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8381. APA Guidelines on Multicultural Education, Training, Research, Practice and Organizational Change for Psychologists

) function within Level 3, the institutional context that considers the influence of local, state, and federal governments; medical systems; legal systems (including law enforcement); mental and behavioral health systems; and educational systems. Level 3 examines the effects of institutional context on how clients and psychologists experience the community, school, and family contexts (Level 2) and how this experience influences both the individual’s self-definition and relationships with one another (...) distinction between standards and guidelines (Reed, McLaughlin, & Newman, 2002; APA, 2015c). Standards are mandates to which all psychologists must adhere (e.g., the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, APA, 2010), whereas guidelines are aspirational and informative regarding practice considerations; APA has indicated that experience and training of professionals also allows for effective interpretation and application of guidelines. Psychologists are encouraged to use

2002 American Psychological Association

8382. The Practical Guide: Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults

of Medicine Graham A. Colditz, M.D., Dr.P .H. Harvard Medical School William H. Dietz, M.D., Ph.D. National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Centers for Disease Control and Prevention John P. Foreyt, Ph.D. Baylor College of Medicine Robert J. Garrison, Ph.D. University of Tennessee, Memphis Scott M. Grundy, M.D., Ph.D. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Barbara C. Hansen, Ph.D. University of Maryland School of Medicine Millicent Higgins, M.D. University (...) of Michigan James O. Hill, Ph.D. University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Barbara V . Howard, Ph.D. Medlantic Research Institute Robert J. Kuczmarski, Dr.P.H., R.D. National Center for Health Statistics Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Shiriki Kumanyika, Ph.D., R.D., M.P.H. The University of Pennsylvania R. Dee Legako, M.D. Prime Care Canyon Park Family Physicians, Inc. T. Elaine Prewitt, Dr.P.H., R.D. Loyola University Medical Center Albert P. Rocchini, M.D. University of Michigan Medical

2000 The Obesity Society

8383. Assessment and Management of Stage I to IV Pressure Ulcers

into opponents, supporters and neutrals (Ontario Public Health Association, 1996). Systematic Review: Application of a rigorous scientific approach to the preparation of a review article (National Health and Medical Research Centre, 1998). Systematic reviews establish where the effects of healthcare are consistent and research results can be applied across populations, settings and differences in treatment (e.g., dose); and where effects may vary significantly. The use of explicit, systematic methods (...) ) Enterostomal Therapist St. Mary’s General Hospital Kitchener, Ontario Rosemary Kohr, RN, PhD, ACNP NP/CNS Medical Care Program London Health Sciences Centre Assistant Professor University of Western Ontario London, Ontario Terri Labate, RN, BScN, CRRN, GCN(C) Nurse Clinician St. Joseph’s Health Care – Parkwood Hospital London, Ontario Fran MacLeod, RN, MScN Advanced Practice Nurse – Wound Care West Park Healthcare Centre Toronto, Ontario Linda Norton, OTReg.(ONT) Occupational Therapist Shoppers Home Health

2002 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

8384. Risk Assessment and Prevention of Pressure Ulcers

with an identified risk for pressure ulcer development, minimize IV pressure through the immediate use of a positioning schedule. 3.2 Use proper positioning, transferring, and turning techniques. Consult Occupational IV Therapy/Physiotherapy (OT/PT) regarding transfer and positioning techniques and devices to reduce friction and shear and to optimize client independence. 3.3a Consider the impact of pain. Pain may decrease mobility and activity. Pain control IV measures may include effective medication (...) not provide reduced interface pressure, therefore they are not considered preventative of tissue breakdown. Fleck (2001) describes the properties of mattress replacements in lieu of standard mattresses. Systematic Review is an application of a rigorous scientific approach to the preparation of a review article (National Health and Medical Research Centre, 1998). Systematic reviews establish where the effects of health care are consistent and research results can be applied across populations, settings

2002 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

8385. Supporting and Strengthening Families Through Expected and Unexpected Life Events

attempt to influence decisions and actions (Baker et al., 1999). Stakeholders include all individuals or groups who will be directly or indirectly affected by the change or solution to the problem. Stakeholders can be of various types, and can be divid- ed into opponents, supporters, and neutrals (Ontario Public Health Association, 1996). Systematic Review: Application of a rigourous scientific approach to the preparation of a review article (National Health and Medical Research Centre, 1998 (...) Susie Blair, RN Staff Nurse The University of Ottawa Health Institute – Cardiac Surgery Ottawa, Ontario Naomi Cornelius, RPN Programs Manager Yorkview Lifecare Centre Toronto, Ontario Margot Jeffrey, RN, BScN Care Coordinator, Child and Family Team Toronto Community Care Access Centre Toronto, Ontario Lianne Jeffs, RN, MSc Chief of Nursing Practice Hamilton Health Sciences McMaster University Medical Centre Site Hamilton, Ontario Judi Kauffman, RN, MSN Patient Care Coordinator Toronto Community Care

