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Meperidine

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1601. Comparison of intravenous ketorolac and meperidine in the treatment of biliary colic. (PubMed)

Comparison of intravenous ketorolac and meperidine in the treatment of biliary colic. To compare the analgesic efficacy and tolerability of intravenous (IV) ketorolac tromethamine with IV meperidine in the treatment of biliary colic, a prospective, randomized, double blind study was carried out upon a convenience sample of patients at a large inner city facility. Patients between the ages of 18 and 65 years of age with a history and physical examination consistent with biliary colic were (...) enrolled over a 2-year period. Patients were randomly assigned to receive ketorolac 30 mg IV or meperidine 50 mg IV. Pain was quantified using a 4-point verbal rating system (VRS) as well as a visual analog scale (VAS). Patients were queried about their pain at times 0, 12 h, 1 h, and 2 h after administration of the study medication. Adverse effects were also recorded. A total of 324 patients completed the study protocol with 175 patients receiving ketorolac and 149 receiving meperidine. Patient

2002 Journal of Emergency Medicine

1602. Propofol versus midazolam/meperidine for outpatient colonoscopy: administration by nurses supervised by endoscopists. (PubMed)

Propofol versus midazolam/meperidine for outpatient colonoscopy: administration by nurses supervised by endoscopists. Propofol is under evaluation as a sedative for endoscopic procedures.Eighty outpatients (ASA Class I or II) undergoing colonoscopy were randomized to receive either propofol or midazolam plus meperidine, administered by a nurse and supervised by an endoscopist. Endpoints were patient satisfaction, procedure and recovery times, neuropsychological function, and complications.The (...) mean dose of propofol administered was 218 mg; mean doses of midazolam and meperidine were, respectively, 4.7 mg and 89.7 mg. Mean time to sedation was faster in the propofol patients (2.1 min vs. 7.0 min; p < 0.0001), and depth of sedation was greater (p < 0.0001). On average, after the procedure, the propofol patients could stand at the bedside sooner (14.2 vs. 30.2 min), reached full recovery faster (14.4 vs. 33.0 min), and were discharged sooner (40.5 vs. 71.1 min) (all p < 0.0001). Patients

2002 Gastrointestinal endoscopy

1603. The NARC (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory in renal colic) trial. Single-dose intravenous ketorolac versus titrated intravenous meperidine in acute renal colic: a randomized clinical trial. (PubMed)

The NARC (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory in renal colic) trial. Single-dose intravenous ketorolac versus titrated intravenous meperidine in acute renal colic: a randomized clinical trial. Intravenous (IV) opioid titration is an accepted method of relieving acute renal colic. Studies have shown that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also effective in this setting. Our objective was to compare single-dose ketorolac and titrated meperidine, both administered intravenously (...) pyelogram, ultrasound or stone passage. Meperidine-treated patients received 50 mg IV meperidine at 0 minutes, then 25-50 mg every 15 minutes as needed for ongoing pain. Ketorolac-treated patients received 30 mg IV ketorolac at 0 minutes and placebo injections every 15 minutes as needed. Pain levels and adverse effects were assessed every 15 minutes, and functional status was evaluated at 60 minutes. Our primary outcome was the proportion of patients with mild or no pain at 60 minutes.Overall, 49 of 77

2000 CJEM

1604. Chlorpromazine vs. meperidine in the treatment of phencyclidine psychosis. (PubMed)

Chlorpromazine vs. meperidine in the treatment of phencyclidine psychosis. Patients with phencyclidine psychosis were treated with two 50 mg injections of either chlorpromazine (N = 10) or meperidine (N = 10). The chlorpromazine-treated group responded more rapidly, but the meperidine-treated group had greater overall improvement. It is suggested that meperidine may have a role in the emergency treatment of phencyclidine psychosis. These findings may provide support for the hypothesis

1985 Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

1605. A double-blind study comparing single dose of intramuscularly injected zomepirac to meperidine in the treatment of postoperative pain. (PubMed)

A double-blind study comparing single dose of intramuscularly injected zomepirac to meperidine in the treatment of postoperative pain. Eighty-eight patients with moderate or severe postoperative pain were entered into a double-blind, single-injection trial designed to assess the analgesic efficacy of intramuscular zomepirac 100 mg. Patients were randomly selected to receive zomepirac injection, meperidine 100 mg or meperidine 50 mg. By most criteria of analgesic efficacy, zomepirac was superior (...) to meperidine 50 mg and as effective as meperidine 100 mg. In terms of peak analgesia (and of patients' global evaluations), both meperidine 100 mg and zomepirac were superior to meperidine 50 mg. Total analgesia provided by zomepirac was greater than that with meperidine 100 mg, which was greater than that with meperidine 50 mg. Significantly fewer patients needed remedication during the observation period, and mean time to remedication was significantly longer for the zomepirac group than for either

