-18 years of age presenting for eye examinations between May 30, 2012, and June 26, 2012, were invited to participate. Monocular (...) visual acuity testing was performed on the subject's poorer-seeing eye using both the Handy Eye Check and the Handy Eye Chart under the same conditions. Visual acuity was first tested using the mobile application, then using the chart, followed by repeated application testing. Patients were excluded if they were unable to undergo the required visual acuity testing or if visual acuity in the worse-seeing eye was less than 20/200 (for validity testing, but not reliability testing).There was a strong

2014 JAAPOS - Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

142. Effectiveness of a Mobile Application as an Adjunct to Medical Advice to Promote Healthy Habits

Effectiveness of a Mobile Application as an Adjunct to Medical Advice to Promote Healthy Habits Effectiveness of a Mobile Application as an Adjunct to Medical Advice to Promote Healthy Habits - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one (...) or more studies before adding more. Effectiveness of a Mobile Application as an Adjunct to Medical Advice to Promote Healthy Habits (AD01) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02308176 Recruitment Status : Unknown Verified January 2017 by Antxon Apiñaniz Fernández de LArrinoa, Basque Health

2014 Clinical Trials

143. How to identify, assess and utilise mobile medical applications in clinical practice. (PubMed)

How to identify, assess and utilise mobile medical applications in clinical practice. There are thousands of medical applications for mobile devices targeting use by healthcare professionals. However, several factors related to the structure of the existing market for medical applications create significant barriers preventing practitioners from effectively identifying mobile medical applications for individual professional use.To define existing market factors relevant to selection of medical (...) applications and describe a framework to empower clinicians to identify, assess and utilise mobile medical applications in their own practice.Resources available on the Internet regarding mobile medical applications, guidelines and published research on mobile medical applications.Mobile application stores (e.g. iTunes, Google Play) are not effective means of identifying mobile medical applications. Users of mobile devices that desire to implement mobile medical applications into practice need to carefully

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2014 International journal of clinical practice

144. Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Meniscal and Articular Cartilage Lesions

Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Meniscal and Articular Cartilage Lesions Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Meniscal and Articular Cartilage Lesions Revision 2018 | Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy ADVERTISEMENT Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy | | | | | > > > Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Meniscal and Articular Cartilage Lesions Revision 2018 Clinical Practice Guidelines Knee Pain and Mobility Impairments: Meniscal and Articular Cartilage Lesions (...) level before and after interventions intended to alleviate the physical impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions associated with meniscus or articular cartilage lesions; however, these have less evidence support about measurement properties. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) or the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) are appropriate general health measures in this population. The Knee Quality of Life 26-item questionnaire (KQoL-26

2018 American Physical Therapy Association

145. Neel Sharma: We need to understand the real life applications of technology in medical education

Neel Sharma: We need to understand the real life applications of technology in medical education Neel Sharma: We need to understand the real life applications of technology in medical education - The BMJ ---> Technology as we all know has caused significant movement in medical education. In reality this was not a desire of our own as doctors, but was brought to us courtesy of the gaining popularity of technology use in everyday lives, from the rise of the internet, mobile devices, laptops (...) preparation. Thousands of questions are available online and hence using these platforms is popular — after all passing exams is essential for progression. There are thousands of apps, but which apps are used in real life and why? One common utilisation as I see it are journal apps which allow for convenient access to evidence based material. Or it may be an app to a popular clinical textbook. For senior doctors the applications in real life working are similar — most likely access to the evidence base

2016 The BMJ Blog

146. Design and Evaluation of a Medication Adherence Application with Communication for Seniors in Independent Living Communities (PubMed)

Design and Evaluation of a Medication Adherence Application with Communication for Seniors in Independent Living Communities Medication non-adherence is a pressing concern among seniors, leading to a lower quality of life and higher healthcare costs. While mobile applications provide a viable medium for medication management, their utility can be limited without tackling the specific needs of seniors and facilitating the active involvement of care providers. To address these limitations, we (...) are developing a tablet-based application designed specifically for seniors to track their medications and a web portal for their care providers to track medication adherence. In collaboration with a local Aging in Place program, we conducted a three-month study with sixteen participants from an independent living facility. Our study found that the application helped participants to effectively track their medications and improved their sense of wellbeing. Our findings highlight the importance of catering

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2017 AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings

