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8361. Nurse entrepreneurs - turning initiative into independence

position in the market 4 – How to trade: legal form of business 8 – Franchises 10 – Choosing the right equipment 13 4Money matters 14 – Accountants, tax, insurance and pensions 14 – RCN indemnity insurance cover 15 – Financing your business 16 – Using your own money 16 – Charges and fees 19 – Negotiating payment 20 – Payment and invoicing 20 5 Some business opportunities 22 – Aero-medical in-flight nursing 22 – Education and training 22 – Management 23 – Primary health care 24 – Podiatry 24 – Research (...) their cars, and is it accessible for people with disabilities? ? Providing refreshments, reading materials and toys for children can make a good first impression for clients. If you are using your home as your practice base, think about how your family and your clients will cope with each other’s presence and how you will deal with distractions ? If you are practising in the community, making sure clients can reach you is vital. Mobile phones, voicemail services or answering machines, plus email

2007 Royal College of Nursing

8362. Clinical practice guideline: The use of pressure-relieving devices (beds, mattresses and overlays) for the prevention of pressure ulcers in primary and secondary care

, an individual's potential to develop pressure ulcers may be influenced by the following intrinsic risk factors: ? reduced mobility or immobility ? sensory impairment ? acute illness ? level of consciousness ? extremes of age ? previous history of pressure damage ? vascular disease ? severe chronic or terminal illness ? malnutrition. Extrinsic factors include pressure, shearing, friction, medication, and moisture to the skin. 3.4 What are pressure-relieving devices? There are two main approaches to preventing (...) Institute Stakeholder involvement The following stakeholders commented on draft versions of these guidelines: 3M Healthcare Ltd Abbott Laboratories Ltd All W ales Medical and Pharmaceutical Advisers Forum Ambulance Service Association British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (BAPEN) British Association of Plastic Surgeons British Association for Prosthetists and Orthotists British Dietetic Association British Geriatrics Society British Medical Association – Hospital Doctors Secretariat

2007 Royal College of Nursing

8363. Guidance for mentors of student nurses and midwives. An RCN toolkit

students with a wide variety or impairments and disabilities. Some of the more common include: ? dyslexia and/or dyscalculia ? epilepsy ? hearing or visual impairments ? progressive medical conditions ? mental health conditions ? physical disability and/or restricted mobility. The legal framework The Disability Discrimination Act (1995) This groundbreaking legislation outlawed discrimination against disabled people for the first time. With a primary focus on employment and access to good services (...) for at least one year before taking on this role. 4 GU IDA NCE FO R M E NTO RS ROYA L C OLL E G E OF N U RS I N G 5 2 The role of mentor As a mentor you are required to offer the student support and guidance in the practice area. Your role is to enable the student to make sense of their practice through: ? the application of theory ? assessing, evaluating and giving constructive feedback ? facilitating reflection on practice, performance and experiences. All mentors, and others involved in supporting

2005 Royal College of Nursing

8364. Ankle sprains in the paediatric athlete

% and foot x-rays by 29% . The Ottawa ankle rules An ankle x-ray series is only necessary if there is pain in the malleolar zone and any of the following: Bone tenderness at the posterior edge or tip of the lateral malleolus, or Bone tenderness at the posterior edge or tip of the medical malleolus, or Inability to weight bear both immediately and in the emergency department A foot x-ray series is only necessary if there is pain in the midfoot zone and any of the following: Bone tenderness at base (...) of immobilization . In fact, a 20% decline in strength has been shown for each week of immobilization . Functional bracing, with early mobilization, provides support and stability, allowing for earlier improvements in range of motion, earlier return to sport, and higher patient satisfaction when compared with immobilization . Rigid lateral stirrups may be used acutely. When returning to sport, a functional brace such as a lace-up ankle brace should be worn for the first three to six months to protect the ankle

2007 Canadian Paediatric Society

8365. Physical activity for people with cardiovascular disease: recommendations of the National Heart Foundation of Australia

