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Management of Severe Head Injury

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21. The Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single-centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics only. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single-centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics only. Advanced prehospital interventions for severe brain injury remains controversial. No previous randomised trial has been conducted to evaluate additional physician intervention compared with paramedic only care.Participants in this prospective, randomised controlled trial were adult patients with blunt (...) trauma with either a scene GCS score <9 (original definition), or GCS<13 and an Abbreviated Injury Scale score for the head region ≥3 (modified definition). Patients were randomised to either standard ground paramedic treatment or standard treatment plus a physician arriving by helicopter. Patients were evaluated by 30-day mortality and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Due to high non-compliance rates, both intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses were preplanned.375 patients met

2015 Emergency Medicine Journal Controlled trial quality: predicted high

22. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Communication and Swallowing Disorders following Paediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

Children’s Hospital, VictoriaClinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Communication and Swallowing Disorders following Paediatric Traumatic Brain Injury 10 Plain English Summary Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of disability, affecting approximately 765 1 to 2008 2 per 100 000 Australian children each year. Its effects are vast and include speech, language and swallowing disorders. These disorders are more likely to affect children with moderate and severe TBI. This guideline (...) speech, language and swallowing that is specific to the child to support recovery. • Information about factors that predict speech, language and swallowing disorders is limited. Factors that might be considered include extent, severity and site of injury, cranial nerve involvement, cognition, and ventilation period. Executive Summary This guideline provides evidence-based recommendations (EBRs) and consensus-based recommendations (CBRs) for the management of speech, language and swallowing disorders

2017 Clinical Practice Guidelines Portal

23. Guidance for Return to Practice for Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery: Part Two

Guidance for Return to Practice for Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery: Part Two 1 Guidance for Return to Practice for Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Part Two Future of Otolaryngology Task Force: Gavin Setzen, MD (Chair), Samantha Anne, MD, Eugene G. Brown III, MD, James C. Denneny III, MD, Marc G. Dubin, MD, Stacey L. Ishman, MD, MPH, Ronald B. Kuppersmith, MD, MBA, and, Richard V. Smith, MD. INTRODUCTION While this document will address many important concerns, the environment (...) for patients to come in at their convenience, consider using appointments or other mechanisms to manage office occupancy and flow to maximize social distancing. HEAD AND NECK SURGERY The practice of head and neck surgery must evolve to meet the needs of our patients while balancing the challenges we face during the COVID-19 pandemic. Head and neck cancer care has fallen within the urgent group of patients who have continued to get care at many centers. However, clinic visits, surveillance of cancer

2020 American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

24. Physiologic Predictors of Severe Injury: Systematic Review

Physiologic Predictors of Severe Injury: Systematic Review Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 205 Physiologic Predictors of Severe Injury: Systematic Review e Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 205 Physiologic Predictors of Severe Injury: Systematic Review Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane Rockville, MD 20857 www.ahrq.gov Contract No. 290-2015-00009-I Prepared by: Pacific Northwest Evidence-based (...) using assistive technology may not be able to fully access information in this report. For assistance contact epc@ahrq.hhs.gov. Suggested citation: Totten AM, Cheney TP, O'Neil ME, Newgard CD, Daya M, Fu R, Wasson N, Hart EL, Chou R. Physiologic Predictors of Severe Injury: Systematic Review. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 205. (Prepared by the Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2015-00009-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 18-EHC008-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency

2018 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

25. Acute kidney injury: prevention, detection and management

Acute kidney injury: prevention, detection and management Acute kidne Acute kidney injury: pre y injury: prev vention, ention, detection and management detection and management Clinical guideline Published: 28 August 2013 nice.org.uk/guidance/cg169 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived (...) referral to nephrology services for moderate to severe acute kidney injury 26 2.3 Definition of acute kidney injury – system for staging and detection 28 2.4 Introducing renal replacement therapy 28 2.5 Preventing deterioration 29 3 Other information 31 3.1 Scope and how this guideline was developed 31 3.2 Related NICE guidance 31 4 The Guideline Development Group, National Collaborating Centre and NICE project team 33 4.1 Guideline Development Group 33 4.2 National Clinical Guideline Centre 34 4.3