1987 Pharmacotherapy

1606. Comparative study of the analgesic effect of transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TNS); electroacupuncture (EA) and meperidine in the treatment of postoperative pain. (PubMed)

Comparative study of the analgesic effect of transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TNS); electroacupuncture (EA) and meperidine in the treatment of postoperative pain. Seventy two patients, from 15 to 60 years old, in good physical status and submitted to surgery in the upper or lower abdominal, rectal or lumbar areas were studied. In the immediate postoperative period, they were randomly divided in three groups and each group was submitted to one of the following treatments: intravenous meperidine (...) , transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TNS) or electroacupuncture (EA). Each treatment was divided in two phases with one hour interval between them. Each phase was constituted of 30 minutes of stimulation in case of TNS and EA and fractionated administration of meperidine in all groups. The pain level was evaluated through a visual analogue scale before and after each phase of treatment. The results were compared among groups and, on each group, between the phases of treatment. In all surgery types

1985 Acupuncture & electro-therapeutics research

1607. Meperidine for the treatment of shaking chills and fever. (PubMed)

Meperidine for the treatment of shaking chills and fever. Meperidine hydrochloride was evaluated in a prospectively randomized double-blind study for its effectiveness in stopping shaking chills occurring with amphotericin B infusions. Seven patients were randomized on multiple occasions for a total of 19 reactions. In the meperidine group, nine of nine reactions stopped within 30 minutes of the administration of meperidine, with a mean cessation time of 10.8 minutes. The placebo group had (...) a mean time of 37.4 minutes to cessation of reactions with three of ten reactions subsiding spontaneously. The mean dose of meperidine hydrochloride for cessation of reaction was 45 mg. The comparisons between meperidine and placebo for cessation of reaction within 30 minutes and the mean time to cessation of reaction were significantly different. Side effects with meperidine were minimal and less severe than the shaking chills and fever seen with amphotericin B infusions. Meperidine can eliminate

1980 Archives of internal medicine

1608. [Comparative study of the oral administration of flunitrazepam with oral pentobarbital and intramuscular administration of atropine and pethidine (meperidine) as premedication]. (PubMed)

[Comparative study of the oral administration of flunitrazepam with oral pentobarbital and intramuscular administration of atropine and pethidine (meperidine) as premedication]. Thirty-four patients were allocated at random to treatment with 1 mg of flunitrazepam, orally, the night before operation, and 1 mg on the morning of operation (Group 1), and another 34 to treatment with 100 mg of pentobarbital, orally, the night before operation, followed by intramuscular atropine (0.01 mg/kg (...) )+pethidine (meperidine 1 mg/kg) on the morning of operation (Group 2). The patients in both groups slept equally well. As far as apprehension and excitement (= anxiolytic effect) just before induction of anaesthesia were concerned, oral flunitrazepam proved to be markedly better than i.m. atropine+pethidine. There were no significant differences in cardiovascular variables between the two groups. From the anaesthesiologist's point of view, atropine had beneficial antisecretory effects, but, from

1984 Der Anaesthesist

1609. Picenadol (LY 150720) compared with meperidine and placebo for relief of post-cesarean section pain: a randomized double-blind study. (PubMed)

Picenadol (LY 150720) compared with meperidine and placebo for relief of post-cesarean section pain: a randomized double-blind study. Picenadol (LY 150720) is a racemic mixture of an N-methyl-4-phenylpiperidine derivative, with agonist-antagonist opiate properties. Preclinical animal pharmacology and toxicology studies demonstrated analgesic activity and a low order of toxicity. Clinical pharmacology studies have demonstrated its safety in man. Hospitalized post-cesarean section patients (...) with postoperative pain were blindly given an intramuscular dose of picenadol, 25 mg, meperidine, 100 mg, or placebo. Analgesia and side effects of picenadol and meperidine were similar.

