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Medication Causes of Dyspepsia

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1. Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review

, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA Nancy Lane, M.D. Director and Distinguished Professor Center for Musculoskeletal Health and Department of Internal Medicine University of California at Davis, School of Medicine Sacramento, California Jasvinder Singh, M.D., M.P.H. Division of Rheumatology University of Alabama Birmingham, AL vii Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review Structured Abstract Objective. To summarize the effects of long-term (...) Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 218 RComparative Effectiveness Review Number 218 Long-Term Drug Therapy and Drug Holidays for Osteoporosis Fracture Prevention: A Systematic Review Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600

2019 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

2. Medication Causes of Dyspepsia

Medication Causes of Dyspepsia Medication Causes of Dyspepsia Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Medication Causes (...) of Dyspepsia Medication Causes of Dyspepsia Aka: Medication Causes of Dyspepsia , Gastric Irritants From Related Chapters II. Causes: Gastric Irritants (risks for Peptic Ulcer Disease) S See Coffee and other sources abuse s (e.g. ) III. Causes: Herbal preparations causing Dyspepsia Gingko White willow IV. Causes: Medications causing Dyspepsia ( ) ( ) Antiinflammatory medications s s Cisapride (Propulsid) s ( ) ( ) ( ) s ( ) chloride ( ) V. References Feldman (1998) Sleisenger and Fordtran's GI, p. 106-8

2018 FP Notebook

3. Dyspepsia - unidentified cause

and associated stress, anxiety, or depression. Reviewing the person's medication, including drugs that can cause or exacerbate dyspepsia, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Considering an alternative diagnosis. Considering arranging a full blood count, to check for anaemia and/or a raised platelet count, which may suggest underlying malignancy. Initial management of a person with unexplained dyspepsia should include: Offering advice on lifestyle modification. Managing any associated (...) . Alcohol consumption — see the CKS topic on for more information on recommended limits. Assess for stress, anxiety, and depression which may worsen symptoms. See the CKS topics on and for more information. Review the person's medication, and ask about: Any over-the-counter medication such as antacids and/or alginates that have been tried for symptom relief. Drugs that can cause or exacerbate dyspepsia, such as alpha-blockers, anticholinergics, aspirin, benzodiazepines, beta-blockers, bisphosphonates

2018 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

4. Appropriate prescribing of psychotropic medication for non-cognitive symptoms in people with dementia

, aggression, pacing, walking about, altered sexual behaviour, changed sleep patterns, and appetite disturbances. Non-pharmacological Interventions such as music therapy, relaxation, distraction techniques, and massage, or with cognitive and behavioural interventions, as opposed to pharmacological/medication interventions. Off label The use of medications for an unapproved indication or in an unapproved age group, dosage, or route of administration. Parkinson’s disease dementia The brain changes caused (...) Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation GDG Guideline Development Group GDP Global Domestic Product MCI Mild Cognitive Impairment MHBC Ministry of Health British Columbia MHRA Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency NCEC National Clinical Effectiveness Committee NHMRC National Health and Medical Research Council NHS National Health Service NICE National Institute for Health and Care Excellence NPI Neuropsychiatric Inventory PBS Pharmaceutical Benefit Scheme PDD

2019 National Clinical Guidelines (Ireland)

5. American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation Full Text available with Trip Pro

., Dorn, S.D. et al. American Gastroenterological Association medical position statement on constipation. Gastroenterology . 2013 ; 144 : 211–217 | | | | | Once a diagnosis of OIC has been confirmed and other potential causes of constipation are excluded, the recommendations here can help guide appropriate evidence-based management. This guideline focuses on the medical management of OIC. Therefore, it does not address the role of psychological therapy, alternative medicine approaches, surgery (...) control, the AGA recommends escalation of therapy to PAMORA drugs with high- or moderate-quality evidence of efficacy, namely naldemedine and naloxegol. The AGA also conditionally recommends use of methylnatrexone. Due to insufficient evidence, the AGA did not issue a recommendation regarding use of either lubiprostone or prucalopride in OIC. The recommendations are similar to those proposed by recent clinical guidelines related to OIC published by the American Academy of Pain Medicine x 25 Muller