2002 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

8386. Prevention of Falls and Fall Injuries in the Older Adult

include all individuals or groups who will be directly or indirectly affected by the change or solution to the problem. Systematic Review: Application of a rigorous scientific approach to the preparation of a review article (National Health and Medical Research Centre, 1998). Systematic reviews establish where the effects of health care are consistent and research results can be applied across populations, settings, and differences in treatment (e.g., dose); and where effects may vary significantly (...) , Ontario The Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging London, Ontario Dr. Jocelyn Charles Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario Council for London Seniors London, Ontario Dr. Richard Crilly Associate Professor, Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario Mary Fox Nurse Manager, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Ontario Pam Holiday Falls and Mobility Network Centre for Studies in Aging, Sunnybrook and Women’s College Health

2002 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

8387. Crisis Intervention

(Caplan, 1964). Systematic Review: Application of a rigorous scientific approach to the preparation of a review article (National Health and Medical Research Centre, 1998). Systematic reviews establish where the effects of health care are consistent and research results can be applied across populations, settings, and differences in treatment (e.g. dose); and where effects may vary significantly. The use of explicit, systematic methods in reviews limits bias (systematic errors) and reduces chance (...) Williams Registered Nurse Law and Mental Health Program Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Toronto, Ontario Members of the Mobile Crisis Response Team Saint Elizabeth Health Care North Y ork, Ontario Members of the Scarborough Mobile Crisis Program Scarborough, Ontario People for Equal Partnership in Mental Health North Bay, Ontario 4 Crisis Intervention Acknowledgement Stakeholders The Registered Nurses Association of Ontario wishes to acknowledge the following individuals and organizations

2002 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

8388. Promoting Continence Using Prompted Voiding

by the change or solution to the problem. Stakeholders can be of various types, and can be divided into opponents, supporters, and neutrals (Ontario Public Health Association, 1996). Systematic Review Application of a rigorous scientific approach to the preparation of a review article (National Health and Medical Research Council, 1998). Systematic reviews establish where the effects of healthcare are consistent and research results can be applied across populations, settings, and differences in treatment (...) , but does not include briefs. Toileting is for the purpose of voiding and not for just changing of briefs. Urinary incontinence is the involuntary loss of urine that is sufficient to be a problem, and may present as any of the following types: Transient incontinence is urine loss resulting from causes outside of or affecting the urinary system such as acute confusion, infection, atrophic urethritis or vaginitis, medications, psychological conditions, restricted mobility or stool impaction. Urge

2002 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

8389. Enhancing Healthy Adolescent Development

categories of nursing professionals. Individual competencies are based on knowledge, skills, attitudes, critical analysis and decision-making, which are enhanced over time by experience and education. It is anticipated that the information contained in this best practice guideline will reinforce the value of initiatives already being implemented and stimulate interest in incorporating additional approaches. Furthermore, it is intended that this guideline will be applicable to all domains of nursing (...) of Nursing Practice, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University Medical Centre Site, Hamilton, Ontario Kelly Kay Deputy Executive Director, Registered Practical Nurses Association of Ontario, Mississauga, Ontario Jean Nesbitt Director, Public Health Nursing and Nutrition, Durham Region Health Department, Whitby, Ontario Irving Rootman Director, Centre for Health Promotion, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Jo Ann Tober Director, Brant Country Health Unit, Brantford, Ontario Stakeholder

2002 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

8390. Provision of anaesthetic services in magnetic resonance units

of Working Party Dr Kate Bullen Council member Dr Juliet Britton British Society of Neuroradiologists Ms Gail Darwent British Association of MR Radiographers Dr Janet DeWilde MagNET Mrs Sharon Giles Department of Health Prof Paul Goddard British Institute of Radiology Dr Susan King Royal College of Radiologists Dr Michael McBrien Consultant Anaesthetist Mrs Pat McDonald Medical Devices Agency Prof David Menon Professor of Anaesthesia Dr John Ridgway Medical Physics Dr Michael Sury Consultant (...) [11] and good communication between anaesthetic and radiological staff is vital. All staff entering the MR unit must be aware of the local rules of that unit, which may be different to those at other MR installations. It is essential that there is a clear protocol that defines roles and responsibilities of all staff in the event of an anaesthetic emergency or resuscitation. All staff must be fully aware of this protocol e.g. the emergency medical resuscitation team should know not to enter