1983 American journal of obstetrics and gynecology

1610. Metkephamid and meperidine analgesia after episiotomy. (PubMed)

Metkephamid and meperidine analgesia after episiotomy. Metkephamid is an analog of methionine enkephalin. The efficacy, safety, and time course of analgesia with 70 or 140 mg metkephamid were compared with those of 100 mg meperidine and placebo in 59 hospitalized women with severe postpartum episiotomy pain. There were two separate trials with single intramuscular doses and identical designs, including parallel groups, randomized blocks, and double-blind conditions. Using subjective reports (...) as indexes of response, patients rated pain intensity, pain relief, and side effects at periodic interviews for 6 hr. Almost all measures of summed and peak analgesia exhibited important differences among the three treatments in both trials. Metkephamid at the 140-mg dose was the most effective and meperidine, 100 mg, was next, whereas metkephamid, 70 mg, and placebo were least effective. Only metkephamid, 140 mg, and meperidine were measurably superior to placebo. Both treatments took effect within 30

1983 Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics

1611. Nalbuphine versus meperidine for post-operative analgesia: a double-blind comparison using the patient controlled analgesic technique. (PubMed)

Nalbuphine versus meperidine for post-operative analgesia: a double-blind comparison using the patient controlled analgesic technique. A double-blind study was undertaken to compare nalbuphine, a synthetic partial agonist opiate, with meperidine in providing analgesia in patients following abdominal surgery, using the patient controlled analgesic technique. Both drugs showed a wide variation in demand requirements, but they were equally effective in relieving pain as assessed by the linear

1983 Canadian Anaesthetists' Society journal

1612. Intravenous meperidine for control of shivering during caesarean section under epidural anaesthesia. (PubMed)

Intravenous meperidine for control of shivering during caesarean section under epidural anaesthesia. To determine the efficacy of meperidine in controlling shivering during epidural anaesthesia for Caesarean section, forty-six parturients were studied. After delivery of the infant, shivering patients received either a single dose of intravenous meperidine 50 mg, or saline in a randomized double-blind fashion. Shivering was classified on a scale of 0 to 3 (grade 0 = none, grade 3 = severe (...) shivering that was distressing to the patient and interfered with monitoring). Shivering and other variables were recorded at epidural placement, skin incision, delivery, and 2, 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes following injection. Administration of meperidine resulted in a significant decrease in both the overall incidence of shivering (87 to 35 per cent, p less than 0.01) and severity of shivering (grade 3:57 to 0 per cent, p less than 0.01), compared with saline (incidence: 87 to 83 per cent, grade 3:57 per

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1988 Canadian journal of anaesthesia = Journal canadien d'anesthesie

1613. Oral morphine versus injected meperidine (Demerol) for pain relief in children after orthopedic surgery. (PubMed)

Oral morphine versus injected meperidine (Demerol) for pain relief in children after orthopedic surgery. This study provides a comparison of two clinical regimens for controlling pain in children for the first 48 h after orthopedic surgery: oral morphine, every 4 h, and injected meperidine (Demerol), every 3-4 h pro re nata. Using Visual Analogue Scale, 25 children between the ages of 7 and 17 years of age, who were randomly divided into two groups, rated the severity of their pain every 1-3 h

1987 Journal of pediatric orthopedics

1614. Butorphanol/diazepam compared to meperidine/diazepam for sedation in oral maxillofacial surgery: a double-blind evaluation. (PubMed)

Butorphanol/diazepam compared to meperidine/diazepam for sedation in oral maxillofacial surgery: a double-blind evaluation. Butorphanol and meperidine, each combined with titrated diazepam, 10 to 20 mg, were compared in a randomized, double-blind trial for their sedative-analgesic effects. The fifty patients underwent multiple dental extractions under local anesthesia and sedation in an outpatient clinic. Butorphanol was significantly superior to meperidine with respect to the diazepam dose (...) required to achieve the target level of sedation, the total diazepam dose administered, the clinical level of sedation, the surgeon's overall evaluations of effectiveness and of sedation level, and several patient evaluation parameters measured at discharge from the recovery room and at follow-up interview. All study drugs were well tolerated. Butorphanol offers clinical advantages over meperidine when combined with diazepam for sedation analgesia in outpatient oral surgery.

1987 Oral surgery, oral medicine, and oral pathology

1615. Pain relief after major abdominal surgery: a double-blind controlled comparison of sublingual buprenorphine, intramuscular buprenorphine, and intramuscular meperidine. (PubMed)

Pain relief after major abdominal surgery: a double-blind controlled comparison of sublingual buprenorphine, intramuscular buprenorphine, and intramuscular meperidine. In a double-blind randomized study of three groups of 18 patients scheduled for major abdominal surgery the efficacy and side effects of sublingual buprenorphine were tested and compared to intramuscular meperidine and buprenorphine. Single doses of either 75 mg of meperidine, 0.4 mg of sublingual buprenorphine, or 0.3 mg (...) of intramuscular buprenorphine were used. Patients given buprenorphine as sublingual tablets were significantly more conscious in the immediate postoperative period (Glasgow Coma Scale) than when given buprenorphine or meperidine intramuscularly. Median pain intensity differences (PID) showed equal pain relief, whereas the summarized pain intensity differences (SPID) were significantly higher in the intramuscular buprenorphine group compared to the meperidine group. Three cases of respiratory acidosis

