How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

5,951 results for

Medication Induced Vomiting

by
...
Latest & greatest
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. 2016 MASCC and ESMO guideline update for the prevention of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and of nausea and vomiting in advanced cancer patients

2016 MASCC and ESMO guideline update for the prevention of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and of nausea and vomiting in advanced cancer patients We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. 2016 MASCC and ESMO guideline update for the prevention of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and of nausea and vomiting (...) in advanced cancer patients | Annals of Oncology | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation Close mobile search navigation Article navigation September 2016 Article Contents Article Navigation 2016 MASCC and ESMO guideline update for the prevention of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and of nausea and vomiting in advanced cancer patients F. Roila 1Medical Oncology, Santa Maria

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2016 International Society for Oral Oncology

2. Guideline for the prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric cancer patients: a focused update.

version: Dupuis LL, Boodhan S, Holdsworth M, Robinson PD, Hain R, Portwine C, O'Shaughnessy E, Sung L. Guideline for the prevention of acute nausea and vomiting due to antineoplastic medication in pediatric cancer patients. Toronto (ON): Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario (POGO); 2012. 199 p. [129 references] This guideline meets NGC's 2013 (revised) inclusion criteria. Available from the . The following is available: Supplemental appendix. Guideline for the prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced (...) Guideline for the prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric cancer patients: a focused update. Guideline for the prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric cancer patients: a focused update. | National Guideline Clearinghouse success fail JUN 09 2017 2018 2019 14 Apr 2018 - 12 Jul 2018 COLLECTED BY Organization: Formed in 2009, the Archive Team (not to be confused with the archive.org Archive-It Team) is a rogue archivist collective

2017 National Guideline Clearinghouse (partial archive)

3. A review of oral cannabinoids and medical marijuana for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a focus on pharmacokinetic variability and pharmacodynamics (PubMed)

A review of oral cannabinoids and medical marijuana for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a focus on pharmacokinetic variability and pharmacodynamics Oral cannabinoids (i.e., dronabinol, nabilone) containing the active component of marijuana, delta(Δ)9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), are available for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in patients with cancer who have failed to adequately respond to conventional antiemetic therapy. The aim (...) of this article is to provide an overview of the efficacy, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and safety of oral cannabinoids for patients with CINV.A PubMed search of the English-language literature available through 4 January 2017 was conducted to identify relevant articles for inclusion in the review.Oral cannabinoids have been shown to have similar or improved efficacy compared with conventional antiemetics for the resolution of nausea and/or vomiting in patients with cancer. However, oral THC

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology

4. Medical interventions for the prevention of platinum-induced hearing loss in children with cancer. (PubMed)

Medical interventions for the prevention of platinum-induced hearing loss in children with cancer. Platinum-based therapy, including cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin or a combination of these, is used to treat a variety of paediatric malignancies. One of the most significant adverse effects is the occurrence of hearing loss or ototoxicity. In an effort to prevent this ototoxicity, different otoprotective medical interventions have been studied. This review is the third update of a previously (...) published Cochrane Review.To assess the efficacy of medical interventions to prevent hearing loss and to determine possible effects of these interventions on antitumour efficacy, toxicities other than hearing loss and quality of life in children with cancer treated with platinum-based therapy as compared to placebo, no additional treatment or another protective medical intervention.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed) and Embase (Ovid) to 8 January 2019. We

2019 Cochrane

5. MASCC and ESMO Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

MASCC and ESMO Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention of Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting 2016MASCCandESMOguidelineupdateforthe preventionofchemotherapy-andradiotherapy-induced nauseaandvomitingandofnauseaandvomitingin advancedcancerpatients F.Roila 1 ,A.Molassiotis 2 ,J.Herrstedt 3 ,M.Aapro 4 ,R.J.Gralla 5 ,E.Bruera 6 ,R.A.Clark-Snow 7 , L.L.Dupuis 8 ,L.H.Einhorn 9 ,P.Feyer 10 ,P.J.Hesketh 11 ,K.Jordan 12 ,I.Olver 13 ,B.L.Rapoport 14 , J.Roscoe 15 ,C.H.Ruhlmann 3 (...) ,TheNetherlands introduction Despite the considerable progress achieved in the last 30 years, vomiting and, especially, nausea, continue to be twoof the most distressing side-effects of cancer chemotherapy. In the late 1990s, several professional organisations published recommen- dations on the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis in patients sub- mitted to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. The European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC

2017 European Society for Medical Oncology

6. Olanzapine for the Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: A Comparative Study From Sudan (PubMed)

Olanzapine for the Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: A Comparative Study From Sudan Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a distressing adverse effect. Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (NK1RA)-containing regimens are the standard regimens for CINV prophylaxis in patients with cancer receiving highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC or MEC). NK1RA agents are expensive and were not registered in Sudan. Recently, regimens containing olanzapine (...) , the available and affordable medication in Sudan, were introduced as another option. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of an olanzapine-containing regimen with the antiemetic regimen that was currently used in our institute for CINV prophylaxis in HEC/MEC settings.The study prospectively compared an olanzapine-containing regimen (acute phase: olanzapine, ondansetron, dexamethasone; delayed phase: olanzapine, ondansetron) with an ondansetron/dexamethasone regimen (acute phase: ondansetron

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2018 Journal of global oncology

7. American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation

American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation - Gastroenterology Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search AGA Journals Search Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 156, Issue 1, Pages 218–226 American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid (...) of opioid-induced constipation. The guideline was developed by the AGA Institute’s Clinical Guidelines Committee and approved by the AGA Governing Board. It is accompanied by a technical review that is a compilation of clinical evidence from which these recommendations were formulated. x 1 Hanson, B., Siddique, S.M., Scarlett, Y. et al. American Gastroenterological Association Institute Technical Review on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation. Gastroenterology . 2019 ; 156 : 229–253

2019 American Gastroenterological Association Institute

8. Effect of Persian Medicine Remedy on Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Breast Cancer: A Double Blind, Randomized, Crossover Clinical Trial. (PubMed)

Effect of Persian Medicine Remedy on Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Breast Cancer: A Double Blind, Randomized, Crossover Clinical Trial. Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a side effect, and has negative effect on quality of life and continuation of chemotherapy. Despite new regimen and drugs, the problems still remain and standard guidelines, effective treatment and supportive care for refractory CINV are still not yet established. Persian medicine, the old Iranian (...) medical school, offer Persumac (prepared from Rhus Coriaria and Bunium Persicum Boiss).The specific objectives were to assess the effect of Persumac on the number and severity of nausea and vomiting in refractory CINV in acute and delayed phase.This randomized, double blind, crossover clinical trial study was carried out on 93 patients with breast cancer and refractory CINV, who received outpatient high emetogenic chemotherapy in Imam Reza hospital, Mashhad, Iran from October 2015 to May 2016

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2017 Electronic physician

9. Medication Induced Vomiting

Medication Induced Vomiting Medication Induced Vomiting Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Medication Induced Vomiting (...) Medication Induced Vomiting Aka: Medication Induced Vomiting , Vomiting due to Medication From Related Chapters II. Causes: Drug Toxicity Hypervitaminosis Toxicity Narcotic or Acute s s III. Causes: Vomiting as Adverse Effect at Therapeutic Dosage s (local GI irritation) s (local GI irritation) and other s Cardiovascular medications s Antihypertensives s s s s L-Dopa Antibiotics s Antituberculous medications Neurologic medications Antiparkinsonian medications Anticonvulsants Chemotherapeutic medications

2018 FP Notebook

10. Oral Ginger for the Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Pediatric Patients

Oral Ginger for the Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Pediatric Patients TITLE: Oral Ginger for the Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Pediatric Patients: Clinical Effectiveness and Safety DATE: 15 August 2014 RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1. What is the clinical effectiveness of oral ginger for the management of chemotherapy- induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in pediatric patients? 2. What is the clinical evidence on the safety and harms of oral ginger (...) for the management of CINV in pediatric patients? KEY FINDINGS One randomized controlled trial was identified regarding the clinical effectiveness of oral ginger for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in pediatric patients. METHODS A limited literature search was conducted on key resources including PubMed, The Cochrane Library (2014, Issue 8), University of York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) databases, Canadian and major international health technology agencies, as well

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

11. Efficacy of Thalidomide in Preventing Delayed Nausea and Vomiting Induced by Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy: A Randomized, Multicenter, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase III Trial (CLOG1302 study)

Efficacy of Thalidomide in Preventing Delayed Nausea and Vomiting Induced by Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy: A Randomized, Multicenter, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase III Trial (CLOG1302 study) Purpose We examined the efficacy and safety of thalidomide (THD) for the prevention of delayed nausea and vomiting in patients who received highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). Patients and Methods In a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, phase III trial, chemotherapy-naive patients (...) with cancer who were scheduled to receive HEC that contained cisplatin or cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin/epirubincin ≥ 50 mg/m2 regimens were randomly assigned to a THD group (100 mg twice daily on days 1 to 5) or placebo group, both with palonosetron (0.25 mg on day 1) and dexamethasone (12 mg on day 1; 8 mg on days 2 to 4). Primary end point was complete response to vomiting-no emesis or use of rescue medication-in the delayed phase (25 to 120 h). Nausea and anorexia on days 1 to 5 were evaluated by the 4