2002 Association of Anaesthetists of GB and Ireland

8391. Angelman syndrome

. Management and treatment Management includes physical, occupational and speech therapy including nonverbal methods of communication. As patients commonly develop seizures at a very young age, anticonvulsant medication is required. Sedative medication can be given in patients with severe sleep disorders. Visual function should also be monitored. Prognosis In adulthood, patients become less active and have a tendency towards obesity. Mobility decreases with joint contractures leading to difficulties (...) : Not applicable or Unknown Age of onset: Infancy ICD-10: Q93.5 OMIM: UMLS: C0162635 MeSH: D017204 GARD: MedDRA: 10049004 Summary Epidemiology Prevalence of AS is estimated to be 1/10,000 to 1/20,000 worldwide. Clinical description Patients with AS appear normal at birth. In the first 6 months of the neonatal period, feeding difficulties and hypotonia may occur, followed by developmental delay between 6 months and 2 years of age. Generally from 1 year of age, the typical features of AS develop: severe

2005 Orphanet

8392. Tungiasis

and peripheral erythema) and chronic inflammation in the feet with itchy/ painful lesions. Bacterial superinfection is common and result in debilitating clinical pathology (deep ulcers, gangrene, lymphangitis and septicemia), leading to impaired physical fitness and mobility. Tungiasis also involves hyperkeratosis, fissuration, nail hypertrophy, and loss of nails. ORPHA:879 Classification level: Disorder Synonym(s): - Prevalence: Unknown Inheritance: Not applicable Age of onset: All ages ICD-10: B88.1 OMIM (...) : - UMLS: C0277356 MeSH: D058285 GARD: MedDRA: - Additional information Further information on this disease Health care resources for this disease Research activities on this disease Specialised Social Services The documents contained in this web site are presented for information purposes only. The material is in no way intended to replace professional medical care by a qualified specialist and should not be used as a basis for diagnosis or treatment. With the support of Our Website does not host any

2005 Orphanet

8393. I am wanting to know what evidence there is of the benefits to follow-up by an Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist, Speech & Language therapist in premature babies.

, such as medical complications or length of stay, and on process-of-care outcomes, such as care-giver or parental satisfaction. Title: Physical activity combined with massage improves bone mineralization in premature infants: a randomized trial [6] Conclusions: A combined massage and physical activity protocol improved bone formation (PICP) but did not affect bone resorption (Pyd). Pyd increased over time in both groups, possibly due to continuous bone resorption and Ca mobilization. Title: Is early (...) benefits of this type of early PT. Title: Effect of oil massage on growth and neurobehavior in very low birth weight preterm neonates [3] Conclusion: Oil application may have a potential to improve weight gain among preterm very low birth weight neonates. Title: Vagal activity, gastric motility, and weight gain in massaged preterm neonates [4] Conclusions: The weight gain experienced by preterm neonates receiving moderate-pressure massage therapy may be mediated by increased vagal activity and gastric

2006 TRIP Answers

8394. How long should you continue warfarin in a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation?

frailty, poor mobility, forgetfulness or poor compliance with medication, concomitant medications (resulting in drug interactions), and frequent falls may jeopardise the benefits from warfarin. These factors are often cited as reasons for non-prescription of warfarin in the elderly, where the absolute benefit is likely to be greatest in view of their high risk.” Most of the guidelines do not discuss ceasing warfarin therapy. The ACC/AHA/ESC practice guidelines on atrial fibrillation states: “ Chronic (...) most from thromboprophylaxis. However, the elderly have more comorbidities and concomitant therapies that may preclude anticoagulant therapy. Also, most of the evidence on thromboprophylaxis has been based on hospital-managed populations and the application to primary care management and anticoagulation monitoring is still uncertain.” “The most devastating complication associated with warfarin prophylaxis is the risk of intracranial haemorrhage, which is a particular problem in the elderly, in whom

2007 TRIP Answers

8395. Comtess - entacapone

of striatal cholinergic activity that accompanies dopamine deficiency; monoamine-oxidase-B inhibitors to inhibit breakdown of dopamine and amantadine, which has shown a modest effect on the Parkinson symptoms. Symptomatic relief is often transient as neuronal loss continues or tolerance may develop. Co-medication with other symptomatic drugs is often given to reduce the dose of the L-dopa, thereby increasing treatment tolerability. The response to L-dopa is generally stable during the initial years (...) of treatment. However, due to the progressive degeneration of the DA system, the neuronal buffer capacity is believed to be reduced. At that stage, the patient may switch within seconds from a state of relatively good mobility to one of severe parkinsonism, giving rise to the term “ON-OFF” phenomenon. This end-of-dose deterioration implies a shortening of the duration of action of L-dopa. OFF periods tend to become longer and to set in abruptly. ON periods are often combined with dyskinesias and/or other

