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Medication Causes of Headache

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1. Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review

, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA Nancy Lane, M.D. Director and Distinguished Professor Center for Musculoskeletal Health and Department of Internal Medicine University of California at Davis, School of Medicine Sacramento, California Jasvinder Singh, M.D., M.P.H. Division of Rheumatology University of Alabama Birmingham, AL vii Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review Structured Abstract Objective. To summarize the effects of long-term (...) Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 218 RComparative Effectiveness Review Number 218 Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600

2019 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

2. Using Clinical Laboratory Tests to Monitor Drug Therapy in Pain Management Patients

Using Clinical Laboratory Tests to Monitor Drug Therapy in Pain Management Patients LABORATORY MEDICINE PRACTICE GUIDELINES EDITED BY LORALIE J. LANGMAN AND PAUL J. JANNETTO Using Clinical Laboratory Tests to Monitor Drug Therapy in Pain Management Patients Co-Sponsored byLABORATORY MEDICINE PRACTICE GUIDELINES Using Clinical Laboratory Tests to Monitor Drug Therapy in Pain Management Patients Loralie J. Langman Committee Chair Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology Mayo Clinic (...) References 101 Table of ContentsLABORATORY MEDICINE PRACTICE GUIDELINES Using Clinical Laboratory Tests to Monitor Drug Therapy in Pain Management Patients 5 Executive Summary Introduction The American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Acad- emy, formerly the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB), has developed a laboratory medicine practice guidelines (LMPG) for using laboratory tests to monitor drug therapy in pain management patients. The scope and purpose of this guideline

2018 American Academy of Pain Medicine

3. Drug Therapy for Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review Update

or congenital anomaly, or jeopardizes the patient in any serious way d Rash, upper respiratory tract infection, nausea, pruritus, headache, diarrhea, dizziness, abdominal pain, bronchitis, leukopenia, injection site reactions ACR 20/50/70 = American College of Rheumatology 20/50/70% improvement from baseline; AE = adverse event; csDMARD = conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug; DAS = Disease Activity Score; DMARD = disease-modifying antirheumatic drug; ETN = etanercept; FDA = U.S. Food (...) ] to 1.77 [95% CI, 1.32 to 2.36]). However, neither serious adverse events nor discontinuations attributable to adverse events differed between the groups (low SOE). Lack of efficacy is a possible reason that patients may have discontinued the therapy or withdrawn from these studies. Evidence was insufficient for drawing conclusions about several other drug therapy combinations or head-to-head comparisons. Combination Therapies and Treatment Strategies: Four RCTs evaluated different combination

2018 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

4. Newer Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes: An Emerging Adjunctive Therapy to Insulin for Type 1 Diabetes?

Diabetes Canada, have acknowledged that there may be a role for adjunctive therapy in some T1D patients. 10,23,40 In the US, pramlintide acetate injection (Symlin) is the only noninsulin drug approved for adjunctive treatment of T1D. 13,29 Metformin, a T2D medication, is mentioned by Diabetes Canada and the American Diabetes Association for off-label use to reduce insulin requirements and total cholesterol/low-density lipoprotein ratios, 10,17,23 with the caveat that it does not improve hemoglobin A1C (...) Newer Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes: An Emerging Adjunctive Therapy to Insulin for Type 1 Diabetes? Newer Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes: An Emerging Adjunctive Therapy to Insulin for Type 1 Diabetes? | CADTH.ca CADTH Document Viewer Newer Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes: An Emerging Adjunctive Therapy to Insulin for Type 1 Diabetes? Table of Contents Search this document Newer Drugs for Type 2 Diabetes: An Emerging Adjunctive Therapy to Insulin for Type 1 Diabetes? January 2018 Summary There are two major

2018 CADTH - Issues in Emerging Health Technologies

5. Cognitive?Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Non?Opioid Drug Use: A Systematic Review Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cognitive?Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Non?Opioid Drug Use: A Systematic Review Cognitive‐Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Non‐Opioid Drug Use: A Systematic Review - Filges - 2015 - Campbell Systematic Reviews - Wiley Online Library By continuing to browse this site, you agree to its use of cookies as described in our . Search within Search term Search term SYSTEMATIC REVIEW Open Access Cognitive‐Behavioural Therapies (...) below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Copy URL Share a link Share on 1 The terms use, abuse and dependence are used interchangeably throughout the review and refer to an addiction stage of non‐medical usage. that persists beyond curious experimentation is a severe problem worldwide ( ). Drugs such as cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy and cocaine, referred to in this review as non‐opioids 2 Use of ketamine, nitrous oxide and inhalants, e.g. glue and petrol

