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Management of Severe Head Injury

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101. Methodology of the Guidelines for the Management of Acute Cervical Spine and Spinal Cord Injuries

; 49 : 407 – 498 . 2. Rosenberg J , Greenberg MK Practice parameters: strategies for survival into the nineties . Neurology . 1992 ; 42 ( 5 ): 1110 – 1115 . 3. Field M , Lohr K Clinical Practice Guidelines: Directions for a New Program—Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines: Institute of Medicine . Washington, DC : National Academy Press ; 1990 . 4. Bullock R , Chesnut RM , Clifton G , et al. Guidelines for the management of severe head injury: Brain Trauma (...) of these guidelines, as well as several other neurosurgical guideline documents. – The levels of recommendations as used in the previous iteration of the “Guidelines for the Management of Acute Cervical Spine and Spinal Cord Injuries,” which are derived from the classes of evidence listed above, are related to the certainty that a clinician has that the evidence is strong enough to support the recommendation(s) as follows: Standards: Reflection of a high degree of clinical certainty Guidelines: Reflection

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

102. Evidence-based approaches to the management of cognitive and behavioral impairments following pediatric brain injury

, Juttler E, Unterberg A, Hacke W. Decompressive surgery for severe brain edema. J. Intensive Care Med. 24(3),168–178 ( 2009 ). , 20 Guerguerian A, Milly Lo TY, Hutchison JS. Clinical management and functional neuromonitoring in traumatic brain injury in children. Curr. Opin. Pediatr. 21,1–8 ( 2009 ). , 21 Philip S, Udomphorn Y, Kirkham FJ, Vavilala MS. Cerebrovascular pathopysiology in pediatric traumatic brain injury. J. Trauma Inj. Infect. Crit. Care 67(2),128–134 ( 2009 ). , 22 Beauchamp MH, Babl FE (...) CE, Adelson PD. Neurobehavioral effects of amantadine after pediatric traumatic brain injury. J. Head Trauma. Rehabil. 20(5),450–463 ( 2005 ). , 38 Patrick PD, Buck ML, Conaway MR, Blackman JA. The use of dopamine enhancing medications with children in low response states following brain injury. Brain Inj. 17(6),497–506 ( 2003 ). , , 39 Trovato M, Slomine B, Pidock F, Christensen J. The efficacy of donepezil hydrochloride on memory functioning in three adolescents with severe traumatic brain

2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

103. Systematic Review - Relationship of Deployment-related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Depressive Disorders, Substance Use Disorders, Suicidal Ideation, and Anxiety Disorders

Synthesis Program ii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This topic was developed in response to a nomination by Stuart Hoffman, PhD, Scientific Program Manager for Brain Injury and Senior Scientific Advisor for Brain Injury; Ralph DePalma, MD, FACS, Special Operations Officer; and David X. Cifu, MD, National Director of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Program Office and Chair, VHA TBI Advisory Committee, for use by the VHA TBI Advisory Committee to inform clinical practice guideline development and by the Office (...) Panel (TEP) participants; assure VA relevance; help develop and approve final project scope and timeframe for completion; provide feedback on draft report; and provide consultation on strategies for dissemination of the report to field and relevant groups. Stuart Hoffman, PhD Scientific Program Manager for Brain Injury and Senior Scientific Advisor for Brain Injury Office of Research and Development Ralph DePalma, MD, FACS Special Operations Officer David X. Cifu, MD National Director of Physical

2019 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

104. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI)

should include: ? length of hospital stay ? hospital mortality ? 30 day mortality (adults only) ? 90 day mortality (adults only) Renal Association Clinical Practice Guideline Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) - August 2019 15 ? one year mortality (adults only) ? need for renal replacement therapy ? maximum severity stage of that AKI episode Audit Measure 3a: Adults only: Proportion of patients with AKI who recover kidney function by 30 days after an episode of entirely community-managed AKI or by the time (...) such as haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), drug nephrotoxicity and intrinsic renal disease, all of which require specialist referral and management. Rheault et al [37] highlighted that, in 336 patients admitted with a relapse of nephrotic syndrome, 58.6% had AKI although only 6.3% had severe Renal Association Clinical Practice Guideline Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) - August 2019 58 disease (pRIFLE stage (F)). They identified steroid resistance, concomitant infection and use of nephrotoxic drugs as risk factors

