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Medication Causes of Dyspepsia

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81. Paediatric Urology

, H.N., et al. Reduced bacterial colonisation of the glans penis after male circumcision in children--a prospective study. J Pediatr Urol, 2013. 9: 1137. 30. Larke, N.L., et al. Male circumcision and penile cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Cancer Causes Control, 2011. 22: 1097. 31. Thompson, H.C., et al. Report of the ad hoc task force on circumcision. Pediatrics, 1975. 56: 610. 32. American Academy of Pediatrics: Report of the Task Force on Circumcision. Pediatrics, 1989. 84: 388. 33 (...) in Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Eur Radiol, 2001. 11: 2267. 130. Diamond, D.A., et al. Neonatal scrotal haematoma: mimicker of neonatal testicular torsion. BJU Int, 2003. 91: 675. 131. Ha, T.S., et al. Scrotal involvement in childhood Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Acta Paediatr, 2007. 96: 552. 132. Hara, Y., et al. Acute scrotum caused by Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Int J Urol, 2004. 11: 578. 133. Klin, B., et al. Acute idiopathic scrotal edema in children--revisited. J Pediatr Surg, 2002. 37: 1200. 134. Krause

2019 European Association of Urology

82. Male Sexual Dysfunction

dysfunction. J Sex Med, 2010. 7: 445. 27. NIH Consensus Conference. Impotence. NIH Consensus Development Panel on Impotence. JAMA, 1993. 270: 83. 28. Feldman, H.A., et al. Impotence and its medical and psychosocial correlates: results of the Massachusetts Male Aging Study. J Urol, 1994. 151: 54. 29. Fisher, W.A., et al. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a shared sexual concern of couples I: couple conceptions of ED. J Sex Med, 2009. 6: 2746. 30. Salonia, A., et al. Is erectile dysfunction a reliable proxy (...) . part 1: screening, diagnosis, and local treatment with curative intent-update 2013. Eur Urol, 2014. 65: 124. 98. Maggi, M., et al. Hormonal causes of male sexual dysfunctions and their management (hyperprolactinemia, thyroid disorders, GH disorders, and DHEA). J Sex Med, 2013. 10: 661. 99. Laumann, E.O., et al. The epidemiology of erectile dysfunction: results from the National Health and Social Life Survey. Int J Impot Res, 1999. 11 Suppl 1: S60. 100. Miner, M., et al. Cardiometabolic risk

2019 European Association of Urology

83. Management of Non-neurogenic Male LUTS

: 563. 16. Ficarra, V., et al. The role of inflammation in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and its potential impact on medical therapy. Curr Urol Rep, 2014. 15: 463. 17. He, Q., et al. Metabolic syndrome, inflammation and lower urinary tract symptoms: possible translational links. Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis, 2016. 19: 7. 18. Drake, M.J. Do we need a new definition of the overactive bladder syndrome? ICI-RS 2013. Neurourol Urodyn, 2014. 33: 622. 19 (...) : 827. 77. Mochtar, C.A., et al. Post-void residual urine volume is not a good predictor of the need for invasive therapy among patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. J Urol, 2006. 175: 213. 78. Jorgensen, J.B., et al. Age-related variation in urinary flow variables and flow curve patterns in elderly males. Br J Urol, 1992. 69: 265. 79. Kranse, R., et al. Causes for variability in repeated pressure-flow measurements. Urology, 2003. 61: 930. 80. Reynard, J.M., et al. The ICS-’BPH’ Study

2019 European Association of Urology

84. 2019 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

and obesity, counseling and caloric restriction are recommended for achieving and maintaining weight loss. 5. Adults should engage in at least 150 minutes per week of accumulated moderate-intensity physical activity or 75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity physical activity. 6. For adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus, lifestyle changes, such as improving dietary habits and achieving exercise recommendations, are crucial. If medication is indicated, metformin is first-line therapy, followed (...) levels (=190 mg/dL), those with diabetes mellitus, who are 40 to 75 years of age, and those determined to be at sufficient ASCVD risk after a clinician–patient risk discussion. 10. Nonpharmacological interventions are recommended for all adults with elevated blood pressure or hypertension. For those requiring pharmacological therapy, the target blood pressure should generally be $200 billion annually in healthcare services, medications, and lost productivity. Much of this is attributable