2015 Campbell Collaboration

6. European Academy of Neurology guideline on the management of medication-overuse headache

headache to exam- ine the impact of a 3-week outpatient interdisciplinary program that included medical interventions address- ing long-term preventive medications, intravenous bridge therapies such as intravenous dihydroergo- tamine and optimization of acute migraine and head- ache management strategies. Outcome parameters were physical functioning and psychological impair- ment. Assessments of headache severity, psychological status and functional impairment were completed by 371 subjects (97.8 (...) - usual frequency during the initial withdrawal period without the fear of causing rebound MOH. The drugs proposed for the treatment of headache dur- ing withdrawal as a bridging therapy are those rec- ommended for the acute migraine attack, e.g. diphenhydramine [93], dihydroergotamine [94], anti- dopaminergic drugs (chlorpromazine, prochlorper- azine, metoclopramide, droperidol) [95-98], valproic acid [99], ketorolac [10], magnesium [11] or corticos- teroids [12,103]. Many medications have been

2020 European Academy of Neurology

7. Does Bed Rest or Fluid Supplementation Prevent Post?Dural Puncture Headache? (SRS therapy)

Does Bed Rest or Fluid Supplementation Prevent Post?Dural Puncture Headache? (SRS therapy) TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Neither bed rest nor ?uid supplementation decreases the incidence of headache after dural puncture. Does Bed Rest or Fluid Supplementation Prevent Post–Dural Puncture Headache? EBEM Commentators Michael D. April, MD, DPhil Brit Long, MD Department of Emergency Medicine San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium Fort Sam Houston, TX Results The review included 24 trials (...) with 2,996 participants. Of these, 12 trials provided moderate- quality evidence of increased incidence of post–dural puncture headache with bed rest compared with immediate mobi- lization (RR 1.24; 95% CI 1.04 to 1.48). Furthermore, 18 trials similarly provided moderate- quality evidence that bed rest increased incidence of any head- ache compared with immediate mobilization (RR 1.16; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.32). Subgroup analyses based on indication for dural puncture, including diagnostic lumbar puncture

2018 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

8. Local injection therapy for cervicogenic headache and occipital neuralgia

headache and occipital neuralgia. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc. Directory Publication. 2017 Authors' conclusions Rationale: For some patients with cervicogenic headache or occipital neuralgia, conservative medical treatments, including oral analgesics and physical therapy, may be sufficient to relieve pain. However, a population of patients with refractory pain may require more invasive treatments, including injection therapy or surgical interventions. Technology Description: Local injection with analgesic (...) medications or botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) may be used to provide pain relief in patients with conditions, including cervicogenic headache and occipital neuralgia. For these conditions, injections are provided in the area of the greater or lesser occipital nerve or along tender points in the cervical muscles. Controversy: Although there is evidence that injection therapy can provide pain relief, the duration of relief may be brief, and injections may need to be administered every few weeks or months

2018 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

9. Oxygen therapy for acutely ill medical patients

An upper limit of oxygen saturation target of no more than 96% Applies to: Does not apply to patients with: Including: Acutely ill adult medical patients already receiving oxygen therapy ≥97% target ≤96% target Carbon monoxide poisoning Critically ill surgical patients Sickle cell crisis Pneumothorax Cluster headaches We recommend that oxygen saturation be maintained no higher than 96% More details Strong All or nearly all informed people would likely want this option. Benefits outweigh harms (...) Oxygen therapy for acutely ill medical patients Oxygen therapy for acutely ill medical patients: a clinical practice guideline | The BMJ Intended for healthcare professionals Username * Password * Edition: Search form Search Search Oxygen therapy for... Oxygen therapy for acutely ill medical patients: a clinical practice guideline (Published 24 October 2018) Cite this as: BMJ 2018;363:k4169 Overview of recommendations Applies to: Patients with acute stroke or myocardial infarction 1 00 99 98 97

2018 BMJ Rapid Recommendations

10. Ustekinumab for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to either conventional therapy or a biologic, or have medical contrai

Ustekinumab for the treatment of adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to either conventional therapy or a biologic, or have medical contrai October 2019 EUnetHTA Joint Action 3 WP4 1 EUnetHTA Joint Action 3 WP4 Version 1.0, 22/10/2019 Relative effectiveness assessment of pharmaceutical technologies USTEKINUMAB FOR THE TREATMENT OF ADULT PATIENTS WITH MODERATELY TO SEVERELY ACTIVE (...) and Pharmaceutical Benefits Agency (TLV). Relative effectiveness assessment of pharmaceutical technologies. Ustekinumab for the treat- ment of adult patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) who have had an inadequate response with, lost response to, or were intolerant to either conventional therapy or a biologic, or have medical contraindications to such therapies. EUnetHTA Project ID: PTJA07. 2019. PTJA07 - Ustekinumab for active ulcerative colitis October 2019 EUnetHTA Joint Action 3

