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Management of Severe Head Injury

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41. The study protocol for the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The study protocol for the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics. The utility of advanced prehospital interventions for severe blunt traumatic brain injury (BTI) remains controversial. Of all trauma patient subgroups it has been anticipated that this patient group would most benefit from advanced prehospital interventions as hypoxia and hypotension (...) have been demonstrated to be associated with poor outcomes and these factors may be amenable to prehospital intervention. Supporting evidence is largely lacking however. In particular the efficacy of early anaesthesia/muscle relaxant assisted intubation has proved difficult to substantiate.This article describes the design and protocol of the Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT) which is a randomised controlled single centre trial of physician prehospital care (delivering advanced interventions

2013 Scandinavian journal of trauma, resuscitation and emergency medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

42. Novel coronavirus (COVID-19) Guidance for Primary Care Management of patients presenting to primary care

Novel coronavirus (COVID-19) Guidance for Primary Care Management of patients presenting to primary care Health Protection Scotland This document is uncontrolled when printed. Before use check the HPS COVID-19 page to verify this is the current version Novel coronavirus (COVID-19) Guidance for Primary Care Management of patients presenting to primary care Version 10.4 Publication date 27 March 2020 Health Protection Scotland 1 Version History Version Date Summary of changes V1.0 23/01/20 First (...) Algorithm amended to clarify that travel includes transit through a risk area Addition of: - section on test results - section on further information Waste guidance amended to reflect management as Category B Appendix 3: Removed reference to double glove. Version history has been moved to page 1. V8.1 24/02/2020 Reference to coronavirus (2019n-CoV) changed to COVID-19 V8.2 26/02/2020 Included links to PPE instructional videos V8.3. 28/02/2020 Phone numbers corrected in appendix 2 V8.4 05/03/2020 Phone

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc guidelines

43. Sir Hugh Cairns and World War II British advances in head injury management, diffuse brain injury, and concussion: an Oxford tale. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sir Hugh Cairns and World War II British advances in head injury management, diffuse brain injury, and concussion: an Oxford tale. The authors trace the Oxford, England, roots of World War II (WWII)-related advances in head injury management, the biomechanics of concussion and brain injury, and postwar delineation of pathological findings in severe concussion and diffuse brain injury in man. The prominent figure in these developments was the charismatic and innovative Harvey Cushing-trained (...) Hospital for Head Injuries. During this time Cairns also trained the first full-time female neurosurgeon. Pivotal in supporting animal research demonstrating the critical role of acceleration in the causation of concussion, Cairns recruited the physicist Hylas Holbourn, whose research implicated rotary acceleration and shear strains as particularly damaging. Cairns' work in military medicine and head injury remain highly influential in efforts to mitigate and manage brain injury.

2016 Journal of Neurosurgery

44. Prostate cancer: diagnosis and management

Prostate cancer: diagnosis and management Prostate cancer: diagnosis and Prostate cancer: diagnosis and management management NICE guideline Published: 9 May 2019 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng131 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When (...) insignificant prostate cancer if they have a prostate biopsy. The most common type of biopsy, transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS), has some rare but important complications. The most serious is sepsis, which develops in a bit less than 1 out of 100 people. Other serious complications, including acute urinary retention, severe haematuria and severe rectal bleeding may need hospitalisation. Prostate cancer: diagnosis and management (NG131) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

45. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management

the possible risks of not offering CT brain imaging to everyone with a suspected TIA. They agreed that, in the absence of clinical 'red flag' indicators (for example, headache, anticoagulation, head injury, repetitive stereotyped events), it is rare for a CT scan to reveal an alternative diagnosis needing a different referral pathway. Therefore, the number of referrals to TIA clinics should not increase greatly. Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management (NG128) © (...) Stroke and transient ischaemic attack in over 16s: diagnosis and initial management Strok Stroke and tr e and transient ischaemic attack in ansient ischaemic attack in o ov ver 16s: diagnosis and initial er 16s: diagnosis and initial management management NICE guideline Published: 1 May 2019 www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng128 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