2019 American Heart Association

85. Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Neurogenic Overactive Bladder (OAB) in Adults

as bothersome the patient may be diagnosed with overactive bladder (OAB). 27 Additionally, a caregiver or partner may perceive these symptoms as bothersome and lead the patient to seek care. It is common for patients to have suffered with their symptoms for an extended time before seeking medical advice. Differentiation. OAB symptoms (frequency, urgency and urgency incontinence) may occur only at night, causing a single symptom of nocturia. The differential of nocturia includes nocturnal polyuria (...) mobility, which can complicate treatment. To treat incontinence, optimally the patient must have a desire to be continent or have a desire for symptom improvement. In patients with cognitive deficits, this desire may not be present and family and/or caregivers may have difficulty understanding that simply giving a medication will not correct the problem. The other common situation associated with OAB is severely reduced mobility. Causes can range from dementia, severe arthritis, severe obesity

2019 American Urological Association

86. BSG consensus guidelines on the management of inflammatory bowel disease in adults

0SF, UK 31. University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK 32. Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, B15 2TH, UK 33. University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK 34. University College London, London, WC1E 6BT, UK 35. University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, NW1 2PG, UK 36. Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton, BN2 5BE, UK 37. Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, BN1 9PX, UK 38. Royal Wolverhampton NHS (...) manuscript 10 Version accepted by Gut 10 th June 2019 4.7 Stricturing disease 90 4.7.1 Medical therapy for strictures 90 4.7.2 Surgical therapy for strictures 90 4.7.3 Strictureplasty 91 4.7.4 Endoscopic therapy for strictures 92 4.8 Non-perianal fistulising Crohn’s disease and abscesses 93 4.8.1 Intra-abdominal abscesses 93 4.8.2 Medical therapy 93 4.8.3 Enterovaginal and enterovesical fistulae 94 4.8.4 Enteroenteric fistulae 94 4.8.5 Enterocutaneous fistulae 95 4.8.6 Anti-TNF therapy for non-perianal

2019 British Society of Gastroenterology

87. Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Neurogenic Overactive Bladder (OAB) in Adults: an AUA/SUFU Guideline

be diagnosed with overactive bladder (OAB). 27 Additionally, a caregiver or partner may perceive these symptoms as bothersome and lead the patient to seek care. It is common for patients to have suffered with their symptoms for an extended time before seeking medical advice. Differentiation. OAB symptoms (frequency, urgency and urgency incontinence) may occur only at night, causing a single symptom of nocturia. The differential of nocturia includes nocturnal polyuria (the production of greater than 20 (...) to be continent or have a desire for symptom improvement. In patients with cognitive deficits, this desire may not be present and family and/or caregivers may have difficulty understanding that simply giving a medication will not correct the problem. The other common situation associated with OAB is severely reduced mobility. Causes can range from dementia, severe arthritis, severe obesity, hemiparesis/plegia, and lower extremity amputations. In these situations, despite receiving an urge to urinate

2019 American Urological Association

88. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Luminal Crohn’s Disease

: TNF; 5-ASA; Guidance; Mucosal Healing Crohn’s disease (CD) is a lifelong illness with substantial mor- bidity and mortality. Studies have shown that up to one-third of patients require hospitalization within the first year after diagnosis and more than half within 5 years. 1 In addition to in- creased risk of mortality from digestive conditions, CD is also associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortal - ity compared with the general population (standardized mor- tality ratio (...) , 1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34–1.58). 2 Furthermore, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is signifi - cantly lower among patients with CD compared with normal populations because of the impact of CD on physical, emo- tional, and social well-being. 3 The cause of CD is not well-defined, which makes it chal - lenging to develop specific targeted treatments, but a number of treatments have demonstrated efficacy in CD. In the last decade, treatment paradigms have changed, recognizing