2019 Renal Association

105. Traumatic Brain Injury and Dementia

on the Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain (mTBI) (2016) 14 and the Brain Trauma Foundation’s 4 th Edition of Guidelines for Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (2016). 15 Furthermore, increased public awareness and concern about reports of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) in active-duty service members has heightened the urgency to better understand the potential chronic neurodegenerative risks of TBI. 16,17 CTE is a neurodegenerative condition first recognized in contact sports (...) Consortium. Goals and Mission. https://cenc.rti.org/Goals-and-Mission. Accessed December 12, 2018. 14. The Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury Working Group. VA/DoD CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF CONCUSSION-MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. Department of Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense; 2016. Evidence Brief: TBI and Dementia Evidence Synthesis Program 22 15. Carney MN, Totten SA, O'reilly WJC, et al. Guidelines for the management of severe traumatic brain injury

2019 Veterans Affairs Evidence-based Synthesis Program Reports

106. A review of pressure injury rates in Australian hospitals

) published a safety and quality improvement guide for Standard 8 – the prevention and management of pressure injuries [1] . As a result, robust audit and data collection systems should be developed to evaluate the effectiveness of current strategies and identify areas where improvements can be made. Consequently, health service organisations should ensure that mechanisms are in place to collect data on incidence, prevalence and severity of pressure injuries [2] . To ensure the highest quality of care (...) a safety and quality improvement guide for Standard 8 – the prevention and management of pressure injuries [1] . As a result, robust audit and data collection systems should be developed to evaluate the effectiveness of current strategies and identify areas where improvements can be made. Consequently, health service organisations should ensure that mechanisms are in place to collect data on incidence, prevalence and severity of pressure injuries [2] . To ensure the highest quality of care for our

2019 Monash Health Evidence Reviews

107. Head injury

; localizing touch, score 5; spontaneous purposeful movement or obeys simple commands, score 6. Severity of head injury Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score Mild 13–15 Moderate 9–12 Severe 8 or less [ ] Basis for recommendation Basis for recommendation The recommendations on how to assess a person with a head injury are based on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) clinical guidelines Head injury: assessment and early management [ ] and Child maltreatment: when to suspect maltreatment (...) assessment and management of possible of a head injury to neurology or neuroendocrinology, neuropsychology or psychiatry, neurosurgery, or a specialist in rehabilitation medicine, depending on clinical judgement, if: There are persistent non-specific symptoms for more than three months suggesting possible . Another or cause of head injury is suspected, for example, if there are new-onset focal neurological signs. There are concerns or uncertainty about the nature or severity of symptoms. Basis

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

108. Overview of sport-related injuries

either a direct blow to the head or the transmission of an impulsive force to the head. Symptoms can be divided into 3 groups: cognitive, somatic, and affective. A combination of somatic and cognitive symptoms is most common. Collection of blood between the dural and arachnoid coverings of the brain. May be acute or chronic, and the primary cause is trauma. It is the most common life-threatening injury encountered by boxers. Miele VJ, Bailes JE, Cantu RC, et al. Subdural hematomas in boxing (...) haemodynamic effects. Patients typically present with new, not previously experienced, headache of variable character. Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is bleeding into the subarachnoid space. This may be due to trauma or rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (which may be triggered by stress and physical exertion). Sudden severe headache, photophobia, and loss of consciousness are characteristic. Sports are a frequent cause of these traumatic injuries. Blunt trauma to the globe of the eye (e.g., impact

2018 BMJ Best Practice

109. Assessment of traumatic brain injury, acute

of severity and prognosis. Carney N, Totten AM, O'Reilly C, et al. Guidelines for the management of severe traumatic brain injury, fourth edition. Neurosurgery. 2017 Jan 1;80(1):6-15. https://braintrauma.org/uploads/03/12/Guidelines_for_Management_of_Severe_TBI_4th_Edition.pdf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27654000?tool=bestpractice.com Stiell IG, Wells GA, Vandemheen K, et al. The Canadian CT head rule for patients with minor head injury. Lancet. 2001;357(9266):1391-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (...) . The Canadian CT head rule for patients with minor head injury. Lancet. 2001;357(9266):1391-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11356436?tool=bestpractice.com Bullock MR, Chesnut R, Ghajar J, et al; Surgical Management of Traumatic Brain Injury Author Group. Surgical management of acute subdural hematomas. Neurosurgery. 2006 Mar;58(3 Suppl):S16-24. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16710968?tool=bestpractice.com Epidural haematomas (EDH) are seen in about 10% of patients with moderate to severe TBI

