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Medication Causes of Dyspepsia

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121. Drugs for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiotherapy is associated with low rates of severe toxic events and... 3D Model GI Tract Video How to Insert a Nasogastric Tube SOCIAL MEDIA Add to Any Platform Loading , MD, Mount Sinai Medical Center; Rafael Antonio Ching Companioni , MD, Icahn School of Medicine, Elmhurst Hospital Center Click here for Patient Education NOTE: This is the Professional Version. CONSUMERS: Several classes of drugs are helpful for (IBD). Details of their selection and use (...) Drugs for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Drugs for Inflammatory Bowel Disease - Gastrointestinal Disorders - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / IN THIS TOPIC OTHER TOPICS IN THIS CHAPTER

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

122. Pathogen-specific risk of chronic gastrointestinal disorders following bacterial causes of foodborne illness. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pathogen-specific risk of chronic gastrointestinal disorders following bacterial causes of foodborne illness. The US CDC estimates over 2 million foodborne illnesses are annually caused by 4 major enteropathogens: non-typhoid Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Shigella spp. and Yersinia enterocoltica. While data suggest a number of costly and morbid chronic sequelae associated with these infections, pathogen-specific risk estimates are lacking. We utilized a US Department of Defense medical (...) encounter database to evaluate the risk of several gastrointestinal disorders following select foodborne infections.We identified subjects with acute gastroenteritis between 1998 to 2009 attributed to Salmonella (nontyphoidal) spp., Shigella spp., Campylobacter spp. or Yersinia enterocolitica and matched each with up to 4 unexposed subjects. Medical history was analyzed for the duration of military service time (or a minimum of 1 year) to assess for incident chronic gastrointestinal disorders. Relative

2013 BMC Gastroenterology

123. An unusual case of gastric outlet obstruction caused by tuberculosis: challenges in diagnosis and treatment Full Text available with Trip Pro

An unusual case of gastric outlet obstruction caused by tuberculosis: challenges in diagnosis and treatment Gastroduodenal tuberculosis (GDTB) is rare in the West. Its presentation can be non-specific and often mimics other more common conditions such as peptic ulcer disease, malignancy and Crohn's disease. Our case describes a 33-year-old Indian immigrant who presented with a 3-year history of dyspepsia and underwent balloon dilation for gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). While biopsies from (...) the duodenum revealed only non-caseating granuloma, a high index of suspicion was maintained and colonoscopy, performed despite the absence of lower gastrointestinal symptoms, revealed a single discrete nodular and ulcerated area in the proximal transverse colon; this eventually grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our patient avoided undergoing major surgery and was successfully treated with balloon dilation and antitubercular medication. We highlight the importance of having a concerted, proactive approach

2013 BMJ case reports

124. Dyspepsia

illnesses but are less likely to... 3D Model GI Tract Video How to Insert a Nasogastric Tube SOCIAL MEDIA Add to Any Platform Loading , MD, Harvard Medical School Click here for Patient Education NOTE: This is the Professional Version. CONSUMERS: Topic Resources Dyspepsia is a sensation of pain or discomfort in the upper abdomen; it often is recurrent. It may be described as indigestion, gassiness, early satiety, postprandial fullness, gnawing, or burning. Podcast Etiology There are several common (...) or indigestion rather than chest pain by some patients May have exertional component Cardiac risk factors ECG Serum cardiac markers Sometimes stress testing Delayed gastric emptying (caused by diabetes, viral illness, or drugs) Nausea, bloating, fullness Scintigraphic test of gastric emptying Drugs (eg, bisphosphonates, erythromycin and other macrolide antibiotics, estrogens, iron, NSAIDs, potassium) Use apparent on history Symptoms coincident with use Clinical evaluation Substernal chest pain

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

125. Corticotropin Releasing Hormone (CRH) Responsiveness in Children With Functional Dyspepsia

) Primary Purpose: Basic Science Official Title: CRH Responsiveness in Children With Functional Dyspepsia: A Pilot Study Study Start Date : December 2014 Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2016 Estimated Study Completion Date : March 2017 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related topics: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Functional Dyspepsia cohort Cohort of subjects with functional dyspepsia Drug: Acthrel Powder for reconstitution (...) ; Scheduled for endoscopy to evaluate dyspepsia following non-response to standard acid reduction therapy; >20kg/45 lbs. and, Group 2 (Controls): Ages 8-17 inclusive; >20kg/45 lbs. Exclusion Criteria: Both groups: Previous abdominal surgery; <20 kg/45 lbs.: Pregnancy; Chronic disease requiring regular medical care (e.g. diabetes mellitus, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, cystic fibrosis, cancer); or, Non-English speaking. Controls: Recent history (within 6 months) of abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting

2011 Clinical Trials

126. The Clinical Significance of Acid Rebound in Functional Dyspepsia

Loedrup, Zealand University Hospital Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) have been shown to cause acid reflux related symptoms at withdrawal in healthy volunteers, a phenomenon known as Rebound Acid Hyper Secretion. Whether this also applies for patients with dyspeptic symptoms but without true reflux disease (functional dyspepsia) treated with PPI is unknown. If this is the case, it could lead to an unfortunate long term use of PPI, since the acid rebound (...) the primary endpoint (Development of GERD) but will be included in the analysis regarding one of the secondary endpoints (Effect of PPI on Functional Dyspepsia). Study subjects are randomized to either pantoprazol followed by cross over to placebo or to placebo. Escape medication in the form of Gaviscon can be used on demand. Internet based questionnaires are answered weekly. Questionnaires consist of the Gastrointestinal Symptom rating Scale (GSRS) in combination with items assessing postprandial

2011 Clinical Trials

127. Study Comparing Sequential and Concomitant Therapy for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication in Routine Clinical Practice

Study Start Date : December 2010 Estimated Primary Completion Date : June 2012 Estimated Study Completion Date : July 2012 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine available for: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Active Comparator: Sequential treatment: Drug: PPI, amoxicillin, metronidazole and clarithromycin Dual therapy for 5 days: PPI and 1g amoxicillin every 12h. After dual therapy continue with a triple therapy for 5 days: PPI, 1g amoxicillin, 500 mg (...) , peptic ulcer and gastric tumors (adenocarcinoma and lymphoma). The cure of the H. pylori infection prevents recurrence of duodenal and gastric ulcer and improves dyspepsia in a significant proportion of cases, so it is cost-effective. Eradication therapy has changed over time. The usually recommended pattern in the consensus conferences has traditionally been triple therapy, composed by the combination of 2 antibiotics (clarithromycin plus amoxicillin or metronidazole) and a proton pump inhibitor

2011 Clinical Trials

128. 14-day Quadruple Hybrid vs. Concomitant Therapies for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication

by the National Library of Medicine available for: Arms and Interventions Go to Arm Intervention/treatment Active Comparator: "Hybrid" therapy Dual therapy for 7 days: 40 mg omeprazole and 1g amoxicillin every 12h. After dual therapy continue with a quadruple therapy for 7 days: 40 mg omeprazole, 1g amoxicillin, 500 mg metronidazole and 500 mg clarithromycin every 12h. Drug: PPI, amoxicillin, metronidazole and clarithromycin Dual therapy for 7 days: 40 mg omeprazole and 1g amoxicillin every 12h. After dual (...) , 2011 Last Update Posted : December 31, 2012 Sponsor: Infante, Javier Molina, M.D. Information provided by (Responsible Party): Infante, Javier Molina, M.D. Study Details Study Description Go to Brief Summary: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects approximately 50% of the adult population and is well recognized as the main cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The cure of the H. pylori infection prevents recurrence of duodenal and gastric ulcer and improves dyspepsia

2011 Clinical Trials

129. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management

guidance on off-label use of a medical device for further information. [7] Aspirin intolerance is defined as either of the following: proven hypersensitivity to aspirin- containing medicines, or history of severe dyspepsia induced by low-dose aspirin. [8] There may be a subgroup of people for whom the risk of venous thromboembolism outweighs the risk of haemorrhagic transformation. People considered to be at particularly high risk of venous thromboembolism include anyone with complete paralysis (...) and referred urgently for carotid endarterectomy to a service following current national standards [1] receive best medical treatment (control of blood pressure, antiplatelet agents, cholesterol lowering through diet and drugs, lifestyle advice). [2008, amended 2019] [2008, amended 2019] 1.2.5 Ensure that people with stable neurological symptoms from acute non-disabling stroke or TIA who have symptomatic carotid stenosis of less than 50% according to the NASCET criteria, or less than 70% according

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

130. IQoro for hiatus hernia

or long courses of medication. Current NHS pathway or current care pathway NICE's guideline on gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia in adults: investigation and management recommends offering a full-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) long-term as maintenance treatment for people with severe oesophagitis (reflux disease). Laparoscopic fundoplication should be considered for people who have a confirmed diagnosis of acid reflux and enough symptom control with acid suppression therapy but who do (...) not wish to continue with this therapy long term. It should also be considered in people who have a confirmed diagnosis of acid reflux and symptoms that are responding to a PPI, but who cannot tolerate acid suppression therapy. IQoro for hiatus hernia (MIB176) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 12IQoro would be used to improve symptoms by attempting to address the underlying cause of hiatus hernia