2019 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology

89. Oesophageal manometry and oesophageal reflux monitoring

for oesophageal manometry for symptoms of dysphagia, regurgitation or chest pain to rule out structural and mucosal causes for their symptoms including eosinophilic oesophagitis. Endoscopy also allows assessment of abnormalities (eg, oesophageal diverticula, pharyngeal pouch, varices, etc), which potentially increase the risk of insertion of a catheter into the oesophagus. Any medication known to affect oesophageal motor function should be stopped for 48 hours prior to the test if possible (eg, nitrates (...) or persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms following antireflux surgery should undergo reflux monitoring by pH/impedance, rather than pH moni- toring alone, as this can objectively confirm or reject persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux and exclude other causes for symp- toms such as supragastric belching. GRADE evidence: Low Strength recommendation: Conditional/weak 3. Wireless oesophageal pH monitoring Technical aspects of wireless pH monitoring 3.1 Wireless pH monitoring should be undertaken

2019 British Society of Gastroenterology

90. Deprescribing proton pump inhibitors

in conjunction with patients. D eprescribing is the planned and supervised process of dose reduction or stopping of medication that might be caus- ing harm or might no longer be providing benefit. 1 The goal of deprescribing is to reduce medication burden and harm while maintaining or improving quality of life. However, deprescribing can be difficult, especially when medications do not appear to be causing overt harm. 2 In an effort to provide evidence-based recom- mendations and tools to aid clinicians (...) Association • RxFiles PPI—proton pump inhibitor.Vol 63: may • mai 2017 | Canadian Family Physician • Le Médecin de famille canadien 363 Deprescribing proton pump inhibitors | Clinical Practice Guidelines caused by the PPI) and negative (such as recurrence of upper GI symptoms) patient-specific effects of PPI depre- scribing, particularly over the longer term, would be help- ful. Evaluating cost-effectiveness and long-term medical resource use is also important. Next steps The deprescribing team

2017 CPG Infobase

91. Management of Acute Myocardial Infarction in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation

. The two chairmen contributed equally to the document: Borja Ibanez, Director Clinical Research, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC), Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid, Spain; Department of Cardiology, IIS-Fundación Jiménez Díaz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain; and CIBERCV, Spain. Tel: +34 91 453.12.00 (ext: 4302), Fax: +34 91 453.12.45, E-mail: bibanez@cnic.es or bibanez@fjd.es. Stefan James, Professor of Cardiology, Department of Medical Sciences (...) Carlos III (CNIC), Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid, Spain; Department of Cardiology, IIS-Fundación Jiménez Díaz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain; and CIBERCV, Spain. Tel: +34 91 453.12.00 (ext: 4302), Fax: +34 91 453.12.45, E-mail: bibanez@cnic.es or bibanez@fjd.es. Stefan James, Professor of Cardiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Scientific Director UCR, Uppsala University and Sr. Interventional Cardiologist, Department of Cardiology Uppsala University Hospital UCR Uppsala Clinical

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2017 European Society of Cardiology

92. Asthma

— minor update. The range of dry powder inhaler devices included as prescriptions has been updated. Issued in February 2011. December 2010 — minor update. The Flixotide Diskhaler ® (fluticasone) range has been discontinued. The prescription has been removed. Issued in December 2010. October 2010 — minor update. Information on fitness to drive from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency's guidance for medical practitioners, At a glance guide to the current medical standards of fitness to drive has (...) . British Medical Journal. [ ] BMJ (2018) Improving the global diagnosis and management of asthma in children . British Medical Journal. [ ] Busse, W., et al. (2018) Combined analysis of asthma safety trails of long-acting ß 2 -agonists. The New England Journal of Medicine. [ ] NIHR (2018) Increasing inhaled steroids for short periods reduces asthma exacerbations. National Institute for Health Research [ ] Connett, G., Connett, L., and Thomas, M. (2019) Determining the reasons for poorly controlled