147. Smartphone Applications for Educating and Helping Non-motivating Patients Adhere to Medication That Treats Mental Health Conditions: Aims and Functioning (PubMed)

Smartphone Applications for Educating and Helping Non-motivating Patients Adhere to Medication That Treats Mental Health Conditions: Aims and Functioning Background: Patients prescribed with medication that treats mental health conditions benefit the most compared to those prescribed with other types of medication. However, they are also the most difficult to adhere. The development of mobile health (mHealth) applications ("apps") to help patients monitor their adherence is fast growing (...) but with limited evidence on their efficacy. There is no evidence on the content of these apps for patients taking psychotropic medication. The aim of this study is to identify and evaluate the aims and functioning of available apps that are aiming to help and educate patients to adhere to medication that treats mental health conditions. Method: Three platform descriptions (Apple, Google, and Microsoft) were searched between October 2015 and February 2016. Included apps need to focus on adherence to medication

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2017 Frontiers in psychology

148. Implementation of a Smartphone application in medical education: a randomised trial (iSTART) (PubMed)

Double-Blind Method Educational Measurement Female Humans Internal Medicine education Male Mobile Applications Quality Improvement Smartphone statistics & numerical data Internal medicine Medical education Smartphones Student, medical 2016 08 23 2017 09 13 2017 9 20 6 0 2017 9 20 6 0 2018 8 25 6 0 epublish 28923048 10.1186/s12909-017-1010-4 10.1186/s12909-017-1010-4 PMC5604333 BMC Med Educ. 2015 May 21;15:91 25994310 Anesthesiology. 2016 Jan;124(1):186-98 26513023 J Grad Med Educ. 2014 Jun;6(2):199 (...) Implementation of a Smartphone application in medical education: a randomised trial (iSTART) 28923048 2018 08 24 2018 12 02 1472-6920 17 1 2017 Sep 18 BMC medical education BMC Med Educ Implementation of a Smartphone application in medical education: a randomised trial (iSTART). 168 10.1186/s12909-017-1010-4 Martínez Felipe F Departamento de Salud Pública, Escuela de Medicina, Universidad de Valparaíso, Hontaneda, 2664, Valparaíso, Chile. felipe.martinez@uv.cl. Área de Investigación y Estudios

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2017 BMC medical education Controlled trial quality: uncertain

149. Smartphone applications for triaging adults with skin lesions that are suspicious for melanoma. (PubMed)

Smartphone applications for triaging adults with skin lesions that are suspicious for melanoma. Melanoma accounts for a small proportion of all skin cancer cases but is responsible for most skin cancer-related deaths. Early detection and treatment can improve survival. Smartphone applications are readily accessible and potentially offer an instant risk assessment of the likelihood of malignancy so that the right people seek further medical attention from a clinician for more detailed assessment (...) consideration.This review reports on two cohorts of lesions published in two studies. Both studies were at high risk of bias from selective participant recruitment and high rates of non-evaluable images. Concerns about applicability of findings were high due to inclusion only of lesions already selected for excision in a dermatology clinic setting, and image acquisition by clinicians rather than by smartphone app users.We report data for five mobile phone applications and 332 suspicious skin lesions with 86

2018 Cochrane

150. Sway Balance Mobile Application: Reliability, Acclimation, and Baseline Administration. (PubMed)

Sway Balance Mobile Application: Reliability, Acclimation, and Baseline Administration. To describe historic baseline session administration practices, to assess the utility of a practice trial (an acclimation trial) before the official balance session, and to examine the within-session reliability of the Sway Balance Mobile Application (SBMA).Retrospective observational study.Middle schools, high schools, and colleges across the United States.More than 17 000 student-athletes were included (...) in the Sway Medical database with 7968 individuals meeting this study's inclusion criteria.The Sway Medical database included the following subject characteristics for each student-athlete: age, sex, weight, and height.Balance assessment score generated by the SBMA.Variable administration practices with significant differences between baseline session averages across methods were found. Individuals who performed an acclimation trial had a significantly higher baseline session average than those who did