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

131. Patisiran for treating hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis

) amyloidosis is an ultra-rare condition caused by inherited mutations in the transthyretin (TTR) gene. This causes the liver to produce abnormal TTR protein, which accumulates as deposits in body tissues (amyloidosis). These deposits can disrupt the structure and damage the function of affected tissues. 2.2 Because hATTR amyloidosis can affect tissues throughout the body, people may have a range of symptoms relating to 1 or more systems. These can include the autonomic nervous system, peripheral nerves (...) polyneuropathy' . 3.2 The most common adverse reactions listed in the summary of product characteristics for patisiran include peripheral oedema, infusion-related reactions, infections, vertigo, dyspnoea, dyspepsia, erythema, arthralgia and muscle spasms. For full details of adverse reactions and contraindications, see the summary of product characteristics. 3.3 The price of patisiran is £7,676.45 per 10-mg vial (excluding VAT; company submission). The company has a commercial arrangement. This makes

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Highly specialised technology

132. Tigecycline

• Abdominal pain, dyspepsia (stomach ache and indigestion), anorexia (loss of appetite) • Increases in liver enzymes, hyperbilirubinaemia (excess of bile pigment in the blood) • Pruritus (itching), rash • Poor or slow wound healing • Headache • Increase in amylase, which is an enzyme found in the salivary glands and pancreas, increased blood urea nitrogen (BUN). • Pneumonia • Low blood sugar • Sepsis (severe infection in the body and blood stream)/septic shock (serious medical condition which can lead (...) Tigecycline 1 ANNEX I SUMMARY OF PRODUCT CHARACTERISTICS 2 1. NAME OF THE MEDICINAL PRODUCT Tigecycline Accord 50 mg powder for solution for infusion 2. QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE COMPOSITION Each 5 ml Tigecycline Accord vial contains 50 mg of tigecycline. After reconstitution, 1 ml contains 10 mg of tigecycline. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. 3. PHARMACEUTICAL FORM Powder for solution for infusion (powder for infusion). Orange cake or powder. 4. CLINICAL PARTICULARS 4.1

2020 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

133. Peptic ulcer disease

Peptic ulcer disease Peptic ulcer disease - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Peptic ulcer disease Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: February 2019 Summary Peptic ulcers usually present as chronic, upper abdominal pain related to eating a meal (dyspepsia). Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori infection are the most common causes. There may be some (...) epigastric tenderness, but often there are no other signs on physical examination. Endoscopy is diagnostic and may show an ulcer in the stomach or proximal duodenum. H pylori infection should be sought. In the absence of 'alarm' (red flag) symptoms or signs, testing for and treating H pylori and/or empirical acid inhibition therapy is appropriate. The most common complication is gastroduodenal bleeding. Perforation is a less frequent but potentially life-threatening complication. Either of these may

2019 BMJ Best Practice

134. Laparoscopic insertion of a magnetic titanium ring for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

, oesophageal stricture and Barrett's oesophagus. Laparoscopic insertion of a magnetic titanium ring for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (IPG585) © NICE 2018. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 2 of 82.2 A NICE clinical guideline describes recommendations for the investigation and management of GORD and dyspepsia in adults. The standard treatments for symptomatic GORD are lifestyle modification and drug therapy. Patients (...) (GORD) is a common problem. It is caused by conditions that disturb the sphincter function at the lower end of the oesophagus, such as a hiatus hernia. Symptoms of GORD can be broadly grouped into those directly related to reflux episodes, such as heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain and nausea, and those caused by complications of the disease, including dysphagia and respiratory difficulties. Repeated episodes of GORD can damage the lining of the oesophagus and lead to oesophageal ulceration

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

135. Cerebral palsy in under 25s: assessment and management

Managing saliva control 1.11.1 Assess factors that may affect drooling in children and young people with cerebral palsy, such as positioning, medication history, reflux and dental issues, before starting drug therapy. 1.11.2 T o reduce the severity and frequency of drooling in children and young people with cerebral palsy, consider the use of anticholinergic medication: glycopyrronium bromide [3] (oral or by enteral tube) or or transdermal hyoscine hydrobromide [4] or or trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride (...) of care: paediatric or adult medicine nursing care physiotherapy occupational therapy Cerebral palsy in under 25s: assessment and management (NG62) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 11 of 46speech and language therapy dietetics psychology can enable access to other services within their local or regional network as appropriate, including: paediatric or adult neurodisability, neurology