2020 EUnetHTA

11. Herbal cannabis and pharmaceutical cannabinoid treatment following motor vehicle accidents: A state of the science review

of prescription drug therapy 1 1.2 ICBC prescription medication funding policy 2 1.3 Herbal cannabis and pharmaceutical cannabinoids in clinical medical practice in Canada 2 2.0 An overview of a graduated evidence-informed, ICBC funding model 3 2.1 Funding policy decisions within a graduated, evidence informed ICBC funding model 5 2.2 Pharmaceutical cannabinoid medications for regulatory approved indications (LEVEL 1) 6 2.3 Pharmaceutical cannabinoids for indications without regulatory approval (LEVEL 2) 6 (...) as a cause of motor vehicle accidents, while relevant to and important for ICBC, is out of scope for this review. ICBC asked for assistance with developing funding policy for herbal cannabis and pharmaceutical cannabinoid therapy from the Therapeutics Initiative (TI). The TI is an independent prescription drug therapy assessment group, consisting of doctors, pharmacists, epidemiologists and drug policy experts, based at the University of British Columbia. The TI conducts systematic reviews

2020 Therapeutics Letter

12. Pulling the Plug on the First Gene Therapy Drug

is it with changing disease names???). It causes extremely high blood triglyceride levels and, in some patients, recurrent excruciating abdominal pain. Rash and enlarged liver and spleen are also part of the picture. Some of the worst cases are in children and teens. Existing triglyceride-lowering drugs are ineffective because the cause differs. So the only approach, nearly impossible to do, is to eat as little fat as possible. The gene therapy is delivered in 42 injections into leg muscles, once, with a viral (...) Pulling the Plug on the First Gene Therapy Drug Pulling the Plug on the First Gene Therapy Drug | PLOS Blogs Network PLOS Blogs Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific Policy Diverse perspectives on science and medicine Staff Blogs Blogs by Topic Biology & Life Sciences Earth & Environmental Sciences Multi-disciplinary Sciences Medicine & Health Research Analysis & Scientific

2017 PLOS Blogs Network

13. Pituitary apoplexy causing spontaneous remission of acromegaly following long-acting octreotide therapy: a rare drug side effect or just a coincidence Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pituitary apoplexy causing spontaneous remission of acromegaly following long-acting octreotide therapy: a rare drug side effect or just a coincidence Pituitary apoplexy is characterized by abrupt onset of haemorrhage or non-haemorrhagic infarction of a pituitary adenoma. The clinical features include acute onset severe headache, visual field defects, meningeal irritation, ophthalmoplegia and hypopituitarism. The pituitary apoplexy may be clinically silent in ∼25% of patients. We report a case (...) of acromegaly due to pituitary macroadenoma. The patient was started on long-acting octreotide therapy. On 3-month follow-up, the patient showed clinical and biochemical remission and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed subclinical haemorrhage and resolution of tumour. The octreotide therapy was stopped. On 6-month follow-up, the patient was still in remission and the MRI of brain revealed non-enhancing mixed intensities haemorrhagic and cystic areas of the pituitary gland. In our

2016 Oxford Medical Case Reports

14. Headache - medication overuse

recommends replacing the over-used medication with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or amitriptyline until the medication overuse headache improves. It is now recommended that, for suitable people, abrupt withdrawal without drug replacement is tried first. September 2008 — minor correction to the Changes section. October 2005 — minor technical update. July 2005 — update to text discussing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the Medicines management and Prescribing points sections (...) cough headache and cold-stimulus headache. Secondary headachesheadache attributed to an underlying condition including: Trauma or injury to the head and/or neck . Cranial or cervical vascular disorders for example intracerebral haemorrhage, central venous thrombosis or giant cell arteritis. Non-vascular intracranial disorders for example idiopathic intracranial hypertension or neoplasm. Exposure to, or withdrawal from, a substance such as carbon monoxide, cocaine or alcohol — medication overuse