46. Management of the paediatric patient with acute head trauma

Management of the paediatric patient with acute head trauma Head trauma leading to brain injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Injury severity is related to the mechanism of trauma, which itself varies with age. The vast majority of head trauma in paediatric patients is mild, requires no specific therapy and leaves no sequelae. However, it is important to identify individuals at risk of significant injury, and thus in need of specific evaluation. The purpose (...) of this statement is to describe issues related to head trauma in infants, children and youth, including clinical manifestations, initial management priorities, guidelines for imaging, and subsequent observation and treatment. It addresses the evaluation of patients with acute trauma to the head at the time of initial assessment; it does not describe the subsequent management of such patients in the paediatric intensive care unit. Key Words : CT scan; Head trauma; Skull x-rays; Prevention; Traumatic brain

2013 Canadian Paediatric Society

47. Management of Oral and Gastrointestinal Mucosal Injury

completed at the inter- national,inter-professionallevel: ? A comprehensive update of oral and gastrointestinal tract mucositis guidelines previously produced by the Mucositis Study Group of MASCC in 2007 [2]. The most recent updated evidence-based guidelines, published in 2014 [3], represent the state-of-the-science for mucositis management in patients receiving conventional chemotherapy and/or head andneckradiation. ? Expert opinion on the management of mucosal injury caused by targeted cancer (...) . Some of these infections can be severe, leading to sepsis, respira- toryand/orhepaticfailure,andfatality[37,38]. It thus seems clinically prudent to optimise oral mucosal hygiene by utilising saline-based oral rinses. As is the case with other types of oral mucosal injury caused by cancer therapy, patient education relative to types and management of oral mucosalinjurycausedbymTORinhibitorsisofprimeimportance toreducingsevereoralulcerations,maximisingpatientcompliance, andclinicaloutcomes

2015 European Society for Medical Oncology

48. Outcomes after Traumatic Brain Injury with Concomitant Severe Extracranial Injuries Full Text available with Trip Pro

Outcomes after Traumatic Brain Injury with Concomitant Severe Extracranial Injuries Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in trauma patients. Patients with TBI frequently sustain concomitant injuries in extracranial regions. The effect of severe extracranial injury (SEI) on the outcome of TBI is controversial. For 8 years, we retrospectively enrolled 485 patients with the blunt head injury with head abbreviated injury scale (AIS) ≧ 3. SEI was defined as AIS ≧ 3 (...) injuries in the face, chest, abdomen, and pelvis/extremities. Vital signs and coagulation parameter values were also extracted from the database. Total patients were dichotomized into isolated TBI (n = 343) and TBI associated with SEI (n = 142). The differences in severity and outcome between these two groups were analyzed. To assess the relation between outcome and any variables showing significant differences in univariate analysis, we included the parameters in univariable and multivariable logistic

2018 Neurologia medico-chirurgica

49. Early Management of Retained Hemothorax in Blunt Head and Chest Trauma. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Early Management of Retained Hemothorax in Blunt Head and Chest Trauma. Major blunt chest injury usually leads to the development of retained hemothorax and pneumothorax, and needs further intervention. However, since blunt chest injury may be combined with blunt head injury that typically requires patient observation for 3-4 days, other critical surgical interventions may be delayed. The purpose of this study is to analyze the outcomes of head injury patients who received early, versus delayed (...) thoracic surgeries.From May 2005 to February 2012, 61 patients with major blunt injuries to the chest and head were prospectively enrolled. These patients had an intracranial hemorrhage without indications of craniotomy. All the patients received video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) due to retained hemothorax or pneumothorax. Patients were divided into two groups according to the time from trauma to operation, this being within 4 days for Group 1 and more than 4 days for Group 2. The clinical

2018 World Journal of Surgery

50. Covid-19: Management of emergency department patients

, open suctioning, tracheostomy, high speed drilling and bronchoscopy. Please see guidance from PHE and consult with your local infectious diseases team if in any doubt, and note that guidance on this may change. 3 | Clinical guide for the management of emergency department patients during the coronavirus pandemic – severity assessment of the illness – establishing a differential diagnosis based on history, examination, haematological, biochemical and CXR findings – judicious use of CT where (...) to the latest advice available (which may change from the information contained in this document). Guidance from NHSI/E and PHE is being frequently updated as the national caseload and required response is evolving. Your Trust will have an Incident Management Team in place and you will have plans on what activity continues in light of pressure on services and staffing. Please consult with your local management team. We must engage with those planning our local response. We may also need to work outside

