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Metabolic Syndrome

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21. The Association Between the Metabolic Syndrome and Metabolic Syndrome Score and Urine Microalbumin/Urine Creatinine Ratio and Glomerular Filtration Rate in Korean Adults With Obesity. (PubMed)

The Association Between the Metabolic Syndrome and Metabolic Syndrome Score and Urine Microalbumin/Urine Creatinine Ratio and Glomerular Filtration Rate in Korean Adults With Obesity. This study assessed the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and metabolic syndrome score (MSS) and the levels of urine microalbumin-urine creatinine ratio (uACR) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in Korean adults with obesity.Analyses of data obtained during the 2012 Korean National Health

2017 Journal of Renal Nutrition

22. Effect of Metabolic Syndrome Score, Metabolic Syndrome, and Its Individual Components on the Prevalence and Severity of Angiographic Coronary Artery Disease (PubMed)

Effect of Metabolic Syndrome Score, Metabolic Syndrome, and Its Individual Components on the Prevalence and Severity of Angiographic Coronary Artery Disease The clinical significance of metabolic syndrome (MS) score, MS, and its individual components with respect to risk prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate whether and to what extent MS score, MS, and its individual components were related to the risk of CAD.Among 1191

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2017 Chinese medical journal

23. Comparison of Metabolic Syndrome Indicators in Two Samples of Central and South Americans Living in the Washington, D.C. Area in 1993–1994 and 2008–2009: Secular Changes in Metabolic Syndrome in Hispanics (PubMed)

Comparison of Metabolic Syndrome Indicators in Two Samples of Central and South Americans Living in the Washington, D.C. Area in 1993–1994 and 2008–2009: Secular Changes in Metabolic Syndrome in Hispanics The Central and South American populations are growing rapidly in the US; however, there is a paucity of information about their health status. Objectives: we estimated the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components from two cohorts of Central and South Americans (...) kg/m² (27.6% men and 36.6% women). The overall prevalence of MetS in the 2008-2009 cohort was 28%. The most common abnormal metabolic indicator was an elevated BMI ≥ 25 kg/m² (75.6%). 43.2% of men and 50.7% of women had HDL levels below normal, while the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia was 46.5% and 32.5% for men and women, respectively. Conclusion: the prevalence of MetS was significantly greater in 2008-2009 compared with 1993-1994 (p ≤ 0.05). Dyslipidemia and high BMI have increased

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2017 International journal of environmental research and public health

24. Childhood Age and Associations Between Childhood Metabolic Syndrome and Adult Risk for Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Carotid Intima Media Thickness: The International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort Consortium (PubMed)

Childhood Age and Associations Between Childhood Metabolic Syndrome and Adult Risk for Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Carotid Intima Media Thickness: The International Childhood Cardiovascular Cohort Consortium There is paucity of knowledge concerning the specific age in youth when the associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) begin to be operative. Thus, we investigated the relation of age to the associations of childhood MetS with adult MetS, type 2 diabetes mellitus

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2017 Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease

25. Gender Differences in Lifestyle Factors Associated with Metabolic Syndrome and Preliminary Metabolic Syndrome in the General Population: The Watari Study (PubMed)

Gender Differences in Lifestyle Factors Associated with Metabolic Syndrome and Preliminary Metabolic Syndrome in the General Population: The Watari Study Objective In Japan, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and preliminary metabolic syndrome (preMetS) are more prevalent in men; however, it remains unclear whether the relationship between these metabolic disorders and lifestyle factors is similar between genders. Methods We examined waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting blood, and various (...) lifestyle factors in 3,166 individuals aged from 30-79 years of age from the Japanese general population. MetS was diagnosed on the basis of central obesity - assessed by waist circumference - plus two or more of the following cardio-metabolic risks according to Japanese criteria: high blood pressure, hyperglycemia, and lipid abnormality. Central obesity plus one of the risks was defined as preMetS. Results Men had a significantly higher prevalence of MetS (23.3% vs. 8.7%, p<0.001) and preMetS (21.2% vs

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2017 Internal Medicine

26. Canagliflozin improves risk factors of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (PubMed)

Canagliflozin improves risk factors of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome Metabolic syndrome refers to a collection of risk factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, improves glycemic control and reduces body weight and blood pressure (BP) in a broad range of patients with T2DM. This post hoc analysis assessed the effects (...) of canagliflozin on the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with T2DM and metabolic syndrome.This analysis was based on data from 2 head-to-head studies of canagliflozin in patients with T2DM on background metformin versus glimepiride (study 1) and background metformin plus sulfonylurea versus sitagliptin 100 mg (study 2). Changes from baseline in glycemic efficacy, anthropometric measures, BP, and lipids were evaluated with canagliflozin versus glimepiride and sitagliptin at week 52 in patients who