2017 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

15. Covid-19: Headache

investigations showed that 8% of patients with COVID-19 infection reported headache (1). The presence of headache is not helpful for the diagnosis or prognosis of COVID-19 infection. Headache in COVID-19 infection probably coexists with fever and may be dependent on it. TIP TWO In patients with primary headaches, stay posted with the patients, they need medical care more under the current circumstances, but minimize in-person visits. Emerge tele-medicine by using several i-tech programs, those that a common (...) worsen and negatively affect chronic headaches and medication overuse. It is important to remember that intake of medications for acute treatment for migraine should be limited to less than two times per week. TIP FOUR Use of anti-inflammatory drugs for headache There is no conclusive scientific evidence that the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) aggravates COVID-19 infection, despite recent media reports linking certain NSAIDs, notably ibuprofen, to worsening symptoms in patients

2020 European Academy of Neurology

16. The journey from genetic predisposition to medication overuse headache to its acquisition as sequela of chronic migraine Full Text available with Trip Pro

The journey from genetic predisposition to medication overuse headache to its acquisition as sequela of chronic migraine Migraine remains one of the biggest clinical case to be solved among the non-communicable diseases, second to low back pain for disability caused as reported by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Despite this, its genetics roots are still unknown. Its evolution in chronic forms hits 2-4% of the population and causes a form so far defined Medication Overuse Headache (MOH (...) ), whose pathophysiological basis have not been explained by many dedicated studies. The Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 has not recognized MOH as independent entity, but as a sequela of Chronic Migraine. This concept, already reported in previous studies, has been confirmed by the efficacy of OnabotulinumtoxinA in Chronic Migraine independently from the presence of MOH. The consistency of the current definitions of both Medication Overuse Headache and Chronic Migraine itself might be re-read

2018 The journal of headache and pain

17. Assessment of acute headache in children

Society (IHS). The international classification of headache disorders, 3rd edition. Cephalalgia. 2018 Jan;38(1):1-211. https://www.ichd-3.org/ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29368949?tool=bestpractice.com Primary headaches include migraine, tension-type, cluster, as well as the new daily persistent headache. Secondary headaches are symptomatic of an underlying intracranial or medical condition that requires treatment. The initial assessment of acute headache aims to determine whether (...) there is a secondary cause for headache that requires urgent intervention. Clinical classification Headache may be classified in terms of time course. Acute headache A single episode of headache pain without prior headaches. May represent the first or an unusually severe form of primary headache. May suggest a new acute secondary cause for headache that, therefore, requires evaluation. Acute recurrent headache Stereotyped headaches separated by headache-free periods. Most suggestive of a primary headache disorder

2018 BMJ Best Practice

18. Assessment of acute headache in adults

Assessment of acute headache in adults Assessment of acute headache in adults - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of acute headache in adults Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: June 2018 Summary Headache is pain localised to any part of the head, behind the eyes or ears, or in the upper neck. Headaches represent 2% of all emergency department visits. Ninety percent of men and 95 (...) % of women have at least one headache per year. Diagnostic clues should be derived primarily from history. Hallmark physical signs are often absent, and many physical findings are non-specific. The majority of patients presenting with acute headache have a benign diagnosis, but a high index of suspicion should be maintained for life-threatening causes of headache. Ramirez-Lassepas M, Espinosa CE, Cicero JJ, et al. Predictors of intracranial pathologic findings in patients who seek emergency care because

2018 BMJ Best Practice

19. Medication Causes of Headache

Medication Causes of Headache Medication Causes of Headache Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Medication Causes (...) with ) Diclofenac (Voltaren) ( ) Pulmonary Agents ( ) Endocrine Agents CNS Agents s ( ) III. Causes: Headaches related to medication or Substance Withdrawal Chemicals withdrawal Miscellaneous Agents withdrawal IV. References Goldman (2000) Cecil Medicine, Saunders, p. 2066 Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Medication Causes of Headache." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window

2018 FP Notebook

20. Headache

or tightening quality; mild-to-moderate intensity; not aggravated by routine physical activity. Episodes of headache are not associated with nausea (...) or vomiting. Photophobia or phonophobia, but not both, may be present. Headache that is not caused by other conditions, such as a pyrexial illness or medication overuse. The cause of TTH is not fully understood. It has been shown to be associated with the presence of myofascial trigger points, and abnormal central processing of pain (causing increased pain (...) , an invasive procedure frequently performed in the emergency room. Numerous pharmaceutical drugs have been proposed to treat PDPH but there are still some uncertainties about their clinical (...) pharmacological drug used for treating PDPH. Outcome measures considered for this review were: PDPH persistence of any severity at follow-up (primary outcome), daily activity limited by headache , conservative supplementary therapeutic option offered, epidural blood patch performed, change in pain severity scores

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

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