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Microdermabrasion

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101. Safety and Efficacy Study of Photodynamic Therapy With Levulan Kerastick + Blue Light for Actinic Keratoses on the Upper Extremities

%), alpha hydroxyacids [e.g.glycolic acid, lactic acid, etc. greater than 5%], salicylic acid (greater than 2%) within 2 days of initiation of treatment. Cryotherapy within 2 weeks of initiation of treatment Retinoids, including tazarotene, adapalene, tretinoin, within 4 weeks of initiation of treatment. Microdermabrasion, laser ablative treatments, ALA-PDT, chemical peels, 5-FU, diclofenac, ingenol mebutate, imiquimod or other topical treatments for AK within 8 weeks of initiation of treatment. use

2014 Clinical Trials

102. Ultherapy® for the Treatment of Acne Scars

of systemic granulomatous diseases active or inactive or connective tissue disease. Have hypertrophic acne scars, any evidence of keloid scarring, predominantly icepick scarring (defined as more than half of all scar area in either the left or right or treatment area) or sinus tract scars. Presence of a metal stent or implant in the area(s) to be treated. Inability to understand protocol or give informed consent. Microdermabrasion or glycolic acid peels to the treatment area(s) within four weeks prior

2014 Clinical Trials

103. Ultherapy® for the Treatment of Erythematotelangiectatic Rosacea

interfere with assessing results in areas to be treated. Open wounds or lesions in the area(s) to be treated. Acne. Active implants (e.g., pacemakers or defibrillators), or metallic implants in the treatment areas (dental implants not included.) Inability to understand the protocol or to give informed consent. Microdermabrasion or glycolic acid peels to the treatment areas within four weeks prior to study participation or during the study. Marked asymmetry, ptosis, excessive dermatochalasis, deep dermal

2014 Clinical Trials

104. MUSE Study of Levulan Kerastick

than 2%) within 2 days of initiation of treatment Cryotherapy within 2 weeks of initiation of treatment Retinoids, including tazarotene, adapalene, tretinoin, retinol, within 4 weeks of initiation of treatment Microdermabrasion, laser ablative treatments, ALA-PDT, chemical peels, 5-FU, diclofenac, imiquimod or other topical treatments for AK within 8 weeks of initiation of treatment use of systemic retinoid therapy within 6 months of initiation of treatment Contacts and Locations Go to Information

2014 Clinical Trials

105. A Safety and Efficacy Study of OnabotulinumtoxinA in Upper Facial Rhytides

, microdermabrasion, or superficial peels in the past 3 months Any medium depth or deep depth facial chemical peels; facial skin resurfacing; or permanent facial make-up in the past 6 months Any nonpermanent soft tissue fillers, or treatment with oral retinoids in the past year - Prior face lift, thread lift, eyebrow lift, or related procedures (eg, eyelid and/or eyebrow surgery) Prior facial treatment with permanent soft tissue fillers, synthetic implants (eg, Gore-Tex®), and/or fat transplantation Contacts

2014 Clinical Trials

106. A Safety and Efficacy Study of OnabotulinumtoxinA in Forehead and Glabellar Facial Rhytides

syndrome, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Any facial resurfacing laser or light treatment, microdermabrasion, or superficial peels in the past 3 months Any medium depth or deep depth facial chemical peels; facial skin resurfacing; or permanent facial make-up in the past 6 months Any nonpermanent soft tissue fillers, or treatment with oral retinoids in the past year Prior face lift, thread lift, eyebrow lift, or related procedures (eg, eyelid and/or eyebrow surgery) Prior facial treatment