2019 American Gastroenterological Association Institute

6. Assessment of dyspepsia

Pancreatic tumours/cancers Obstruction of the hepatobiliary tract from stone, stricture, or tumour Hypercalcaemia Abdominal wall pain Contributors Authors Clinical Adjunct Professor School of Medicine and Public Health University of Wisconsin Madison WI Disclosures NV has consulted for Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, Otsuka Pharmaceutical, Shire Pharmaceuticals, and Astellas Pharma. He has received research grants from Impleo Medical and Allergan. Dr Nimish Vakil would like to gratefully acknowledge Dr Nigel W (...) to be individualised. World Gastroenterology Organisation. World Gastroenterology Organisation global guidelines: coping with common GI symptoms in the community. May 2013 [internet publication]. http://www.worldgastroenterology.org/guidelines/global-guidelines/common-gi-symptoms/common-gi-symptoms-english The nomenclature for dyspepsia is confusing. This is largely because some medical organisations include all UGI symptoms in the term dyspepsia, then separate patients with symptoms suggesting GORD

2018 BMJ Best Practice

7. Assessment of dyspepsia

Pancreatic tumours/cancers Obstruction of the hepatobiliary tract from stone, stricture, or tumour Hypercalcaemia Abdominal wall pain Contributors Authors Clinical Adjunct Professor School of Medicine and Public Health University of Wisconsin Madison WI Disclosures NV has consulted for Ironwood Pharmaceuticals, Otsuka Pharmaceutical, Shire Pharmaceuticals, and Astellas Pharma. He has received research grants from Impleo Medical and Allergan. Dr Nimish Vakil would like to gratefully acknowledge Dr Nigel W (...) to be individualised. World Gastroenterology Organisation. World Gastroenterology Organisation global guidelines: coping with common GI symptoms in the community. May 2013 [internet publication]. http://www.worldgastroenterology.org/guidelines/global-guidelines/common-gi-symptoms/common-gi-symptoms-english The nomenclature for dyspepsia is confusing. This is largely because some medical organisations include all UGI symptoms in the term dyspepsia, then separate patients with symptoms suggesting GORD

2018 BMJ Best Practice

8. Effectiveness of 7-Day and 14-Day Moxifloxacin-Dexlansoprazole Based Triple Therapy and Probiotic Supplement for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication in Thai Patients with Non-Ulcer Dyspepsia: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effectiveness of 7-Day and 14-Day Moxifloxacin-Dexlansoprazole Based Triple Therapy and Probiotic Supplement for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication in Thai Patients with Non-Ulcer Dyspepsia: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is important cause of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Moxifloxacin is effective antibiotic for treatment for H. pylori. However, there were limited studies as first line therapy. Probiotics had been shown (...) to decrease therapy-related side-effect and increase eradication rate. Aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of moxifloxacin-dexlansoprazole based triple therapy with probiotic for H. pylori treatment in Thailand. Methods: Patients with H. pylori infected gastritis were randomized to receive 7- or 14-day moxifloxacin-dexlansoprazole based triple therapy with probiotic or placebo. Regimen consisted of 60 mg dexlansoprazole twice daily, 400mg moxifloxacin once daily, 1g clarithromycin MR once daily

2017 Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention : APJCP Controlled trial quality: uncertain

9. Effectiveness of Once-daily Dose Regimen of 7-day and 14-day High Dose Rabeprazole-levofloxacin Based Quadruple Therapy for H. Pylori Eradication in Thai Patients With Non-ulcer Dyspepsia

Effectiveness of Once-daily Dose Regimen of 7-day and 14-day High Dose Rabeprazole-levofloxacin Based Quadruple Therapy for H. Pylori Eradication in Thai Patients With Non-ulcer Dyspepsia Effectiveness of Once-daily Dose Regimen of 7-day and 14-day High Dose Rabeprazole-levofloxacin Based Quadruple Therapy for H. Pylori Eradication in Thai Patients With Non-ulcer Dyspepsia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration (...) or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Effectiveness of Once-daily Dose Regimen of 7-day and 14-day High Dose Rabeprazole-levofloxacin Based Quadruple Therapy for H. Pylori Eradication in Thai Patients With Non-ulcer Dyspepsia The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor

2017 Clinical Trials

10. Management of Dyspepsia

) ( 72 ) and a signifi cant propor- tion of patients might prefer not to take antidepressant medication. In contrast to Statements 5 and 6 above, it should be noted that we recommend TCA before prokinetic for treatment of FD based on the superior evidence for TCA in this indication. STATEMENT 10. WE SUGGEST FUNCTIONAL DYSPEPSIA PATIENTS NOT RESPONDING TO PPI, H. PYLORI ERADICATION THERAPY OR TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANT THERAPY SHOULD BE OFFERED PROKINETIC THERAPY Conditional recommendation, very low (...) common in women, smokers, and those taking non-steroidal anti-infl ammatory drugs ( 4 ). Patients with dyspepsia have a normal life expectancy ( 5 ), however, symptoms negatively impact on quality of life ( 6,7 ) and there is a signifi cant economic impact to the health service and society ( 8 ). Dyspepsia is estimated to cost the US health care service over $18 billion per annum ( 8 ) and societal costs are likely to be double this ( 9 ) with 2–5% ( refs 7,9 ) having time off work because