2017 EvidenceUpdates

12. Study protocol for an open-label, single-arm, multicentre phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined triplet therapy and olanzapine for prevention of carboplatin-induced nausea and vomiting in gynaecological cancer patients. (PubMed)

Study protocol for an open-label, single-arm, multicentre phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined triplet therapy and olanzapine for prevention of carboplatin-induced nausea and vomiting in gynaecological cancer patients. Carboplatin (CBDCA) administered at a dosage of 4 mg/mL/min or more area under the blood concentration-time curve (AUC) is considered to be ranked as the highest chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) risk of the moderately emetogenic (...) chemotherapy agents. The complete response (CR) rate for preventing overall CINV, defined as no emetic episodes and no use of rescue medication, for standard triplet antiemetic therapy (5-HT3RA, 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonist; NK1RA, neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist; DEX, dexamethasone) was approximately 60% in gynaecological cancer patients receiving CBDCA-based therapy. Further improvement in antiemetic treatment is needed to optimise care. This trial is to evaluate the efficacy and safety

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 BMJ open

13. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Olanzapine for the Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Moderately Emetogenic Chemotherapy: Results of the Korean South West Oncolog (PubMed)

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Olanzapine for the Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Moderately Emetogenic Chemotherapy: Results of the Korean South West Oncolog Data on the efficacy of olanzapine in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) are limited. This study aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of olanzapine versus placebo in controlling nausea and vomiting in patients (...) receiving MEC.We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to determine whether olanzapine can reduce the frequency of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) and improve the quality of life (QOL) in patients receiving palonosetron and dexamethasone as prophylaxis for MEC-induced nausea and vomiting. The primary end point was complete response for the acute phase (0-24 hours after chemotherapy). The secondary end points were complete response for the delayed (24-120 hours

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 Cancer research and treatment : official journal of Korean Cancer Association

14. Intravenous fosaprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced vomiting in children: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III randomized trial. (PubMed)

Intravenous fosaprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced vomiting in children: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III randomized trial. Fosaprepitant is a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, approved for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The data on the use of fosaprepitant in children are limited and therefore we conducted a phase III randomized controlled trial.Children aged 1-12 years scheduled to receive moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (...) who achieved a complete response (CR), defined as no vomiting, no retching, and no use of rescue medication, during the 24-120 hours (delayed phase) after administration of the last dose of chemotherapy. Secondary end points were the proportion of patients who achieved a CR during the acute phase (0-24 hours) and overall after administration of the last dose of chemotherapy.One-hundred-sixty-three patients were analyzed (81 in the fosaprepitant arm and 82 in the placebo arm). CR rates were

2019 Pediatric blood & cancer

15. A dose-finding randomized Phase II study of oral netupitant in combination with palonosetron .75 mg intravenous for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in Japanese patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. (PubMed)

A dose-finding randomized Phase II study of oral netupitant in combination with palonosetron .75 mg intravenous for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in Japanese patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Netupitant is a novel, selective neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist used for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, a distressing side effect of chemotherapy. This double-blind, randomized, Phase II study investigated the dose-response of oral (...) chemotherapy administration) complete response (CR) rate (no emesis, no rescue medication) was 64.2%, 60.0% and 54.9% in the 30-, 100- and 300-mg arms, respectively, without statistical significance for dose-response. The safety profile of netupitant was comparable in the three arms. The plasma concentrations of netupitant and its metabolites increased with the dose increase from 30 mg to 300 mg.No dose-response relationship of netupitant in terms of overall CR rate was observed in this study. Netupitant

2019 Japanese journal of clinical oncology

16. Prevention of Opioid-Induced Nausea and Vomiting During Treatment of Moderate to Severe Acute Pain: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial Comparing CL-108 (Hydrocodone 7.5 mg/Acetaminophen 325 mg/Rapid-Release, Low-Dose Promethazine 12.5 mg) with Conventi (PubMed)