2013 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

26. Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking

, neck or torso; ? traumatic, thoracic or abdominal visceral lesions (liver, pancreas, digestive tract, etc.). When the diagnosis is made or highly suspected, the child must be considered to have a severe head injury, be at especially high risk of convulsions, and must be hospitalised in a paediatric intensive care unit, with neurosurgical opinion. In case of a constant medical history, compatible with the lesions and with the child’s age, and describing an accidental violent head injury (...) Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking Shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental head injury caused by shaking Update of the guidelines issued by the 2011 hearing commission GUIDELINES TEXT July 2017 CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE The good practice guidelines (GPG) are defined in the health field as methodically developed proposals to assist the practitioner and the patient to find the most appropriate care in given clinical circumstances. The GPGs are rigorous summaries

2017 HAS Guidelines

27. Management of Suspected Spinal Injury

cord injury are: • a motor vehicle, motor cycle or bicycle incident as an occupant, rider, or pedestrian • an industrial accident (i.e. workplace) • a dive or jump into shallow water or water with obstacles or being "dumped" in the surf • a sporting accident (e.g. rugby, falling from a horse) • a fall from greater than a standing height (e.g. ladder, roof) • falls in the elderly population • a significant blow to the head • a severe penetrating wound (e.g. gunshot). The symptoms and signs (...) the limbs (paralysis) • nausea • headache or dizziness • altered or absent skin sensation. 2.2 Signs Signs of spinal injury include: • head or neck in an abnormal position • signs of an associated head injury • altered conscious state • breathing difficulties • shock • change in muscle tone, either flaccid or stiff • loss of function in limbs • loss of bladder or bowel control • priapism (erection in males). ANZCOR Guideline 9.1.6 January 2016 Page 3 of 6 3 Management The priorities of management

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

28. Relationship between injury severity, random blood glucose and management outcome in a cohort of Nigerian patients with head injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

Relationship between injury severity, random blood glucose and management outcome in a cohort of Nigerian patients with head injury This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between injury severity, admission Random Blood Glucose [RBG] and management outcome in a cohort of Nigerian patients with Head Injury [HI].RBG was determined at admission, twenty four hours as well as seventy two hours after admission in patients with head injury. Severity of injury was graded using Glasgow Coma (...) in 25% of the patients, moderate disability occurred in 30.1% and good outcome occurred in 35.8%. Hyperglycaemia occurred in one patient each in mild and severe head injuries and in two patients with moderate head injury. All the patients with hyperglycaemia had favourable outcome.Random blood glucose of ≥ 11.1 mmol/l was not common at admission in head injured patients in this cohort of patients and the value was not associated with severe injury or poor outcome.

2015 Journal of neurosciences in rural practice

29. Mild Head Injury Home Management

Severe Weakness or loss of feeling in arm or leg Confusion or strange behavior Eye changes One pupil larger than the other ( ) Peculiar eye movements ( , saccades) Slow pulse (<50/minute) or rapid pulse (>110/minute) Unusual breathing pattern or bowel IV. References Bengtzen, Novak and Chesnutt (2016) Crit Dec Emerg Med 30(5): 3-10 Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Mild Head Injury Home Management." Click (...) Mild Head Injury Home Management Mild Head Injury Home Management Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Mild Head Injury

2018 FP Notebook

30. Management of Mild Head Injury

Management of Mild Head Injury Management of Mild Head Injury Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Management of Mild Head (...) Injury Management of Mild Head Injury Aka: Management of Mild Head Injury , Mild Traumatic Brain Injury , MTBI , Minor Head Injury , Mild Head Injury , Mild Head Trauma From Related Chapters II. Epidemiology Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) accounts for 75% of the 1.7 Million people in U.S. who suffer TBI annually III. Criteria : 13-15 (at two hours) Loss of consciousness may have occurred with injury Awake and oriented with normal ination IV. History See Time and mechanism of injury Loss