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2017 Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy

27. Models for estimating the metabolic syndrome biological age as the new index for evaluation and management of metabolic syndrome (PubMed)

Models for estimating the metabolic syndrome biological age as the new index for evaluation and management of metabolic syndrome This study aims to propose a metabolic syndrome (MS) biological age model, through which overall evaluation and management of the health status and aging state in MS can be done easily. Through this model, we hope to provide a novel evaluation and management health index that can be utilized in various health care fields.MS parameters from American Heart Association

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2017 Clinical interventions in aging

28. Obese Children with Metabolic Syndrome Have 3 Times Higher Risk to Have Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Compared with Those without Metabolic Syndrome (PubMed)

Obese Children with Metabolic Syndrome Have 3 Times Higher Risk to Have Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Compared with Those without Metabolic Syndrome The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MS) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in obese children. One hundred and twenty-five subjects aged 11-12 years old participated in the study.Anthropometric and biochemical indices were measured, including lipid and liver profile, blood glucose, serum (...) with MS were 3.01 (2.87-3.57, P < 0.002) times more likely to develop NAFLD compared to those without metabolic syndrome after adjustment of cofounders.Obese children with MS have a higher risk of developing NAFLD. Weight management and early prevention should be the first line of treatment to prevent any possible health issues later on.

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2017 International journal of endocrinology

29. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome components in young adults: A pooled analysis (PubMed)

Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome components in young adults: A pooled analysis Metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) represents a clustering of different metabolic abnormalities. MetSyn prevalence is present in approximately 25% of all adults with increased prevalence in advanced ages. The presence of one component of MetSyn increases the risk of developing MetSyn later in life and likely represents a high lifetime burden of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore we pooled data

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2017 Preventive medicine reports

30. Validity of a continuous metabolic syndrome score as an index for modeling metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents: the CASPIAN-V study (PubMed)

Validity of a continuous metabolic syndrome score as an index for modeling metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents: the CASPIAN-V study The purpose of the present study was to assess the validity of continuous metabolic syndrome score (cMetS) for predicting metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to determine the cutoff values in a representative sample of Iranian children and adolescents.This national study was conducted among 3843 students, aged 7-18 years country during the fifth survey

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2017 Diabetology & metabolic syndrome

31. Contributory Risk and Management of Comorbidities of Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes Mellitus, Hyperlipidemia, and Metabolic Syndrome in Chronic Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

Contributory Risk and Management of Comorbidities of Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes Mellitus, Hyperlipidemia, and Metabolic Syndrome in Chronic Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Circulation. 2016;134:e535–e578. DOI: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000450 December 6, 2016 e535 CLINICAL STATEMENTS AND GUIDELINES T he comorbidities of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome are common in patients with heart failure (HF (...) and detailed recommendations on how to man- age hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syn- drome are lacking. The intent of this AHA scientific statement is to summarize data relevant to contributory risk and to provide guidance on the management of hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome in the development and prognosis of HF to provide recommendations (Table 1) and to foster communication between physicians and other healthcare

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2016 American Heart Association

32. The serum level of a novel lipogenic protein Spot 14 was reduced in metabolic syndrome. (PubMed)

The serum level of a novel lipogenic protein Spot 14 was reduced in metabolic syndrome. Spot 14 (S14) protein is primarily expressed in adipogenic tissues. Compared to wild type, S14 knockout mice had better resistance to diet-induced obesity and glucose tolerance. However, the association between serum S14 level and metabolic variables in humans has never been investigated. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the associations between serum S14 concentrations with components (...) of metabolic syndrome (MetS). A total of 327 subjects were recruited in this cross-sectional study and categorized by presence of MetS. The mean serum levels of S14 were significantly lower in subjects with MetS than those without (87.1±26.3 μg/L vs. 107.3±40.2 μg/L, p<0.001). In addition, the subjects with central obesity, low high density lipoprotein-C (HDL-C) or hypertriglyceridemia also had significantly lower S14 levels in comparison to those without. Adjusted with age and sex, diagnosis of MetS (β

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2019 PLoS ONE

33. Correction: Metabolic syndrome in Xinjiang Kazakhs and construction of a risk prediction model for cardiovascular disease risk. (PubMed)

Correction: Metabolic syndrome in Xinjiang Kazakhs and construction of a risk prediction model for cardiovascular disease risk. [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0202665.].