2014 Clinical Trials

107. Safety and Efficacy of Azzalure/Dysport, Restylane/Emervel Filler and Restylane Skinbooster Treatment

, microdermabrasion, retinoids within the last 6 months. Any aesthetic surgery of the face. Permanent implant or aesthetic treatment with non-HA or non-collagen products in the face. History of severe keloids and/or hypertrophic scars. Neuromuscular junctional disorders (e.g. myasthenia gravis, Eaton Lambert syndrome or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) or history of dysphagia and aspiration. Known hypersensitivity to hyaluronic acid, botulinum toxin, lidocaine hydrochloride or other amide-type anesthetics. History

2014 Clinical Trials

108. Safety and Efficacy of Treatment With Azzalure, Restylane/Emervel Filler and Restylane Skinbooster

, such as infection, psoriasis and herpes zoster/herpes simplex near or on the areas to be treated. Cancerous or pre-cancerous lesions in the areas to be treated. Facial tissue augmenting therapy or revitalization treatment with hyaluronic acid (HA) or collagen, or botulinum toxin treatment during the last 12 months. Procedures or treatments inducing an active dermal response such as laser, Intense Pulsed Light, chemical peeling, microdermabrasion, retinoids within the last 6 months. Any aesthetic surgery

2014 Clinical Trials

109. Scar Revision (Diagnosis)

. Previous Next: Contraindications Cigarette smoking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin E, and isotretinoin should be stopped at the appropriate time prior to revision, or the patient should be counseled that suboptimal outcomes may result. Noninvasive or minimally invasive measures such as microdermabrasion and intralesional steroid injection can be performed as early as 3 weeks after revision of the scar, but many practitioners prefer to wait 6 weeks. When undertaking a revision, subtle

2014 eMedicine.com

110. Chemical Peels (Overview)

of this technique by those already discussed. Microdermabrasion is currently a popular technique because no downtime or discomfort is associated with the procedure. Medical devices tend to have stronger suction, and more abrasive crystals are used, while spa and lay devices tend to be gentler, with less overall effect but increased safety. In general, mechanical abrasion tends to improve scarring more than chemical peeling agents, given similar depth of penetration. [ ] Currently, a number of categories

2014 eMedicine.com

111. Scar Revision (Treatment)

. Previous Next: Contraindications Cigarette smoking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin E, and isotretinoin should be stopped at the appropriate time prior to revision, or the patient should be counseled that suboptimal outcomes may result. Noninvasive or minimally invasive measures such as microdermabrasion and intralesional steroid injection can be performed as early as 3 weeks after revision of the scar, but many practitioners prefer to wait 6 weeks. When undertaking a revision, subtle

2014 eMedicine.com

112. Keratosis Pilaris (Treatment)

and physical treatments, such as manual extraction of white heads (termed acne surgery), microdermabrasion, and chemical peels. In-office, physician-performed treatments such as chemical peels; dermabrasion; microdermabrasion; photodynamic therapy; and blue-light, laser, and intense pulsed light devices may be helpful as adjunctive treatment. Because keratosis pilaris has no cure and no universally effective treatment is available, proceed with caution using a combination of in-office treatments (...) and a physician-directed home maintenance skin care routine. In-office treatments include the following: Chemical peels Extraction of keratin plugs or trapped coiled hairs Vacubrasion (uses vacuum suction and synthetic diamond abrasion) Microdermabrasion Photodynamic therapy Blue-light Laser Intense pulsed light Case reports in the literature have described effective keratosis pilaris treatment with modalities such as the 595-nm pulsed dye laser, intense pulsed light devices, and various other laser devices

2014 eMedicine.com

113. Nonablative Resurfacing (Treatment)

, and microdermabrasion, are used. Ongoing treatment is to be expected. In a 2010 literature review, Tierney and Hanke found 10 studies that reported histologic evidence of cutaneous repair of photodamaged skin with the use of combination treatments to treat photoaging; reported treatments included nonablative and ablative laser resurfacing, topical retinoids, and topical photosensizers with lasers and light sources. [ ] Previous Next: Future and Controversies Nonablative or subsurface remodeling represents