2018 FP Notebook

31. Anti-secretory Factor as a Treatment for Adults With Severe Traumatic Head Injury

Anti-secretory Factor as a Treatment for Adults With Severe Traumatic Head Injury Anti-secretory Factor as a Treatment for Adults With Severe Traumatic Head Injury - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding (...) more. Anti-secretory Factor as a Treatment for Adults With Severe Traumatic Head Injury (SATSWEDEN) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03453749 Recruitment Status : Withdrawn (New study in planning) First Posted : March 5, 2018 Last Update Posted : December 12, 2018 Sponsor: Peter

2017 Clinical Trials

32. Retrospective Analysis of a Population of Patients With With Severe Traumatic Head Injury and Woken Early

Retrospective Analysis of a Population of Patients With With Severe Traumatic Head Injury and Woken Early Retrospective Analysis of a Population of Patients With With Severe Traumatic Head Injury and Woken Early - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100 (...) ). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Retrospective Analysis of a Population of Patients With With Severe Traumatic Head Injury and Woken Early (PRECOCE TC) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03293420 Recruitment Status : Completed First Posted : September 26, 2017 Last

2017 Clinical Trials

33. Head Injury

. A victim may sustain a significant head injury without loss of consciousness or loss of memory (amnesia). Therefore, loss of consciousness or memory loss should not be used to define the severity of a head injury or to guide management. 1 The initial first aid for a victim with head injury includes assessing and managing the airway and breathing, whilst caring for the neck until expert help arrives. There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use by first aiders of simplified concussion (...) if the victim has a reported or witnessed injury, has signs of injury to the head or face such as bruises or bleeding, or is found in a confused or unconscious state. A victim may have a brain injury without external signs of injury to the head or face. Serious problems may not be obvious for several hours after the initial injury. 3 Management • Call an ambulance if there has been a loss of consciousness or altered consciousness at any time, no matter how brief. • A victim who has sustained a head injury

2016 Australian Resuscitation Council

34. Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

, the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) estimates that over 1.7 million people sustain a TBI every year in the United States.[4] Of these injuries, approximately 84% are classified as mTBI. To determine the TBI severity, clinicians should use the criteria displayed in Table 1 below. VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury February 2016 Page 7 of 133 Table 1. Classification of TBI Severity [3] (If a patient meets criteria in more than one (...) to the original CPG. It provides best practice recommendations for the care of patients with a history of mTBI. While screening for and addressing co-occurring mental disorders is considered good clinical practice, specific guidance on management of co-occurring mental health conditions is beyond the scope of this VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Concussion-mild Traumatic Brain Injury February 2016 Page 13 of 133 CPG. Interested readers are referred to related VA/DoD CPGs (e.g

2016 VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines

35. Assessment and Management of Pressure Injuries for the Interprofessional Team, Third Edition

Assessment and Management of Pressure Injuries for the Interprofessional Team, Third Edition Clinical Best Practice Guidelines MAY 2016 Assessment and Management of Pressure Injuries for the Interprofessional T eam Third EditionDisclaimer Th ese guidelines are not binding on nurses, other health care professionals, or the organizations that employ them. Th e use of these guidelines should be fl exible, and based on individual needs and local circumstances. Th ey neither constitute a liability (...) (2016). Assessment and Management of Pressure Injuries for the Interprofessional Team, Th ird Edition. Toronto, ON: Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario. Th is work is funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. All work produced by RNAO is editorially independent from its funding source. Contact Information Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario 158 Pearl Street, Toronto, Ontario M5H 1L3 Website: www.rnao.ca/bpgAssessment and Management of Pressure Injuries

2016 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

36. Communication quality between the medical team and the head coach/manager is associated with injury burden and player availability in elite football clubs. Full Text available with Trip Pro

at four postseason meetings to provide their perceptions of internal communications in their teams. They also recorded data on individual players' exposure to football and time-loss injuries.The injury burden and incidence of severe injuries were significantly higher in teams with low quality of communication between the head coach/manager and the medical team (scores of 1-2 on a 5-point Likert scale) compared with teams with moderate or high-quality scores (scores of 3-5; p=0.008 for both). Teams (...) Communication quality between the medical team and the head coach/manager is associated with injury burden and player availability in elite football clubs. We investigated medical staff interpretations and descriptions of internal communication quality in elite football teams to determine whether internal communication was correlated with injuries and/or player availability at training and matches.Medical staff from 36 elite football clubs across 17 European countries produced 77 reports