2018 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine

151. Mobile Phone Use Among Medical Residents: A Cross-Sectional Multicenter Survey in Saudi Arabia (PubMed)

platform (55/101, 54.5%), with English the most commonly used language to operate residents' mobile phones (96/100, 96.0%) despite their native language being Arabic. For communication outside medical practice, chatting applications such as WhatsApp matched phone calls as most commonly used tools (each 88/101, 87.1%). These were also the primary tools for medical communication, but used at a lower rate (each 65/101, 64.4%). In medical practice, drug (83/101, 82.2%) and medical (80/101, 79.2 (...) %) references and medical calculation applications (61/101, 60.4%) were the most commonly used. Short battery life (48/92, 52%) was the most common technical difficulty, and distraction at least on a weekly basis (54/92, 58%) was the most likely side effect of using a mobile phone in medical practice. Practically, all participants agreed with the idea of integrating medical staff mobile phones with the hospital information system. Most residents described themselves as self-learners, while half learned from

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2016 JMIR mHealth and uHealth

152. A Mobile Phone Based Medication Reminder Program

the feasibility and acceptability of using mobile applications to improve medication adherence. Participants in the experimental group will receive educational materials and daily reminders through mobile applications. While, participants in the control group will receive only educational materials. After the intervention, interviews will be conducted among participants through phone calls. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Medication Adherence Other: Daily reminders of taking medications (...) Other: Educational materials Not Applicable Detailed Description: The purpose of this study is to improve medication adherence for Chinese patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) by using mobile applications. An exploratory randomized controlled trial (RCT, N=49) and interviews (n=15) will be included in this pilot study. The RCT will compare the effects of the medication adherence (MA, n=24) intervention and control condition (n=25) on the MA score (percent of prescribed antihypertensive drugs

2016 Clinical Trials

153. Cognitive Style and Mobile Technology in E-learning in Undergraduate Medical Education

the efficiency of the instruction of ORL-HNS and understand differences in learning outcomes of M-TEL with various modules of medical education between field dependence and filed independence using this platform. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Medical Education Other: mobile technology of e-learning (M-TEL) Not Applicable Detailed Description: Background: New designs of 6-year undergraduate medical education (UME) mainly include (1) integral curricula of body organ system, (2) multiple (...) tool for the instruction of ORL-HNS and to compare effects of different cognitive styles on learning outcomes of M-TEL with various modules of medical education. Material and Methods: This is a randomized controlled trial. Firstly, we have been setup a e-learning platform of the Top 10 emergent ORL-HNS disorders with translating into an application (APP) function that can execute in mobile devices. Secondly, we will recruit 60 UME students without previous training in ORL-HNS to undergo the Group

2016 Clinical Trials

154. Validation of a Medical Device, a Mobile Spectrofluorimeter, Measuring Skin Autofluorescence in Healthy Volunteers.

photosensitivity of patients who received a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Healthy Volunteers Device: mobile spectrofluorimeter Not Applicable Study Design Go to Layout table for study information Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 32 participants Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Health Services Research Official Title: Validation of a Medical Device, a Mobile (...) Validation of a Medical Device, a Mobile Spectrofluorimeter, Measuring Skin Autofluorescence in Healthy Volunteers. Validation of a Medical Device, a Mobile Spectrofluorimeter, Measuring Skin Autofluorescence in Healthy Volunteers. - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number

2016 Clinical Trials

155. Mobile Health Technology for Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Medication Management

whether our eKidneyCare app with its medication management feature will decrease medication errors and improve patient safety compared to the more traditional way of managing medications. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Renal Insufficiency, Chronic Hypertension Medication Reconciliation Mobile Applications Other: Usual Care Device: Integrated mobile medication app Device: Commercially available mobile medication app Not Applicable Detailed Description: Background: Patients who have (...) they enter and leave the hospital. However, the way that medication reconciliation is currently being done, patients are not actively engaged or given tools to effectively communicate the medications they are taking, changes that have been made, and what they are having trouble with. Directly engaging patients in this process might help solve this problem, and mobile technologies on smartphones may be a solution. Our study team has developed a mobile application (app) called eKidneyCare, which has

2016 Clinical Trials

156. Review of Docphin: An App for Mobile Access to Medical Journals (PubMed)

Review of Docphin: An App for Mobile Access to Medical Journals 27844216 2019 02 12 2019 02 15 1618-727X 30 2 2017 04 Journal of digital imaging J Digit Imaging Review of Docphin: An App for Mobile Access to Medical Journals. 130-132 10.1007/s10278-016-9925-6 Yeung Andy Wai Kan AW 0000-0003-3672-357X Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong. ndyeung@hku.hk. Leung W Keung WK Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong. eng Editorial (...) United States J Digit Imaging 9100529 0897-1889 IM Diagnostic Imaging methods Humans Mobile Applications Periodicals as Topic Quality Control 2016 11 16 6 0 2019 2 13 6 0 2016 11 16 6 0 ppublish 27844216 10.1007/s10278-016-9925-6 10.1007/s10278-016-9925-6 PMC5359210 Neuroimage. 2016 Jul 15;135:214-22 27132544