2017 Prodigy

93. Antiocoagulation - oral

of a bleeding complication in secondary care consists of stopping treatment and general haemostatic measures, such as mechanical compression and surgical haemostasis with bleeding control procedures, fluid replacement and haemodynamic support, blood products (packed red cells or fresh frozen plasma, depending on associated anaemia or coagulopathy), or platelets. People taking oral anticoagulants should be advised: To seek immediate medical advice if spontaneous bleeding occurs and does not stop, or recurs (...) . This includes bruising, bleeding gums, nosebleeds, prolonged bleeding from cuts, blood in the urine or stools, haemoptysis, subconjunctival haemorrhage, and vaginal bleeding in a postmenopausal woman. To seek medical advice if they get sudden severe back pain (which may indicate spontaneous retroperitoneal bleeding). Not to take over-the-counter medicines such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. What to do if there has been a missed dose or if a double dose has been taken. The duration of treatment

2017 Prodigy

94. Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease: Part 2: Pain and Symptom Management

Management Nausea and Vomiting Effective Date: February 22, 2017 Key Recommendations • Select anti-nausea medication based on the etiology of the nausea and vomiting. Assessment 1. Nausea and vomiting are common, but can be controlled with antiemetics. 2. Identify and discontinue medications that may be the cause. 3. Further assessment may include lab tests and imaging to investigate (e.g., GI tract disturbance, electrolyte/calcium imbalance, intracranial disease, and sepsis). 4. Good symptom control may (...) . Pharmacological: match treatment to cause (e.g., if opioid-induced, metoclopramide (sometimes IV or SC initially) and domperidone are most effective). Most drugs are covered by the BC Palliative Care Drug Plan, exc ept olanzapine and ondansetron (refer to Appendix B – Medications Used in Palliative Care for Nausea and Vomiting). 3. Consider pre-emptive use of anti-nauseates in opioid-naive patients. BCGuidelines.ca: Palliative Care for the Patient with Incurable Cancer or Advanced Disease Part 2: Pain

2017 Clinical Practice Guidelines and Protocols in British Columbia

95. CRACKCast Episode 149 – Aspirin and Nonsteroidal Agents

warrants IV glucose supplementation. NSAIDs: Most NSAID overdoses are asymptomatic or cause only minor symptoms. Ibuprofen, along with other propionic acid derivatives, has been associated with sporadic cases of aseptic meningitis. The management of NSAID overdose is supportive, and there is no specific antidote. Hemodialysis is reserved for patients with massive overdose and pH <7.1. Patients who have ingested a pyrazolone or fenamate require observation for possible seizures until 8 hours after (...) ingestion. Rosen’s In Perspective Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid, is widely consumed for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet effects… however salicylate toxicity is not a benign condition and causes a complex set of life-threatening metabolic derangements with significant morbidity and mortality. 20-30 people die every year from ASA overdoses. The very young and very old are at particular risk! It’s not just ASA that we worry about: other potential sources of salicylate toxicity include

2018 CandiEM

96. Erectile Dysfunction

Erectile Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Guideline - American Urological Association advertisement Toggle navigation About Us About the AUA Membership AUA Governance Industry Relations Education AUAUniversity Education Products & Resources Normal Histology and Important Histo-anatomic Structures Urinary Bladder Prostate Kidney Renovascular Diseases Andrenal Gland Testis Paratesticular Tumors Penis Retroperitoneum Cytology Online Learning For Medical Students Exams/LLL/Certifications Exam (...) is the cornerstone of the treatment and management of ED, a model that relies on the concepts of autonomy and respect for persons in the clinical encounter. It is also a process in which the patient and the clinician together determine the best course of therapy based on a discussion of the risks, benefits and desired outcome. Using this approach, all men should be informed of all treatment options that are not medically contraindicated to determine the appropriate treatment. Although many men may choose