2014 eMedicine.com

114. Postinflammatory Hyperpigmentation (Overview)

the skin such as infections, allergic reactions, mechanical injuries, reactions to medications, phototoxic eruptions, trauma (eg, burns), and inflammatory diseases (eg, , , ). Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation can also be seen following treatment with a number of electromagnetic devices such as ultrasound, radiofrequency, lasers, light-emitting diodes, and visible light, as well as secondary to microdermabrasion. Typically, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation is most severe in patients whose basal cell

2014 eMedicine.com

115. Scar Revision (Overview)

. Previous Next: Contraindications Cigarette smoking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin E, and isotretinoin should be stopped at the appropriate time prior to revision, or the patient should be counseled that suboptimal outcomes may result. Noninvasive or minimally invasive measures such as microdermabrasion and intralesional steroid injection can be performed as early as 3 weeks after revision of the scar, but many practitioners prefer to wait 6 weeks. When undertaking a revision, subtle

2014 eMedicine.com

116. Keratosis Pilaris (Follow-up)

and physical treatments, such as manual extraction of white heads (termed acne surgery), microdermabrasion, and chemical peels. In-office, physician-performed treatments such as chemical peels; dermabrasion; microdermabrasion; photodynamic therapy; and blue-light, laser, and intense pulsed light devices may be helpful as adjunctive treatment. Because keratosis pilaris has no cure and no universally effective treatment is available, proceed with caution using a combination of in-office treatments (...) and a physician-directed home maintenance skin care routine. In-office treatments include the following: Chemical peels Extraction of keratin plugs or trapped coiled hairs Vacubrasion (uses vacuum suction and synthetic diamond abrasion) Microdermabrasion Photodynamic therapy Blue-light Laser Intense pulsed light Case reports in the literature have described effective keratosis pilaris treatment with modalities such as the 595-nm pulsed dye laser, intense pulsed light devices, and various other laser devices

2014 eMedicine.com

117. Scar Revision (Follow-up)

. Previous Next: Contraindications Cigarette smoking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin E, and isotretinoin should be stopped at the appropriate time prior to revision, or the patient should be counseled that suboptimal outcomes may result. Noninvasive or minimally invasive measures such as microdermabrasion and intralesional steroid injection can be performed as early as 3 weeks after revision of the scar, but many practitioners prefer to wait 6 weeks. When undertaking a revision, subtle

2014 eMedicine.com

118. Nonablative Resurfacing (Follow-up)

, and microdermabrasion, are used. Ongoing treatment is to be expected. In a 2010 literature review, Tierney and Hanke found 10 studies that reported histologic evidence of cutaneous repair of photodamaged skin with the use of combination treatments to treat photoaging; reported treatments included nonablative and ablative laser resurfacing, topical retinoids, and topical photosensizers with lasers and light sources. [ ] Previous Next: Future and Controversies Nonablative or subsurface remodeling represents

2014 eMedicine.com

119. Facelift, SMAS Plication

, and ultrasound. The understanding of facelifts has evolved to include the realization that tissue elevation and resuspension or support of the deeper tissue layers (ie, those beneath the skin) are essential in obtaining significant and lasting changes. However, even the latest facelift surgery cannot reduce all rhytides. Supplemental treatments of the more superficial aspects of the skin often are required. These can be in the form of , , microdermabrasion, filler substances including autogenous, homogenous

2014 eMedicine Surgery

120. Facial Analysis for Skin Resurfacing

(PCDS) (www.pcds.org.uk). Detailed diagram of the skin. Courtesy of Wikispaces (https://showmesomeskin.wikispaces.com/Dermis). The term resurfacing was most often used in conjunction with use of the carbon dioxide laser, then the erbium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser, and, subsequently, fractionated lasers. [ ] Technically, chemical peels, dermabrasion, and, to a lesser extent, microdermabrasion, among other treatments, could also be considered resurfacing. Current terminology encompassing

2014 eMedicine Surgery

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