1987 Anesthesia and analgesia

1616. Comparison of butorphanol tartrate and meperidine in moderate to severe renal colic. (PubMed)

Comparison of butorphanol tartrate and meperidine in moderate to severe renal colic. The analgesic efficacy and safety of parenteral butorphanol and meperidine were compared. The double-blind, randomized study involved 120 patients presenting with moderate to severe renal colic. Pain intensity and pain relief were evaluated by trained observers at fixed time intervals for four hours after study drug was administered. Eighty-three patients with documented upper urinary tract calculi were (...) evaluated for efficacy. Butorphanol 4 mg was significantly more effective than butorphanol 2 mg and was equivalent to meperidine 80 mg. Overall efficacy assessments were "good" or "excellent" for 87 per cent, 72 per cent, and 85 per cent, respectively. There were no significant differences in side effects among treatment groups in the 83 evaluable and 27 inevaluable patients receiving study drugs. Butorphanol was effective and well-tolerated in this patient population, with important advantages over

1987 Urology

1617. Meperidine as a spinal anesthetic agent: a comparison with lidocaine-glucose. (PubMed)

Meperidine as a spinal anesthetic agent: a comparison with lidocaine-glucose. The anesthetic effect of 2 ml of 5% lidocaine in 7.5% glucose (LG) or 5% meperidine in water were evaluated and compared in 40 ASA class 1 or 2 patients. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the two groups (20 patients in each) according to the anesthetic agent, which was injected into the lumbar subarachnoid space in the sitting position. The patients remained sitting for 5 min before being placed in the supine (...) position. Times of onset of sensory and complete motor blockade were significantly more rapid with LG. The extent of maximum cephalad spread of analgesia and the time to maximum height of analgesia in the two groups were not different. Duration of analgesia at the T-7 (48.96 +/- 6.64 min with LG, 44.74 +/- 6.14 min with meperidine; means +/- SEM) and L-1 (94.37 +/- 7.42 min with LG, 76.19 +/- 5.64 min with meperidine) dermatomes was not different in the two groups but was statistically longer at the T

1987 Anesthesia and analgesia

1618. Changes in breathing pattern and chest wall mechanics after benzodiazepines in combination with meperidine. (PubMed)

Changes in breathing pattern and chest wall mechanics after benzodiazepines in combination with meperidine. The effects of repeated sedative i.v. doses of midazolam and diazepam in combination with meperidine on breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion were studied in eight healthy male volunteers. At 20-min intervals in a randomized double-blind crossover design the subjects initially received two doses of midazolam 0.05 mg/kg or diazepam 0.15 mg/kg followed by meperidine 0.5 mg/kg (...) caused only insignificant additional changes. When meperidine was added, the effects on inspiratory time and tidal volume were small and not significant. However, expiratory time increased and was no longer significantly different from control. The injection of naloxone reversed the meperidine-induced changes only, and the breathing pattern was no longer different from that obtained during benzodiazepines alone. The decrease in tidal volume after the benzodiazepines was almost exclusively mediated

1987 Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica

1619. Intrathecal fentanyl/meperidine combined with low-dose epidural bupivacaine for Cesarean section in a patient with advanced Krukenberg tumors. (PubMed)

Intrathecal fentanyl/meperidine combined with low-dose epidural bupivacaine for Cesarean section in a patient with advanced Krukenberg tumors. This case report demonstrates the anesthetic management of a 41-year-old primiparous parturient with massive ascites due to advanced Krukenberg tumors, undergoing Cesarean section. We chose a combined intrathecal-epidural technique, using intrathecal hypobaric fentanyl and hyperbaric meperidine, and a low dose of epidural bupivacaine in order to avoid

2002 Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica

1620. A prospective study of 2 sedation regimens in children: chloral hydrate, meperidine, and hydroxyzine versus midazolam, meperidine, and hydroxyzine. (PubMed)

A prospective study of 2 sedation regimens in children: chloral hydrate, meperidine, and hydroxyzine versus midazolam, meperidine, and hydroxyzine. The aim of this study was to compare both the behavioral and physiological effects of 2 drug regimens in children: chloral hydrate (CH), meperidine (M), and hydroxyzine (H) (regimen A) versus midazolam (MZ), M, and H (regimen B). Patients between 24 and 54 months of age were examined by crossover study design. Behavior was analyzed objectively

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2006 Anesthesia progress

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