2017 American College of Gastroenterology

11. Dyspepsia

of patients might prefer not to take antidepressant medication. In contrast to Statements 5 and 6 above, it should be noted that we recommend TCA before prokinetic for treatment of FD based on the superior evidence for TCA in this indication. STATEMENT 10. WE SUGGEST FUNCTIONAL DYSPEPSIA PATIENTS NOT RESPONDING TO PPI, H. PYLORI ERADICATION THERAPY OR TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANT THERAPY SHOULD BE OFFERED PROKINETIC THERAPY Conditional recommendation, very low quality evidence Patients with FD oft en have (...) , smokers, and those taking non-steroidal anti-infl ammatory drugs ( 4 ). Patients with dyspepsia have a normal life expectancy ( 5 ), however, symptoms negatively impact on quality of life ( 6,7 ) and there is a signifi cant economic impact to the health service and society ( 8 ). Dyspepsia is estimated to cost the US health care service over $18 billion per annum ( 8 ) and societal costs are likely to be double this ( 9 ) with 2–5% ( refs 7,9 ) having time off work because of symptoms. Cost-eff ective

2017 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology

12. Neuropathic pain - drug treatment

Neuropathic pain - drug treatment Neuropathic pain - drug treatment - NICE CKS Share Neuropathic pain - drug treatment: Summary Neuropathic pain is a symptom that develops as a result of damage to, or dysfunction of, the nervous system. The pain may be constant or intermittent, and it is typically described as shooting, stabbing, burning, tingling, numb, prickling, or itching. The causes of neuropathic pain are complex and diverse and include diabetic neuropathy, trigeminal neuralgia, stroke (...) , spinal cord injury, and multiple sclerosis. In many cases, it is not possible to completely cure the underlying disease or lesion or to reverse the neurological changes. Consequently, neuropathic pain is usually persistent in these cases. The general principles for prescribing drug treatment for neuropathic pain include considering: Contraindications and potential adverse effects, especially for people with comorbid conditions. Interactions with other medications. Comorbid conditions that may benefit

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

13. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia in adults: investigation and management

, which should be documented. See the General Medical Council's Good practice in prescribing and managing medicines and devices for further information. Where recommendations have been made for the use of drugs outside their licensed indications ('off-label use'), these drugs are marked with a footnote in the recommendations. Specific dosage information on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is detailed in appendix A. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia in adults: investigation and management (...) immediately (on the same day) to a specialist. [2004] [2004] (Also see acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding [NICE clinical guideline 141].) 1.3.2 Review medications for possible causes of dyspepsia (for example, calcium antagonists, nitrates, theophyllines, bisphosphonates, corticosteroids and non- steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]). In people needing referral, suspend NSAID use. [2004] [2004] 1.3.3 Think about the possibility of cardiac or biliary disease as part of the differential diagnosis

2014 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

14. Dyspepsia Causes

sampling from a Bing search on the term "Dyspepsia Causes." Click on the image (or right click) to open the source website in a new browser window. Related Studies (from Trip Database) Ontology: Dyspepsia (C0013395) Definition (MEDLINEPLUS) Nearly everyone has had indigestion at one time. It's a feeling of discomfort or a burning feeling in your upper abdomen. You may have or belch and feel bloated. You may also feel nauseated, or even throw up. You might get indigestion from eating too much or too (...) fast, eating high-fat foods, or eating when you're stressed. Smoking, drinking too much alcohol, using some medicines, being tired, and having ongoing stress can also cause indigestion or make it worse. Sometimes the cause is a problem with the digestive tract, like an or . Avoiding foods and situations that seem to cause it may help. Because indigestion can be a sign of a more serious problem, see your health care provider if it lasts for more than two weeks or if you have severe pain or other

2018 FP Notebook

15. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guidelines for Comprehensive Medical Care of Patients with Obesity

. The presented recommendations may not be appropriate in all situations. Any decision by practitioners to apply these guidelines must be made in light of local resources and individual patient circumstances. From 1 Professor and Chair, Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Director, UAB Diabetes Research Center, GRECC Investigator & Staff Physician, Birmingham VA Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama; 2 Director, Metabolic Support, Clinical Professor of Medicine, Division (...) School of Medicine, Internal Medicine, Endocrinology, Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology, New Haven, Connecticut; 7 Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Diabetes Obesity & Metabolic Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; 8 Assistant Clinical Professor, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY, ProHealth Care Associates, Division of Endocrinology, Lake Success, New York; 9 Center for Weight Management, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Scripps Clinic, San Diego, California. Address