Physical activity for people with cardiovascular disease: recommendations of the National Heart Foundation of Australia Physical activity for people with cardiovascular disease: recommendations of the National Heart Foundation of Australia | The Medical Journal of Australia mja-search search Use the for more specific terms. Title contains Body contains Date range from Date range to Article type Author's surname Volume First page doi: 10.5694/mja__.______ Search Reset  close Individual Login (...) muscle fitness and, for survivors of acute myocardial infarction, lower mortality. The greatest potential for benefit is in those people who were least active before beginning regular physical activity, and this benefit may be achieved even at relatively low levels of physical activity. Medical practitioners should routinely provide brief, appropriate advice on physical activity to people with well-compensated, clinically stable cardiovascular disease. Background and evidence base for recommendations

2006 MJA Clinical Guidelines

8366. Hypertension in Pregnancy

concentration (20 U/500 ml N/s or Ringers) and the volume of fluid included in the total input. Oliguria at this point should not precipitate any specific intervention except to lower thresholds for considering early delivery. As these women are at high risk of Caesarean section, oral fluids should also be limited. • Oxygen saturation should be measured continuously and charted with blood pressure. If saturation falls below 95% then medical review is essential. 1. Initially check BP manually and compare (...) • Unfractionated heparin 5000 IU sc twice daily (bid) should be given until the woman is fully mobile. A prophylactic dose of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) can be used postpartum. 19,20 • Many clinicians do not see the use of unfractionated heparin as a contraindication to the insertion of an epidural, providing there is no evidence of a coagulopathy. Ideally the epidural would be inserted 1 hour prior to the next dose of unfractionated heparin, as there is a subset of patient who become therapeutically

2006 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

8367. Medical Reports - Dealing with Requests

of support for exemption from jury service Illness as grounds for entitlement Exemptions from paying medical and maternity prescriptions (FP92A, FW8) Housing letters Social security letters Forms related to disabled parking badges Forms for disability and mobility allowance War pensions Holiday insurance cancellation or curtailment Accounts of medical events for civil proceedings Fitness to engage in a particular occupation or profession Health Professions Council PCV and LGV licences Taxi driver Summer (...) not want divulged. [ ] A common format for General Practitioner Report (GPR) has been agreed and computer-generated reports (eGPR) are accepted by insurers. Many GP software programs now have the facility to generate reports from within their systems, merging all relevant patient data. It is, however, still necessary for the GP to check that the data are complete and accurate before submitting the report. Non-medical reports Countersigning passport applications and confirming identity are examples

2008 Mentor

8368. Improving outcomes in breast cancer

/nhsplan-e.pdf 3. A Policy Framework for Commissioning Cancer Services: A Report by the Expert Advisory Group on Cancer to the Chief Medical Officers of England and Wales (1995). Available from: http://www.doh.gov.uk/cancer/pdfs/calman-hine.pdf Related NICE publications: Completed appraisals • National Institute for Clinical Excellence (2001) Guidance on the use of taxanes for the treatment of breast cancer. NICE Technology Appraisal Guidance No. 30. London: National Institute for Clinical Excellence (...) on Medical and Population Subjects no.66. The Stationery Office: London 2001. Country No of Incidence: No of deaths Mortality: registrations crude rate per (2000) crude rate per (1998)100,000 100,000 (1998) (2000) England 32,908 131.0 10,609 41.9 Wales 1,914 128.05 731 48.7particularly apparent among women aged 50-64; this is believed to be primarily due to earlier detection through the breast screening programme set up in 1988. Figure 1. Age-specific incidence of breast cancer, England and Wales, 1997

2002 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

8369. Clinical practice guidelines for the psychosocial care of adults with cancer

Email: directorate@nbcc.org.au These guidelines were approved by the National Health and Medical Research Council at its 147th Session on 10 April 2003, under section 14A of the National Health and Medical Research Council Act 1992.Approval for the guidelines by NHMRC is granted for a period not exceeding five years, at which date the approval expires.The NHMRC expects that all guidelines will be reviewed no less than once every five years. Readers should check with the National Breast Cancer Centre (...) for any reviews or updates of these guidelines. The strategic intent of the NHMRC is to provide leadership and work with other relevant organisations to improve the health of all Australians by: • fostering and supporting a high quality and internationally recognised research base; • providing evidence based advice; • applying research evidence to health issues thus translating research into better health practice and outcomes; and • promoting informed debate on health and medical research, health