Prevention of Opioid-Induced Nausea and Vomiting During Treatment of Moderate to Severe Acute Pain: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial Comparing CL-108 (Hydrocodone 7.5 mg/Acetaminophen 325 mg/Rapid-Release, Low-Dose Promethazine 12.5 mg) with Conventi To evaluate the prevention of opioid-induced nausea and vomiting (OINV) and the relief of moderate to severe acute pain by CL-108, a novel drug combining a low-dose antiemetic (rapid-release promethazine 12.5 mg) with hydrocodone 7.5 mg (...) /acetaminophen 325 mg (HC/APAP) was used.This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled multidose study. After surgical extraction of two or more impacted third molar teeth (including at least one mandibular impaction), 466 patients with moderate to severe pain (measured on a categorical pain intensity scale [PI-CAT]) were randomized to CL-108, HC/APAP, or placebo. Over the next 24 hours, patients used the PI-CAT to assess pain at regular intervals whereas nausea, vomiting

2019 Pain Medicine

17. Antiemetic medication for prevention and treatment of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in childhood. (PubMed)

Antiemetic medication for prevention and treatment of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in childhood. Nausea and vomiting are still a problem for children undergoing treatment for malignancies despite new antiemetic therapies. Optimising antiemetic regimens could improve quality of life by reducing nausea, vomiting and associated clinical problems.To assess the effectiveness and adverse events of pharmacological interventions in controlling anticipatory, acute and delayed nausea (...) control of vomiting (pooled RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.80 to 1.07). No other pooled analyses were possible.Narrative synthesis suggests 5-HT(3) antagonists are more effective than older antiemetic agents even when combined with a steroid. Cannabinoids are probably effective but produce frequent side effects.Our overall knowledge of the most effective antiemetics to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in childhood is incomplete. Future research should be undertaken in consultation with children

Full Text available with Trip Pro

2010 Cochrane

18. Prevention of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in adults: netupitant/palonosetron

degree of emetogenicity. People can also vary in their susceptibility to drug-induced nausea and vomiting; those affected more often include women, people under 50 years of age, people with anxiety and those who have motion sickness. Guidelines including the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) antiemetic guidelines recommend regimens including both a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist and a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (...) Prevention of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in adults: netupitant/palonosetron Pre Prev vention of chemother ention of chemotherap apy induced nausea and y induced nausea and v vomiting in adults: netupitant/palonosetron omiting in adults: netupitant/palonosetron Evidence summary Published: 1 March 2016 nice.org.uk/guidance/esnm69 pathways K Ke ey points from the e y points from the evidence vidence The content of this evidence summary was up-to-date in March 2016. See summaries

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Advice

19. Assessment of nausea and vomiting in children

reason for parents and caregivers to seek medical attention. As a result, they have a significant impact on healthcare costs. Definitions Nausea is defined as the subjective unpleasant sensation of imminent vomiting. It is frequently accompanied by autonomic symptoms such as dizziness, pallor, and sweating. Vomiting is defined as the vigorous oral expulsion of the gastric or intestinal contents associated with increased intra-abdominal pressure. Oral regurgitation refers to the effortless, usually (...) , including: Sondheimer JM. Vomiting. In: Walker WA, Goulet O, Kleinman RE, et al (Eds). Walker's pediatric gastrointestinal disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, management. 4th ed. Ontario, Canada. BD Decker Inc; 2004:203. Stimulation of chemoreceptors situated in the area postrema (medullary structure located in the fourth ventricle of the brain) Movement-induced stimulation of the labyrinth Irritation or over-distension of the mechanically sensitive vagal afferents in the gastrointestinal tract

2018 BMJ Best Practice

20. Assessment of nausea and vomiting in children

reason for parents and caregivers to seek medical attention. As a result, they have a significant impact on healthcare costs. Definitions Nausea is defined as the subjective unpleasant sensation of imminent vomiting. It is frequently accompanied by autonomic symptoms such as dizziness, pallor, and sweating. Vomiting is defined as the vigorous oral expulsion of the gastric or intestinal contents associated with increased intra-abdominal pressure. Oral regurgitation refers to the effortless, usually (...) , including: Sondheimer JM. Vomiting. In: Walker WA, Goulet O, Kleinman RE, et al (Eds). Walker's pediatric gastrointestinal disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, management. 4th ed. Ontario, Canada. BD Decker Inc; 2004:203. Stimulation of chemoreceptors situated in the area postrema (medullary structure located in the fourth ventricle of the brain) Movement-induced stimulation of the labyrinth Irritation or over-distension of the mechanically sensitive vagal afferents in the gastrointestinal tract

2018 BMJ Best Practice

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>