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc guidelines

51. Management of essential cancer surgery for adults during the coronavirus pandemic

Management of essential cancer surgery for adults during the coronavirus pandemic A NHS England clinical guide for the management of essential cancer surgery for adults during the coronavirus pandemic: applicable to NHSScotland? HIS Evidence were asked whether the recommendations in the following guidance are evidence based, practical and not in conflict with other advice? Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and NHS England (7 April 2020) Clinical guide for the management of essential cancer (...) that they were based on clinical expert opinion. In the background, the authors state that the guidance ‘builds on the experience of China, Italy and London…on the prioritisation and management of essential cancer surgery’. Contact was made with the authors of the guidance, who provided more information around how China and Italy organised their services. Guidance from other countries on the prioritisation of cancer surgeries often state that they are based on clinical expert opinion – suggesting

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc papers

52. Management of Vertebral Artery Injuries Following Non-Penetrating Cervical Trauma Full Text available with Trip Pro

Management of Vertebral Artery Injuries Following Non-Penetrating Cervical Trauma We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Management of Vertebral Artery Injuries Following Non-Penetrating Cervical Trauma | Neurosurgery | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article (...) Navigation Close mobile search navigation Article navigation March 2013 Article Contents Article Navigation Management of Vertebral Artery Injuries Following Non-Penetrating Cervical Trauma Mark R. Harrigan, MD *Division of Neurological Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama Search for other works by this author on: Mark N. Hadley, MD *Division of Neurological Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama † Correspondence: Mark N. Hadley, MD, FACS, UAB

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

53. Management of Pediatric Cervical Spine and Spinal Cord Injuries Full Text available with Trip Pro

maturation and his/her specific injury. The purpose of this review is to address the unique aspects of children with real or potential cervical spinal injuries, and provide recommendations regarding their management. SEARCH CRITERIA Incorporating and expanding upon the first iteration of these guidelines, a National Library of Medicine (PubMed) computerized literature search from 1966 to 2011 was undertaken using Medical Subject Headings in combination with “spinal cord injuries” and “child” and yielded (...) and performed. Several authors have evaluated the indications for radiographic assessment of children with a potential cervical spinal injury. , Laham et al investigated the role of cervical spine x-ray evaluation of 268 children with apparent isolated head injuries. They retrospectively divided the children into high (n = 133) and low-risk (n = 135) groups. High-risk characteristics were children incapable of verbal communication either because of age (< 2 years of age) or head injury, and those children

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

54. The Diagnosis and Management of Traumatic Atlanto-occipital Dislocation Injuries Full Text available with Trip Pro

AOD. KEY ISSUES FOR FUTURE INVESTIGATION Although the use of external immobilization for AOD was often associated with late instability, several patients achieved stability without operative management. The complimentary usage of CT imaging (with 3-dimensional reconstruction images for more precise measurement of the magnitude of displacement) and MRI (for differentiation of partial and complete ligament tears from stretch injuries) may be useful in identifying a subgroup of patients in whom (...) The Diagnosis and Management of Traumatic Atlanto-occipital Dislocation Injuries We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Diagnosis and Management of Traumatic Atlanto-occipital Dislocation Injuries | Neurosurgery | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

55. The Acute Cardiopulmonary Management of Patients With Cervical Spinal Cord Injuries Full Text available with Trip Pro

acute spinal cord injuries (SCIs). – Several reports describe improved patient management and lower morbidity and mortality following acute SCI with ICU monitoring and aggressive medical management. – , – Despite this interest in and commitment to more comprehensive care for the patient with an acute SCI, many traumatic SCI patients are not managed in an ICU setting, nor are they routinely monitored for cardiac or respiratory dysfunction. There exist divergent management strategies for acute SCI (...) itself, or a combination of the two. The presence of hypotension has been shown to be associated with worse outcomes after traumatic injury, including severe head injury. , , – Although a prospective controlled assessment of the effects of hypotension on acute human SCI has not been performed, laboratory evidence suggests that hypotension contributes to secondary injury after acute SCI by further reducing spinal cord blood flow and perfusion. , , , , – Hypotension in animal models of SCI results

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

56. Methodology of the Guidelines for the Management of Acute Cervical Spine and Spinal Cord Injuries Full Text available with Trip Pro