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2019 PLoS ONE

34. Data mining for the identification of metabolic syndrome status (PubMed)

Data mining for the identification of metabolic syndrome status Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a condition associated with metabolic abnormalities that are characterized by central obesity (e.g. waist circumference or body mass index), hypertension (e.g. systolic or diastolic blood pressure), hyperglycemia (e.g. fasting plasma glucose) and dyslipidemia (e.g. triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). It is also associated with the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2

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2018 EXCLI journal

35. Gender differences in the pathways from childhood disadvantage to metabolic syndrome in adulthood: An examination of health lifestyles (PubMed)

Gender differences in the pathways from childhood disadvantage to metabolic syndrome in adulthood: An examination of health lifestyles We investigate whether socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood shapes adult health lifestyles in domains of physical activity (leisure, work, chores) and diet (servings of healthy [i.e., nutrient-dense] vs. unhealthy [energy-dense] foods). Physical activity and food choices vary by gender and are key factors in the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Thus (...) early-life disadvantage and MetS. For women, leisure-time physical activity partially accounted for the association, with the direct effect of childhood SES remaining significant. Evidence that material deprivation in early life compromises metabolic health in adulthood calls for policy attention to improve economic conditions for disadvantaged families with young children where behavioral pathways (including gender differences therein) may be shaped. The findings also underscore the need to develop

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2018 SSM - population health

36. Metabolic syndrome in adults with a history of juvenile arthritis (PubMed)

Metabolic syndrome in adults with a history of juvenile arthritis The objective of this study was to determine the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome in adults with a history of juvenile arthritis (JA).Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we compared the characteristics of respondents with arthritis (JA vs rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) to those of the control group without arthritis. We used logistic regression analyses, controlling for age, race, and gender (...) , to determine the ORs for metabolic syndrome.Obesity was increased in the JA group with 67% respondents having body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 vs 55% respondents in the no arthritis cohort (p=0.004). In unadjusted analyses, there was increased odds of metabolic syndrome in JA (OR 6.2, p=0.001) and RA groups compared to those without arthritis (OR 7.7, p=0.001). After adjusting for age, gender, and race, the odds of metabolic syndrome remained increased in JA (OR 5.2, p=0.001) and RA (OR 3.2, p=0.001

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2018 Open access rheumatology : research and reviews

37. Helicobacter pylori infection increases risk of incident metabolic syndrome and diabetes: A cohort study. (PubMed)

Helicobacter pylori infection increases risk of incident metabolic syndrome and diabetes: A cohort study. Emerging studies have shed light on the association between Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and cardiometabolic risk. However, there is no evidence to support a causal link for the relationship in the general population. Our aim was to determine whether HP infection is associated with the risks of incident type II diabetes mellitus (DM) in a population-based cohort consisting of adults (...) diseases using logistic regression and Cox regression in a large population-based study. HP infection was significantly associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) (OR = 1.26, 95%CI: 1.00-1.57) and DM (OR = 1.59, 95%CI: 1.17-2.17) only in male subjects, and abnormal endoscopic findings were also correlated with cardiometabolic diseases. Our findings demonstrated that participants with HP infection had an elevated risk of developing incident DM (HR = 1.54, 95%CI: 1.11-2.13). In addition

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2019 PLoS ONE

38. A Comparison of the Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome among Sri Lankan Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Using WHO, NCEP-ATP III, and IDF Definitions (PubMed)

A Comparison of the Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome among Sri Lankan Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Using WHO, NCEP-ATP III, and IDF Definitions Presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, recognition of MetS in type 2 DM is important in initiating the appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures. The commonly used definitions have similarities

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2018 International journal of chronic diseases

39. Testosterone and All-Cause Mortality in Older Men: The Role of Metabolic Syndrome (PubMed)

Testosterone and All-Cause Mortality in Older Men: The Role of Metabolic Syndrome Previous studies have shown controversial results about the role of testosterone in all-cause mortality in elderly men. We hypothesized that metabolic syndrome (MetS) could partly explain this discrepancy. We therefore examined the association of all-cause mortality with total and bioavailable testosterone, taking into account the MetS. We used data from the Three-City Cohort (3C) study with 12-year follow-up

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2018 Journal of the Endocrine Society

40. The impact of bariatric surgery on asthma control differs among obese individuals with reported prior or current asthma, with or without metabolic syndrome. (PubMed)

The impact of bariatric surgery on asthma control differs among obese individuals with reported prior or current asthma, with or without metabolic syndrome. Both obesity and the metabolic syndrome have been independently associated with increased asthma morbidity. However, it is unclear whether metabolic syndrome limits the beneficial effects of weight loss on asthma.To evaluate whether bariatric weight loss is associated with improved asthma control, and whether this association varies (...) by metabolic syndrome status.We determined the changes in asthma control, defined by the Asthma Control Test (ACT), before and after bariatric surgery among participants with asthma in the multi-center Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) study, stratifying our analysis by the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome.Among 2,458 LABS participants, 555 participants had an asthma diagnosis and were included in our analysis. Of these, 78% (n = 433) met criteria for metabolic syndrome (MetSyn

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2019 PLoS ONE

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