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2016 Journal of Digital Imaging

157. Locking it down: The privacy and security of mobile medication apps (PubMed)

Locking it down: The privacy and security of mobile medication apps To explore the privacy and security of free medication applications (apps) available to Canadian consumers.The authors searched the Canadian iTunes store for iOS apps and the Canadian Google Play store for Android apps related to medication use and management. Using an Apple iPad Air 2 and a Google Nexus 7 tablet, 2 reviewers generated a list of apps that met the following inclusion criteria: free, available in English (...) , intended for consumer use and related to medication management. Using a standard data collection form, 2 reviewers independently coded each app for the presence/absence of passwords, the storage of personal health information, a privacy statement, encryption, remote wipe and third-party sharing. A Cohen's Kappa statistic was used to measure interrater agreement.Of the 184 apps evaluated, 70.1% had no password protection or sign-in system. Personal information, including name, date of birth and gender

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2016 Canadian Pharmacists Journal : CPJ

158. Mobile Stroke Units for Prehospital Care of Ischemic Stroke

connections to stroke specialists), and have faster access to appropriate treatments, such as medications to break up blood clots in the brain. 3 Mobile stroke units are being investigated as a way to provide earlier care to people who may have suffered a stroke. The Technology A mobile stroke unit is a modified ambulance or custom-built vehicle, resembling a large ambulance, that contains a small CT scanner to provide on-site imaging of patients with suspected stroke. 6-14 Other features of mobile stroke (...) units vary from region to region and include telestroke equipment, point-of-care laboratories, thrombolytic drugs, and standard emergency response equipment, as in a regular ambulance. 6-14 Mobile stroke units also differ from regular ambulances in the way they are staffed. In addition to a paramedic or an emergency medical technician, mobile stroke units may be staffed by neurologists, nurses, radiology or CT technicians, or other health professionals. 6-14 In vehicles in which telestroke equipment

2017 CADTH - Issues in Emerging Health Technologies

159. Mobile apps and sexual risk behaviours among men who have sex with men

Mobile apps and sexual risk behaviours among men who have sex with men RAPID RESPONSE SERVICE | #100, DECEMBER 2015 1 RAPID RESPONSE SERVICE THE ONTARIO HIV TREATMENT NETWORK Questions • What is the impact of mobile applications and internet hook-up sites on risk behaviour associated with HIV/STI transmission and acquisition among men who have sex with men in high income countries? References 1. Grov C, Breslow AS, Newcomb ME, Rosenberger JG, Bauermeister JA. Gay and bisexual men’s use (...) of the Internet: Research from the 1990s through 2013. Journal of Sex Research 2014;51(4):390- 409. 2. Phillips G, Magnus M, Kuo I, Rawls A, Peterson J, Jia Y , et al. Use of geoso- cial networking (GSN) mobile phone applications to find men for sex by men who have sex with men (MSM) in Washington, DC. AIDS and Behavior 2014;18(9):1630-7. 3. Landovitz RJ, Tseng C-H, Weissman M, Haymer M, Mendenhall B, Rogers K, et al. Epidemiology, sexual risk behavior, and HIV prevention practices of men who have sex

2016 Ontario HIV Treatment Network

160. Mobile phone support helps smokers quit

, or online support that was not tailored to the individual. Smoking remains a leading cause of illness and deaths in the UK. Around 20% of adults smoke and two-third of smokers express a desire to quit. NHS Stop Smoking services offer a range of support to people wanting to quit, including mobile phone support. This review lends support to this service. No studies of smartphone applications met inclusion criteria. This would be a valuable area for further study, together with tailored messages (...) replacement therapy, such as patches and tablets; support in person, online or via telephone; and medication such as varenicline. In the UK, 93% of adults own a mobile phone, making them a potentially powerful tool to support smokers who want to quit. This systematic review examined the long-term outcomes of using mobile phones to help people stop smoking. What did this study do? This systematic review and meta-analysis pooled the results of 12 randomised controlled trials of mobile phone based smoking

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

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