2018 American Urological Association

97. Diagnostic evaluation of sexual dysfunction in the male partner in the setting of infertility: a committee opinion

with lifestyle modi?cations, substituting alternative medications in place of those that can exacerbate ED, and moving on to PDE5i in patients who have organic causes of ED such as spinal cord injuries, radical pelvic surgery, severe atherosclerosis, or those who fail lifestyle therapy or desire rapid improvement in their ED. Typically,thesemenmaybestartedonaPDE5itrial,with appropriate counseling about risk of priapism (de?ned as an erection lasting longer than 4 hours). Contraindications for PDE5i use (...) include use of nitrates and inadequate cardiac reserve for sexual activity requiring clearance by a cardiolo- gist.Further,thesemedicationsshouldbeusedwithcautionin menonanalphablocker astheycancauseanunsafedropin bloodpressure.SideeffectsofPDE5iagentsincludeheadache, facial?ushing,muscleaches,nasalcongestion,abluetingein vision, dizziness, dyspepsia, and priapism. Typical doses of PDE5iaresildena?l50–100mg,tadala?l5–20mg,vardena?l 10–20 mg, and avana?l50–200 mg. All of these drugs are expensive, $10

2018 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

98. Erectile Dysfunction

treatment options that are not medically contraindicated to determine the appropriate treatment. Although many men may choose to begin with the least invasive option, the Panel notes that it is valid for men to begin with any type of treatment, regardless of invasiveness or reversibility. Men also may choose to forego treatment. In each scenario, the clinician’s role is to ensure that the man and his partner have a full understanding of the benefits and risks/burdens of the various management strategies (...) ) Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc.® Guideline Statements: Evaluation and Diagnosis: 1. Men presenting with symptoms of ED should undergo a thorough medical, sexual, and psychosocial history; a physical examination; and selective laboratory testing. (Clinical Principle) 2. For the man with ED, validated questionnaires are recommended to assess the severity of ED, to measure treat- ment effectiveness, and to guide future management. (Expert Opinion) 3. Men should

2018 American Urological Association

99. Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Clinical Practice Guidelines: Joint Recommendations of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutritio

events cause one or multiple symptoms is often difficult (1,12). This is particularly true in nonverbal infants in whom defining trouble- some is problematic. Reported symptoms of infant GERD vary widely and may include excessive crying, back arching, regurgi- tation and irritability. Many of these symptoms, however, occur in all babies with or without GERD, making a definitive diagnosis challenging. Therefore, the degree of concern of parents is often the factor driving the need for a diagnosis (...) to be a prominent phenomenon in children who have other underlying medical conditions such as prematurity, neurologic impairment, and pulmonary problems, including cystic fibrosis. The present guideline was not intended Original studies, n = 16 - Massage therapy, n=1 - Feeding modifications, n=14 - Positioning therapy, n =1 Systematic reviews, n = 2 Records identified through database searching (n = 3068) Additional records identified through other sources (n = 11) Records screened Records after duplicates

2018 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

100. Deprescribing Proton Pump Inhibitors

drug”, spawning multiple imita- tors. Eventually this included (as patent extensions) the single enantiomers esomeprazole and dexlansoprazole. Prescription PPIs are approved for peptic ulcer disease (PUD), gastro- esophageal reflux (GERD), and non-ulcer dyspepsia. About 1 in 12 British Columbians receives a prescription in any year. 1 Over the counter omeprazole and esomeprazole are also approved for heartburn occurring on >2 days/week, achieving full acid suppressant effect in 1-4 days. 2 Most (...) people taking PPIs have not been endoscoped, so that “GERD” often refers to reflux or heartburn. Our previous reviews 3-9 of randomized clinical trial (RCT) evidence on PPIs concluded: • Over 8-12 weeks, PPIs are effective for GERD 3 and PUD 4 . • Patients treated effectively do not require chronic acid suppressive medications. 4 • Long-term PPIs are appropriate in relapsing severe erosive esophagitis. 3 • No PPI demonstrated superiority for GERD or symptoms related to PUD. 9 • No long-term RCTs

2018 Therapeutics Letter

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