2018 British Journal of Sports Medicine

37. Management of Traumatic Brain Injury

, et al. Further experience in the management of severe head injury. J Neurosurg 1981; 54:289-299. Alali, A.S., Fowler, R.A., Mainprize, T.G., et al. Intracranial pressure monitoring in severe traumatic brain injury: results from the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program. J Neurotrauma 30, 1737- 1746, 2013. Chesnut RM, Temkin N, Carney N et al. A trial of intracranial pressure monitoring in traumatic brain injury. N Engl J Med 367:2471-81, 2012. Chesnut RM. Intracranial (...) van den Brink, W. A., H. van Santbrink, E. W. Steyerberg, C. J. Avezaat, J. A. Suazo, C. Hogesteeger, W. J. Jansen, L. M. Kloos, J. Vermeulen and A. I. Maas. Brain oxygen tension in severe head injury. Neurosurgery 46(4): 868- 876; discussion 876-868. 2000 Surgical Management Bullock RM, Chesnut R, Ghajar JBG, Gordon D, Hartl R,Newell DW, Servadei, F, Walters, BC, Wilberger JE. Guidelines for the Surgical Management of Traumatic Brain Injury. Neurosurgery, Supplement, Volume 58, Number 3. 2006

2015 American College of Surgeons

38. Early head up mobilisation for patients with severe acquired brain injury

Early head up mobilisation for patients with severe acquired brain injury Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites. Email salutation (e.g. "Dr Smith" or "Joanne") for correspondence: Organisation web address: Timing and effect (...) models Example: Heterogeneity will be assessed using the (residual) I2 and adjusted R2 statistics. ">Heterogeneity For further guidance please refer to the and to pre-clinical meta-analysis. Example: Whenever a control group serves more than one experimental group, we will correct the total number of control animals in the meta-analysis by dividing the number of animals in the control group by the number of treatment groups served. Where applicable, Holm-Bonferroni correction for testing multiple

2018 PROSPERO

39. CRACKCast E041 – Head Injury

CRACKCast E041 – Head Injury CRACKCast E041 - Head Injury - CanadiEM CRACKCast E041 – Head Injury In , by Chris Lipp September 19, 2016 This episode of CRACKCast covers Rosen’s Chapter 041, Head Injury. This episode covers a spectrum of head injuries seen in the emergency department along with appropriate management. Shownotes – Rosen’s in Perspective Most common causes of head injury: falls, MVC’s Leading cause of death for people < 25 yrs old There may be no external indicators on someone (...) and Cerebral Edema Congestive brain swelling Increased intracranial blood volume due to hyperemia caused by vasodilation needed to maintain increased metabolic needs of damaged brain tissue after head injury Cerebral edema Absolute increase in cerebral water content Diffuse cerebral edema may occur with a head injury, but does NOT correlate with the severity of head injury 3 findings: loss of sulci, loss of grey-white interface and collapsed ventricles Vasogenic edema Failure of the BBB endothelial

2016 CandiEM

40. Percutaneous osteoplasty for the management of a humeral head metastasis: Two case reports. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Percutaneous osteoplasty for the management of a humeral head metastasis: Two case reports. Percutaneous osteoplasty (POP) has been proved effective to relieve pain in metastases of vertebral, pelvis, and femur. Nevertheless, there are few reports about the effectiveness of POP in the humeral head metastases. In this study, we described 2 patients with humeral head metastases treated with POP in our hospital.Case 1 was a 79-year-old man with vertebral and right humeral head metastasis after (...) radical surgery or and periods of chemotherapy for bladder cancer. He suffered constant severe back and right shoulder joint pain even if taking much non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Case 2 was a 59-year-old woman with vertebral and right humeral head metastasis from lung cancer. She received regular radiotherapy and took much painkillers to relieve pain. However, the pain could not be relieved any more after 1 month and severely affects sleeping and daily activities.Both 2 patients were

2019 Medicine

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