2003 National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre

8371. Tackling inequalities through the social determinants of health: Building the evidence base

were greater for adults and female youth than for young males. Acevedo-Garcia et al’s (2004) review examined a wider range of housing mobility policies with a closer focus on health outcomes; [10] like the previous review, it examined housing mobility, but also included housing policy for the mentally ill. Their conclusions were that housing mobility policies (at least in the US) result in improvements in health and health behaviours, though the number of studies is small. They concluded (...) that housing mobility policies (at least in the US) do improve health and health behaviours, though research on the mechanisms is required. General housing improvement is also associated with positive change in social outcomes – such as reductions in fear of crime, and improvements in social and community outcomes (social participation), but where evidence on the effects on health is presented the effects are small. Although housing improvement often takes place within the context of regeneration

2007 Public Health Research Consortium

8372. National tobacco control policies: do they have a differential social impact?

by grants from the U.S. National Cancer Institute/NIH (from the Roswell Park Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center (TTURC), P50 CA111236, and from R01 CA100362), the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (#57897), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (#045734), the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (#265903), Cancer Research UK (#C312/A3726), the Australian Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing, the Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation of the National (...) across the four countries over the study period UK CA US AU 2002 2003 2004 2005 TV Radio Movie - Billboards Newspapers/mags - - Advertising Store - - Sports - - - Sponsorship Arts - - - Free samples - Special price - - - Gift/discount - E-mail - - Mobile phone - - Direct mail - - Branded clothing - - - Competitions - - Internet sites - - Leaflets - - Promotions Signs - - - ( = complete ban , = partial

2006 Public Health Research Consortium

8373. Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery for intra-abdominal surgery: a systematic review

into larger trials. NOTES procedures and studies should be performed under strict guidelines, such as the membership criteria developed by NOSCAR. - ASERNIP-S REVIEW OF NATURAL ORIFICE TRANSLUMENAL ENDOSCOPIC SURGERY (NOTES) TM FOR INTRA- ABDOMINAL SURGERY – JULY 2007 - vi Important note The information contained in this report is a distillation of the best available evidence located at the time the searches were completed as stated in the protocol. Please consult with your medical practitioner if you (...) - ABDOMINAL SURGERY – JULY 2007 - ix The ASERNIP-S Review Group ASERNIP-S Director Professor Guy Maddern, FRACS ASERNIP-S Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Stepney SA 5069 Protocol Surgeon Dr Ian J Martin, FRACS Wesley Medical Centre Auchenflower Brisbane 4066 Advisory Surgeons Mr Thomas Graham Wilson, FRACS Consultant Surgeon Flinders Medical Centre Bedford Park SA 5041 Mr Nicholas O’Rourke, FRACS Royal Brisbane Hospital Brisbane QLD 4001 ASERNIP-S Researcher Ms Eliana Della Flora ASERNIP-S Royal

2007 ASERNIP-S

8374. Assault/Abuse - safeguarding children

sexual activities, or encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways. Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and / or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. It may involve a parent or carer failing to provide Neglect adequate food, shelter and clothing, failing to protect a child from physical harm or danger, or the failure to ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It may also (...) needs because of a psychological or medical dif?culty. For example, deaf or autistic children may demonstrate challenging behaviour, which may or may not be as a result of abuse. Children with special needs are more likely to be abused than children in the general population. Children in need Children who are de?ned as being ‘in need’ are those whose vulnerability is such that they are unlikely to reach or maintain a satisfactory level of health or development, or their health and development

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

8375. Trauma - neck and back trauma

no randomised controlled trials comparing out of hospital spinal immobilisation techniques 1 : ? soft collars do not limit movement 2,3 ? there is variable difference between the various types of semi-rigid collars 2-4 ? addition of side supports and tapes increases immobilisation 2,3 ? combining collar with extrication board improves immobilisation 5 ? the application of devices is more important than the variation of devices 6 ? neutral position needs slight ?exion of the neck and the occiput should (...) should have manual immobilisation commenced at the earliest time, whilst initial assessment is undertaken. HISTORY It is vital to determine the mechanism of injury in order to understand the forces involved in causing the injury including: hyper?exion, hyperextension, rotation and compression and combinations of all the above. Injury most frequently occurs at junctions of mobile and ?xed sections of the spine. Hence fractures are more commonly seen in the lower cervical vertebrae where the cervical