2018 BMJ Best Practice

110. Assessment of traumatic brain injury, acute

of severity and prognosis. Carney N, Totten AM, O'Reilly C, et al. Guidelines for the management of severe traumatic brain injury, fourth edition. Neurosurgery. 2017 Jan 1;80(1):6-15. https://braintrauma.org/uploads/03/12/Guidelines_for_Management_of_Severe_TBI_4th_Edition.pdf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27654000?tool=bestpractice.com Stiell IG, Wells GA, Vandemheen K, et al. The Canadian CT head rule for patients with minor head injury. Lancet. 2001;357(9266):1391-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (...) . The Canadian CT head rule for patients with minor head injury. Lancet. 2001;357(9266):1391-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11356436?tool=bestpractice.com Bullock MR, Chesnut R, Ghajar J, et al; Surgical Management of Traumatic Brain Injury Author Group. Surgical management of acute subdural hematomas. Neurosurgery. 2006 Mar;58(3 Suppl):S16-24. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16710968?tool=bestpractice.com Epidural haematomas (EDH) are seen in about 10% of patients with moderate to severe TBI

2018 BMJ Best Practice

111. Changing attitudes to the management of severe head injuries. (Full text)

Changing attitudes to the management of severe head injuries. 990863 1977 01 29 2018 11 13 0007-1447 2 6046 1976 Nov 20 British medical journal Br Med J Changing attitudes to the management of severe head injuries. 1234-9 Lewin W W eng Journal Article England Br Med J 0372673 0007-1447 8W8T17847W Urea AIM IM Attitude of Health Personnel Brain Concussion pathology Brain Edema etiology Brain Injuries drug therapy Craniocerebral Trauma complications therapy Hematoma complications Humans

1976 British medical journal

112. Early management of the severe head injury. (Full text)

Early management of the severe head injury. 4821614 1974 06 10 2018 11 13 0035-9157 67 1 1974 Jan Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine Proc. R. Soc. Med. Early management of the severe head injury. 8-9 Gordon D S DS Crockard H A HA eng Journal Article England Proc R Soc Med 7505890 0035-9157 IM Adult Airway Obstruction therapy Blood Transfusion Cerebral Hemorrhage therapy Coma complications Cough complications Craniocerebral Trauma therapy Cyanosis complications Hemostasis Humans

1974 Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine

113. Managing behavioural and mental health outcomes following a traumatic brain injury

and symptoms of a TBI, specifically a SRC, often dissipate to the point of clinical recovery within several weeks after injury, the long-term behavioural effects of childhood head trauma are misunderstood. 1,4,5 These effects may not present themselves until later in life, perhaps effecting the quality of life well into adulthood. 1,2,4,5 As healthcare providers in sports medicine, we must continue to evolve our practice regarding mental and behavioural health by exploring all aspects of the patient (...) Managing behavioural and mental health outcomes following a traumatic brain injury Managing behavioural and mental health outcomes following a traumatic brain injury | BJSM blog - social media's leading SEM voice by By Sadie R. Morway, Zachary K. Winkelmann , Kenneth E. Games It is crucial to examine the long-term effects following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in sports medicine. This is especially important for children given the sensitive development of the brain during childhood

2018 British Journal of Sports Medicine Blog

114. Optimal Perioperative Care in Major Head and Neck Cancer Surgery With Free Flap Reconstruction A Consensus Review and Recommendations From the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Society

.2016.2981 Samir S. Khariwala, MD, MS, FACS Key Points Question What is optimal perioperative care, as defined by an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) approach, for patients undergoing head and neck cancer surgery with free flap reconstruction? Findings In this systematic review, best practice includes several elements of perioperative care. Among these elements are the provision of preoperative carbohydrate treatment, pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, perioperative antibiotics in clean-contaminated (...) procedures, corticosteroid and antiemetic medications, short acting anxiolytics, goal-directed fluid management, opioid-sparing multimodal analgesia, frequent flap monitoring, early mobilization, and the avoidance of preoperative fasting. Meaning Recovery following surgery for head and neck cancer with free flap reconstruction can be enhanced through the use of evidence-based elements of perioperative care. Abstract Importance Head and neck cancers often require complex, labor-intensive surgeries

2017 ERAS Society

115. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care

recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline (...) due to cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx in the United States was 61,760 and 13,190, respectively. Single-modality therapy is used for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), whereas multimodality therapy is used for locoregionally advanced disease, with the goals of care being improved organ preservation and cancer mortality. Surgery, radiation therapy, and systemic chemotherapy can result in short-term and long-term adverse effects, which need to be managed among those who survive