; 49 : 407 – 498 . 2. Rosenberg J , Greenberg MK Practice parameters: strategies for survival into the nineties . Neurology . 1992 ; 42 ( 5 ): 1110 – 1115 . 3. Field M , Lohr K Clinical Practice Guidelines: Directions for a New Program—Committee to Advise the Public Health Service on Clinical Practice Guidelines: Institute of Medicine . Washington, DC : National Academy Press ; 1990 . 4. Bullock R , Chesnut RM , Clifton G , et al. Guidelines for the management of severe head injury: Brain Trauma (...) of these guidelines, as well as several other neurosurgical guideline documents. – The levels of recommendations as used in the previous iteration of the “Guidelines for the Management of Acute Cervical Spine and Spinal Cord Injuries,” which are derived from the classes of evidence listed above, are related to the certainty that a clinician has that the evidence is strong enough to support the recommendation(s) as follows: Standards: Reflection of a high degree of clinical certainty Guidelines: Reflection

2013 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

57. Evidence-based approaches to the management of cognitive and behavioral impairments following pediatric brain injury

, Juttler E, Unterberg A, Hacke W. Decompressive surgery for severe brain edema. J. Intensive Care Med. 24(3),168–178 ( 2009 ). , 20 Guerguerian A, Milly Lo TY, Hutchison JS. Clinical management and functional neuromonitoring in traumatic brain injury in children. Curr. Opin. Pediatr. 21,1–8 ( 2009 ). , 21 Philip S, Udomphorn Y, Kirkham FJ, Vavilala MS. Cerebrovascular pathopysiology in pediatric traumatic brain injury. J. Trauma Inj. Infect. Crit. Care 67(2),128–134 ( 2009 ). , 22 Beauchamp MH, Babl FE (...) CE, Adelson PD. Neurobehavioral effects of amantadine after pediatric traumatic brain injury. J. Head Trauma. Rehabil. 20(5),450–463 ( 2005 ). , 38 Patrick PD, Buck ML, Conaway MR, Blackman JA. The use of dopamine enhancing medications with children in low response states following brain injury. Brain Inj. 17(6),497–506 ( 2003 ). , , 39 Trovato M, Slomine B, Pidock F, Christensen J. The efficacy of donepezil hydrochloride on memory functioning in three adolescents with severe traumatic brain

2013 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

58. rTMS Treatment of Persistent Headache and Post Concussion Symptoms Attributed to Mild Traumatic Injury to the Head

rTMS Treatment of Persistent Headache and Post Concussion Symptoms Attributed to Mild Traumatic Injury to the Head rTMS Treatment of Persistent Headache and Post Concussion Symptoms Attributed to Mild Traumatic Injury to the Head - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number (...) of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. rTMS Treatment of Persistent Headache and Post Concussion Symptoms Attributed to Mild Traumatic Injury to the Head (TOPiCS-rTMS) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03691272 Recruitment Status : Active

2018 Clinical Trials

59. Platelet Inhibitor Treated Patients With Head Injury Trauma Meeting NICE Criteria : is the CT-scan Mandatory ?

Platelet Inhibitor Treated Patients With Head Injury Trauma Meeting NICE Criteria : is the CT-scan Mandatory ? Platelet Inhibitor Treated Patients With Head Injury Trauma Meeting NICE Criteria : is the CT-scan Mandatory ? - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved (...) several conditions including taking antiplatelet inhibitors. However, the real risk of cerebral haemorrhage for theses cases is controversial in litterature. In parallel, more and more patients undergoing antiplatelet inhibitor's treatment are seen in emergencies after a head injury trauma. In routine protocol at the emergency rooms, these patients are seen for a clinical exam and next submitted to a CT-scanner. If the clinician can't detect a cerebral haemorrage, the patient will return at home

2018 Clinical Trials

60. Is There a Worse Outcome When the Systolic Blood Pressure is Lower Than Heart Rate in Those Adult Trauma Patients With Isolated Head/Neck Injury

Is There a Worse Outcome When the Systolic Blood Pressure is Lower Than Heart Rate in Those Adult Trauma Patients With Isolated Head/Neck Injury Is There a Worse Outcome When the Systolic Blood Pressure is Lower Than Heart Rate in Those Adult Trauma Patients With Isolated Head/Neck Injury - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save (...) to 100 Years (Adult, Older Adult) Sexes Eligible for Study: All Accepts Healthy Volunteers: No Sampling Method: Probability Sample Study Population Adult patients having isolated TBI with a head abbreviated injury scale (AIS) ≥ 3 and without severe injury to other regions (other AIS ≤ 1) were included. We excluded patients younger than 18 or older than 65 years of age. Patients were grouped and analyzed according to RSI (< 1 or ≥ 1). Criteria Inclusion Criteria: Adult patients having isolated TBI

2018 Clinical Trials

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