2016 American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists

16. Management of Opioid Therapy (OT) for Chronic Pain

clinicians or specialists to study and consider the latest information on opioid therapy (OT) and how and whether to incorporate that information or recommendations into their practice. It can be used to provide specific information to guide a patient encounter, such as looking up the dosing of a medication used less frequently or the meaning of the urine drug testing (UDT) result. The section on tapering and its accompanying appendix can be used to assist in the development of a framework for guiding (...) prescriptions were still written in 2012.[11] The increase in opioid prescribing is matched by a parallel increase in morbidity, mortality, opioid-related overdose death rates, and substance use disorders (SUD) treatment admissions from 1999 to 2008.[12,13] In 2009, drug overdose became the leading cause of injury-related death in the U.S., surpassing deaths from traffic accidents.[14] In 2014, 1.9 million Americans were affected by an OUD related to non-medical use of prescription pain relievers,[15

2017 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

17. Functional dyspepsia: new insights into pathogenesis and therapy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Functional dyspepsia: new insights into pathogenesis and therapy One in 10 people suffer from functional dyspepsia (FD), a clinical syndrome comprising chronic bothersome early satiety, or postprandial fullness, or epigastric pain or burning. Postprandial distress syndrome (PDS, comprising early satiety and/or postprandial fullness) and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) are increasingly accepted as valid clinical entities, based on new insights into the pathophysiology and the results of clinical (...) is considered to be causally linked to dyspepsia although only a minority will respond to eradication. In those with EPS, acid suppression therapy is a first line therapy; consider a H2 blocker even if proton pump inhibitor fails. In PDS, a prokinetic is preferred. Second line therapy includes administration of a tricyclic antidepressant in low doses, or mirtazapine, but not a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

2016 The Korean journal of internal medicine

18. A Phase 3 Comparison of Platinum-Based Therapy With TSR-042 and Niraparib Versus Standard of Care Platinum-Based Therapy as First-Line Treatment of Stage III or IV Nonmucinous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian Cancer Treatment With Niraparib Plus TSR-042) Study: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase 3 Comparison of Platinum-Based Therapy With TSR-042 and Niraparib Versus Standard of Care Platinum-Based Therapy as First-Line Treatment of Stage III or IV Nonmucinous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Actual Study Start Date : October 24, 2018 Estimated Primary Completion Date : November 30, 2021 Estimated Study Completion Date : July 31, 2023 Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine related (...) -L2). Outcome Measures Go to Primary Outcome Measures : Progression Free Survival [ Time Frame: Up to 5 years ] To compare the progression free survival of patients with Stage III or IV nonmucinous epithelial ovarian cancer treated with platinum-based therapy, TSR-042, and niraparib to standard of care platinum-based therapy as first-line treatment. Progression free survival is defined as the time from treatment randomization to the earlier date of assessment of progression or death by any cause

2018 Clinical Trials

19. Medication Causes of Dyspepsia

Medication Causes of Dyspepsia Medication Causes of Dyspepsia Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Medication Causes (...) of Dyspepsia Medication Causes of Dyspepsia Aka: Medication Causes of Dyspepsia , Gastric Irritants From Related Chapters II. Causes: Gastric Irritants (risks for Peptic Ulcer Disease) S See Coffee and other sources abuse s (e.g. ) III. Causes: Herbal preparations causing Dyspepsia Gingko White willow IV. Causes: Medications causing Dyspepsia ( ) ( ) Antiinflammatory medications s s Cisapride (Propulsid) s ( ) ( ) ( ) s ( ) chloride ( ) V. References Feldman (1998) Sleisenger and Fordtran's GI, p. 106-8

2015 FP Notebook

20. Teprenone improves gastric mucosal injury and dyspeptic symptoms in long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug users. (Abstract)

Teprenone improves gastric mucosal injury and dyspeptic symptoms in long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug users. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a major cause of gastric mucosal lesions. In China, teprenone is frequently prescribed as a mucoprotective agent, but the literature regarding their efficacy is limited. Our purpose was to address the effects of teprenone on long-term NSAID-associated gastric mucosal lesions.This study examined 369 patients taking NSAIDs (...) treatment, as well as in the teprenone group receiving other NSAIDs treatment (P < 0.05).Teprenone may be an effective treatment choice of gastric mucosal injuries and dyspepsia symptoms in patients who used NSAIDs chronically without H. pylori infection or history of gastroduodenal ulcer.© 2019 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

2019 Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

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