2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

116. Splenic Injury, Blunt, Selective Nonoperative Management of

in adults with injuries to the liver continue to support nonoperative management in hemodynamically stable adults, but questions still exist about efficacy, patient selection, and details of management. [4–8] These questions include the following: Are the 2003 recommendations still valid? Is nonoperative management appropriate for all hemodynamically stable adults regardless of severity of solid-organ injury or presence of associated injuries? What role should angiography and other adjunctive therapies (...) after blunt abdominal trauma should be taken urgently for laparotomy. Level 2 A routine laparotomy is not indicated in the hemodynamically stable patient without peritonitis presenting with an isolated splenic injury. The severity of splenic injury (as suggested by CT grade or degree of hemoperitoneum), neurologic status, age >55 and/or the presence of associated injuries are not contraindications to a trial of nonoperative management in a hemodynamically stable patient. In the hemodynamically

2012 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

117. Hepatic Injury, Blunt, Selective Nonoperative Management of

with blunt hepatic trauma at most of the US trauma centers, with reported success rates ranging from 82% to 100%. [8][10–14] Some have even voiced that operative management of hepatic trauma leads to increased hepatic hemorrhage and may lead to unnecessary interventions with an increased incidence of iatrogenic complications. [2][3] Factors previously thought to completely preclude nonoperative management of hepatic injuries include hepatic injury grade, head injury, injury severity score, degree (...) , patient selection, and details of management. [2][6–9] These questions include as follows: Are the 2003 recommendations still valid? Is nonoperative management appropriate for all hemodynamically stable adults regardless of the severity of solid-organ injury or presence of associated injuries? What role should angiography and other adjunctive therapies play in nonoperative management? Is the risk of missing a hollow viscous injury a deterrent to nonoperative management? What is the best way

2012 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

118. Should stimulants be administered to manage difficulties with attention, hyperactivity and impulsivity following paediatric acquired brain injury?

of traumatic brain injury. Brain Inj 1988;2:273–90. Clark E, Baker BK, Gardner MK, et al. Effectiveness of stimulant drug treatment for attention problems – a look at head injured children. Sch Psychol Int 1990;11:227–34. Plenger PM, Dixon CE, Castillo RM, et al. Subacute methylphenidate treatment for moderate to moderately severe traumatic brain injury: a preliminary double-blind placebo-controlled study. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1996;77:536–40 Mahalick DM, Carmel PW, Greenberg JP, et al. Psychopharmacologic (...) Should stimulants be administered to manage difficulties with attention, hyperactivity and impulsivity following paediatric acquired brain injury? BestBets: Should stimulants be administered to manage difficulties with attention, hyperactivity and impulsivity following paediatric acquired brain injury? Should stimulants be administered to manage difficulties with attention, hyperactivity and impulsivity following paediatric acquired brain injury? Report By: David W Harvey, Matthew Morrall

2012 BestBETS

119. Traumatic brain injury

intracranial pressure (ICP)] are [hypertonic sodium solutions better than mannitol] at [reducing morbidity and mortality]? Clinical Scenario A 54 year old female pedestrian has been hit by a bus. She is brought into the ED by ambulance. Her GCS is 13 on arrival and examination reveals an isolated head injury with a haematoma over the left occiput. CT confirms a right 2011 13. Elevation of the head during intensive care management in people with severe traumatic brain injury . BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain (...) of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com Top results for traumatic brain injury 1. Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (4th edition) Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury , Fourth Edition | Neurosurgery | Oxford Academic We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

120. Purely Ligamentous Flexion-Distraction Injury in a Five-Year-Old Child Treated with Surgical Management (Full text)

involved in a head-on collision who suffered a purely ligamentous flexion-distraction injury (Chance-type injury, without bone involvement) at the L2-L3 vertebral level. Previously these injuries were managed conservatively with serial casting; however, we present a case in which surgical management was used. A five-year-old girl sustained multiple injuries after being involved in a high-speed motor vehicle accident. At presentation, there was obvious abdominal bruising with a seat-belt sign and marked (...) and internal fixation with an L2-L3 laminectomy, pedicle screw and rod placement. The kyphotic deformity was reduced using a compression device and stable alignment was achieved intraoperatively. This was a rare and difficult case with limited evidence on the appropriate management of such an injury. Due to the severe instability of her injury, a surgical approach was taken. At two years postoperative, the patient is neurologically intact and pain free. Imaging revealed stable alignment of her lumbar

2017 Cureus

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