2005 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

8396. Comtan - entacapone

of striatal cholinergic activity that accompanies dopamine deficiency; monoamine-oxidase-B inhibitors to inhibit breakdown of dopamine and amantadine, which has shown a modest effect on the Parkinson symptoms. Symptomatic relief is often transient as neuronal loss continues or tolerance may develop. Co-medication with other symptomatic drugs is often given to reduce the dose of the L-dopa, thereby increasing treatment tolerability. The response to L-dopa is generally stable during the initial years (...) of treatment. However, due to the progressive degeneration of the DA system, the neuronal buffer capacity is believed to be reduced. At that stage, the patient may switch within seconds from a state of relatively good mobility to one of severe parkinsonism, giving rise to the term “ON-OFF” phenomenon. This end-of-dose deterioration implies a shortening of the duration of action of L-dopa. OFF periods tend to become longer and to set in abruptly. ON periods are often combined with dyskinesias and/or other

2005 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

8397. Botulinum Toxin in Poststroke Spasticity (PubMed)

Botulinum Toxin in Poststroke Spasticity Poststroke hemiparesis, together with abnormal muscle tone, is a major cause of morbidity and disability. Although most hemiparetic patients are able to reach different ambulatory levels with rehabilitation efforts, upper and lower limb spasticity can impede activities of daily living, personal hygiene, ambulation and, in some cases, functional improvement. The goals of spasticity management include increasing mobility and range of motion, attaining (...) better hygiene, improving splint wear and other functional activities. Conservative measures, such as positioning, stretching and exercise are essential in spasticity management, but alone often are inadequate to effectively control it. Oral antispastic medications often provide limited effects with short duration and frequent unwanted systemic side effects, such as weakness, sedation and dry mouth. Therefore, neuromuscular blockade by local injections have become the first choice for the treatment

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2007 Clinical Medicine and Research

8398. Safety and Efficacy of GW786034 (Pazopanib) In Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

) Questionnaire at Weeks 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 [ Time Frame: Baseline and Weeks 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 ] The EQ-5D is comprised of a 5-item health status measure and a visual analogue rating scale, and measures mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain, discomfort, and anxiety/depression. Responses to each of the 5 health states are measured on a 3-point scale (no, moderate, and extreme problems). Scoring of the EQ-5D yields an index-based summary score (Index), through application of societal weights (...) , and a VAS score (VAS). Index is interpreted on a continuum from 1.0 (best possible health) to 0 (represents dead), to some health sates being worse than dead (<0). Adjusted Mean Change From Baseline in the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) Score of the EQ-5D (EuroQoL [Quality of Life]-5D) Questionnaire at Weeks 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 [ Time Frame: Baseline and Weeks 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 ] The EQ-5D is comprised of a 5-item health status measure and a visual analogue rating scale, and measures mobility, self

2006 Clinical Trials

8399. Treadmill Training in Chronic MS: Efficacy and Cost-effectiveness

, Older Adult Sexes Eligible for Study: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Chronic definite multiple sclerosis Visible paraparetic gait deficits EDSS 4 to 6.5 Last 12 months of care in VHS Competent to provide consent and carry out study procedures Pass the Functional Mobility Entry Test Exclusion Criteria: Performing 20 minutes or more of aerobic exercise 3X per week Alcohol consumption over 2 oz liquor, 8 oz wine, 24 oz beer per day Cardiac history Significant medical (...) by (Responsible Party): VA Office of Research and Development ( US Department of Veterans Affairs ) Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: The purpose of the study is to determine whether treadmill training is safe and beneficial in patients with walking difficulty because of multiple sclerosis. Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Multiple Sclerosis Behavioral: Exercise Not Applicable Detailed Description: Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease

2006 Clinical Trials

8400. CD8+ T Cell Depletion for GVHD Prophylaxis After Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

ALL CML Multiple Myeloma NHL Hodgkin's Lymphoma Device: CD+8 T cell depletion Not Applicable Detailed Description: The patient will be admitted to the hospital once a good donor is found for chemotherapy and stem cell transplant. The patient will remain in the hospital for 8 days and will receive two chemotherapy drugs (fludarabine and Busulfex) intravenously once each day for 4 days. On the third day after the patient has finished chemotherapy, the donor cells should arrive at Dana-Farber Cancer (...) Library of Medicine related topics: resources: Arms and Interventions Go to Intervention Details: Device: CD+8 T cell depletion CD8 depleted product Given through central line after treatment with fludarabine and busulfex intravenously for 4 days Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : To assess the initial engraftment of HLA matched unrelated donor mobilized peripheral blood stem cells depleted of CD+8 cells. [ Time Frame: 2 years ] Secondary Outcome Measures : To assess sustained

2006 Clinical Trials

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