2007 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

8376. Evaluation of the Uptake of Advice, Directives and Guidelines to the NHS Concerning Patient Safety by the SABS System

Action 29 th July 2004 Patient Safety Alert 03 Safe delivery of radiotherapy DH Action 23 rd December 2004 None Reduction of risks associated with mobile food trolleys DH Estates and Facilities Action 17 th August 2005 DH (2005) 11 Reduction of risk associated with problems with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) MHRA medical device alert Action and updates Multiple in 2005 & 2006 Numerous (10) Reduction of harm caused by misplaced nasogastric feeding tubes NPSA Immediate action 21 st (...) not necessarily reach all levels of an organisation and for many front line staff, paper copies of alerts or the resulting policies and procedures were available in folders, for example on wards . Findings: management of alerts It was striking how differently senior staff viewed the need to be aware of those alerts (particularly those from the NPSA) which required changes in nursing and medical practice. A small number of senior managers clearly stated that the management of safety alerts was not at the top

2007 York Health Economics Consortium

8377. Intermediate care - Hospital at Home in COPD

service evaluation which were applicable to admission avoidance for patients with exacerbations of COPD, and one RCT related to early supported discharge. The evidence statements can be summarised as follows: N There were no significant differences in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ), 3–5 re- admission rates, 3–6 mortality 4–6 or number of days in care 5 between HaH and hospital care. N Two studies showed no difference between the groups for health status, 34 but a Spanish study showed (...) in deciding which patients can be managed at home. Since they have repeatedly shown no increase in admission/readmission rates, it is likely that their criteria for managing at home are safe. The least restrictive set of absolute criteria for admission which were used in three studies 367 were impaired level of consciousness, acute confusion, pH ,7.35, acute changes on the chest radiograph, a concomitant medical problem requiring inpatient stay, insufficient social support, no telephone and residence

2007 British Thoracic Society

8378. Safeguarding children

sexual activities, or encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways. Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and / or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. It may involve a parent or carer failing to provide Neglect adequate food, shelter and clothing, failing to protect a child from physical harm or danger, or the failure to ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It may also (...) needs because of a psychological or medical dif?culty. For example, deaf or autistic children may demonstrate challenging behaviour, which may or may not be as a result of abuse. Children with special needs are more likely to be abused than children in the general population. Children in need Children who are de?ned as being ‘in need’ are those whose vulnerability is such that they are unlikely to reach or maintain a satisfactory level of health or development, or their health and development

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

8379. Neck and back trauma

no randomised controlled trials comparing out of hospital spinal immobilisation techniques 1 : ? soft collars do not limit movement 2,3 ? there is variable difference between the various types of semi-rigid collars 2-4 ? addition of side supports and tapes increases immobilisation 2,3 ? combining collar with extrication board improves immobilisation 5 ? the application of devices is more important than the variation of devices 6 ? neutral position needs slight ?exion of the neck and the occiput should (...) should have manual immobilisation commenced at the earliest time, whilst initial assessment is undertaken. HISTORY It is vital to determine the mechanism of injury in order to understand the forces involved in causing the injury including: hyper?exion, hyperextension, rotation and compression and combinations of all the above. Injury most frequently occurs at junctions of mobile and ?xed sections of the spine. Hence fractures are more commonly seen in the lower cervical vertebrae where the cervical

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

8380. Evidence Based Research: Effectiveness of Grabrail Orientations During the Sit-to-Stand Transfer

of Statistics, 2005). The increase in the older population is due primarily to an increased life expectancy in combination with a decreased fertility rate. Concurrent with the ageing process, bodily changes may affect an older person’s functional performance such as mobility and self care. For example, the ageing process has been linked to a generalised decrease in muscle strength and joint range of motion, especially at the hip, knee and spine, as well as difficulties with proprioception and balance which (...) (Allied and Complementary Medicine) AMI: Australasian Medical Index ARCH: Australian Architecture Database AVE: Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals CINAHL (Nursing and Allied Health) Compendex Plus Current Contents Dissertation abstracts Expanded Academic Index ASAP Medline OSH-ROM ProQuest 5000 PsycINFO PubMed Science Direct University of Sydney Theses Web of Science WWW via the Google and Google Scholar Search engine Legislative and Regulatory Documents $ # The following

2006 Home Modification Information Clearinghouse

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