2017 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

136. Management of Dyslipidaemias Full Text available with Trip Pro

hypercholesterolaemia 41 9.1.2.3 Familial hypercholesterolaemia in children 41 9.1.3 Familial dysbetalipoproteinaemia 41 9.1.4 Genetic causes of hypertriglyceridaemia 41 9.1.4.1 Action to prevent acute pancreatitis in severe hypertriglyceridaemia 41 9.1.5 Other genetic disorders of lipoprotein metabolism 42 9.2 Women 42 9.2.1 Effects of statins in primary and secondary prevention 42 9.2.2 Non-statin lipid-lowering drugs 42 9.2.3 Hormone therapy 42 9.3 Older people 42 9.3.1 Effects of statins in primary (...) Cardiovascular Risk Subjects eGFR Estimated glomerular filtration rate EMA European Medicines Agency EPA Eicosapentaenoic acid ESC European Society of Cardiology EVOLVE EpanoVa fOr Lowering Very high triglyceridEs EVOPACS EVOlocumab for early reduction of LDL-cholesterol levels in patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes FCH Familial combined hyperlipidaemia FCS Familial chylomicronaemia syndrome FDA US Food and Drug Administration FH Familial hypercholesterolaemia FIELD Fenofibrate Intervention and Event

2019 European Society of Cardiology

137. Mexiletine hydrochloride (Namuscla) - symptomatic treatment of myotonia in adult patients with non-dystrophic myotonic disorders

Mexiletine hydrochloride (Namuscla) - symptomatic treatment of myotonia in adult patients with non-dystrophic myotonic disorders 1 Published 09 March 2020 1 SMC2241 mexiletine 167mg hard capsules (Namuscla®) Lupin Healthcare (UK) Ltd 7 February 2020 The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (ADTCs) on its use in NHSScotland. The advice is summarised as follows: ADVICE: following (...) in the management of patients with mainly dystrophic myotonic dystrophy. The guidance states that “mexiletine is an effective short term treatment for grip myotonia. There are no studies on long term therapy. Myotonia in DM1 [Type 1 myotonic dystrophy] rarely requires therapy. It is recommended that mexiletine should only be prescribed by a neurologist and after cardiology review.” 6 13 Additional information: comparators There are no other licensed comparators. Other medicines are used off-label, including

2020 Scottish Medicines Consortium

138. Clostridioides difficile Infection in Adults and Children

Management Strategy for CDI Table 5. Guidance on Preemptive Isolation for Patients with Diarrhea Preemptive isolation should be considered if patients have diarrhea (3 or more watery stools in 12 to 24 hours) * not caused by laxative use, chemotherapy, enteral feeds or other medical causes AND AT LEAST ONE of the following: ? Current or prior antibiotic use (within 30 days) ? Significant abdominal pain, not caused by incisional pain, dyspepsia, or nausea ? History of C. difficile ? Suspect C. difficile (...) if they have colonic involvement and they are on immunomodulator therapy. 16 Immunosuppression. Immunosuppressed states such as leukemia, lymphoma, HIV, neutropenia, organ transplantation, and use of immunosuppressive drugs significantly increase the risk for CDI. In HIV-infected patients, CDI is the most common 13 UMHS C. difficile Infection in Adults and Children MM/YYYY cause for bacterial diarrhea and risk of CDI correlates with severity of HIV disease. 17,18 Acid Suppressive Therapy. Acid suppressive

2020 University of Michigan Health System

139. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

email Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Some error has occurred while processing your request. Please try after some time. Export to End Note Procite Reference Manager Save my selection 1 Medically Associated Science and Technology (MAST) Program, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA; 2 Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; 3 Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North (...) . INTRODUCTION Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been recognized as a medical phenomenon for many decades. Although its definition has been debated, the principle concept is that the normal small bowel has lower levels of microbial colonization compared with the colon and this normal balance is significantly altered in SIBO. SIBO is defined as the presence of excessive numbers of bacteria in the small bowel causing gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. These bacteria are usually coliforms, which

2020 American College of Gastroenterology

140. Iron Deficiency – Diagnosis and Management

history, symptom review and physical examination. Directed history should include: nutrition and physical activity history pregnancy status and number of pregnancies history of blood loss, including GI bleeding, hematuria, menorrhagia, and blood donation GI symptoms including changes in bowel habits, abdominal pain, dyspepsia, and unexplained weight loss family history including colorectal cancer Menorrhagia is the most frequent cause of iron deficiency among pre-menopausal women. Consider referral (...) ferritin may indicate hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Long term iron therapy is harmful for these patients. Individualize disease-specific management depending on underlying cause. Even when there is an apparently obvious cause the etiology may be multifactorial. Dietary iron intake To help prevent iron deficiency, encourage all individuals to consume a diet with sufficient iron. This may include establishing individualized iron intake goals according to recommended daily intake based on sex

2019 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

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