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Management of Severe Head Injury

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1. Elevation of the head during intensive care management in people with severe traumatic brain injury. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Elevation of the head during intensive care management in people with severe traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem and a fundamental cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The burden of TBI disproportionately affects low- and middle-income countries. Intracranial hypertension is the most frequent cause of death and disability in brain-injured people. Special interventions in the intensive care unit are required to minimise factors (...) intensive care management in people with severe TBI.We searched the following electronic databases from their inception up to March 2017: Cochrane Injuries' Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, three other databases and two clinical trials registers. The Cochrane Injuries' Information Specialist ran the searches.We selected all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving people with TBI who underwent different HBE or backrest positions. Studies may have had a parallel or cross-over design

2017 Cochrane

2. Prehospital CT for early diagnosis and treatment of suspected acute stroke or severe head injury

Prehospital CT for early diagnosis and treatment of suspected acute stroke or severe head injury Prehospital CT for early diagnosis and treatment of suspected acute stroke or severe head injury - NIPH Search for: Søk Menu To top level Close Infectious diseases & Vaccines Mental & Physical health Environment & Lifestyle Health in Norway Quality & Knowledge Research & Access to data About NIPH Close Prehospital CT for early diagnosis and treatment of suspected acute stroke or severe head injury (...) Stroke is the second leading mortality cause in most Western countries, and a major cause of adult disability. In Norway, approximately 12,000 persons experience acute stroke each year. In 2017, 8,789 cases of acute stroke were recorded in the Norwegian Stroke Registry (covering 86% of acute stroke patients). Head injuries also constitute a large group of patients arriving at the emergency ward, and are the leading cause of death in persons under the age of 44 years. Those considered to have severe

2019 Norwegian Institute of Public Health

3. Case-control study: Height of head centre of gravity predicts paediatric head injury severity in short-distance falls

Case-control study: Height of head centre of gravity predicts paediatric head injury severity in short-distance falls Height of head centre of gravity predicts paediatric head injury severity in short-distance falls | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Height of head centre of gravity predicts paediatric head injury severity in short-distance falls Article Text Prognosis Case-control study Height of head centre of gravity

2017 Evidence-Based Medicine

4. The Incidence and Management of Moderate to Severe Head Injury. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Incidence and Management of Moderate to Severe Head Injury. The comprehensive expansion of the Trauma Register of the German Trauma Society (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie; TR-DGU) now enables, for the first time, studies on traumatic brain injury (TBI) with special attention to care processes, clinical course, and outcomes of treatment on discharge or transfer from the acute-care hospital.Retrospective analysis of patients documented in the TR-DGU in the period 2013-2017 who had (...) moderate to severe head injury as defined by the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS).In the period 2013-2017, 41 101 patients with moderate to severe TBI were treated in TR-DGU-associated hospitals in Germany (n = 605 hospitals), corresponding to 8220 cases per year and thus to a population-wide incidence of 10.1 cases per 100 000 persons per year. TBI was present as an isolated injury in 39.1% of cases. The mean age of the patients was 60 years (median; range 0-104 years), and the male-to-female ratio

2019 Deutsches Arzteblatt international

5. Clinical Practice Guideline on the Management of Rotator Cuff Injuries

Clinical Practice Guideline on the Management of Rotator Cuff Injuries View background material via the RC CPG eAppendix 1 View data summaries via the RC CPG eAppendix 2 1 MANAGEMENT OF ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE Adopted by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Board of Directors March 11, 2019 Endorsed by: Please cite this guideline as: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Management of Rotator Cuff Injuries Clinical Practice Guideline. https://www.aaos.org (...) /rotatorcuffinjuriescpg Published March 11, 2019 View background material via the RC CPG eAppendix 1 View data summaries via the RC CPG eAppendix 2 2 Disclaimer This Clinical Practice Guideline was developed by an AAOS physician volunteer Clinical Practice Guideline development group based on a systematic review of the current scientific and clinical information and accepted approaches to management of rotator cuff injuries. This clinical practice guideline is not intended to be a fixed protocol, as some patients may

2020 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

6. Diagnosis and Management of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary in the Head and Neck

Diagnosis and Management of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary in the Head and Neck Diagnosis and Management of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary in the Head and Neck: ASCO Guideline | Journal of Clinical Oncology Search in: Menu > > > > Article Tools ASCO SPECIAL ARTICLES Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JCO.20.00275 Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print April 23, 2020 PMID: Diagnosis (...) and Management of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary in the Head and Neck: ASCO Guideline , MD 1 x Ellie Maghami ; , MD 2 x Nofisat Ismaila ; , MD 3 x Adriana Alvarez ; , MD 4 x Rebecca Chernock ; , MD, PhD 5 x Umamaheswar Duvvuri ; , MD 3 x Jessica Geiger ; , MD 6 x Neil Gross ; , MD 7 x Bruce Haughey ; , MD 8 x Doru Paul ; , MD 9 x Cristina Rodriguez ; , MD, MPH 10 x David Sher ; , MD 11 x Hilda E. Stambuk ; , MD 12 x John Waldron ; , MD, MS 13 x Matt Witek ; and , MD, PhD 14 x James Caudell 1 City

2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

7. Early Management of Head Injury in Adults

Injury xii for Head CT Algorithm 4. Selection of Adults with Head Injury xiii for Imaging of the Cervical Spine Algorithm 5. Management of Adults Patient with xiv Mild Head Injury Requiring Urgent Surgery other than Cranial Surgery 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. DEFINITION 3 3 CLASSIFICATION OF SEVERITY 5 4. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSES 6 5. PRE-HOSPITAL CARE (PHC) 6 5.1 Assessment and General Treatment 6 5.2 Initial Management 7 5.3 Referral or Discharge at Primary Care Setting 9 5.4 Transportation 11 6. MANAGEMENT (...) , they had a higher likelihood of disability and impairment upon discharge. It was concluded that improvement in access to trauma services for severely injured patients and standardisation in management of trauma care within hospitals in the country were required. 6, level III A specialty and subspecialty framework of MoH hospitals 10 th Malaysia Plan (2010 - 2015) reported that Hospital Kuala Lumpur and 13 states hospitals will be provided with neurosurgery subspecialty to manage complicated head injury

2015 Ministry of Health, Malaysia

8. Can S100B Serum Biomarker Testing Reduce Head Computed Tomography Scanning in Children With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury? Full Text available with Trip Pro

and low positive predictive value, thus somewhat limiting its ability to reduce the number of CT scans and hospital costs. x 8 Ruan, S., Noyes, K., and Bazarian, J.J. The economic impact of S-100B as a pre-head CT screening test on emergency department management of adult patients with mild traumatic brain injury. J Neurotrauma . 2009 ; 26 : 1655–1664 In addition, many facilities may not have immediate access to the results of the test, with personal experience showing a turnaround time of 3 to 18 (...) Can S100B Serum Biomarker Testing Reduce Head Computed Tomography Scanning in Children With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury? Can S100B Serum Biomarker Testing Reduce Head Computed Tomography Scanning in Children With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 73, Issue 5, Pages 456–458 Can S100B Serum Biomarker Testing Reduce Head Computed Tomography Scanning

2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

9. Management of Blunt Force Bladder Injuries

concomitantly. [ ] The purpose of this practice management guideline was to evaluate critical clinical questions regarding the diagnosis and management of bladder trauma resulting from blunt abdominoperineal trauma. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was used to provide evidence-based guidance. [ ] Throughout this guideline, we define bladder injuries/ruptures as being full thickness bladder lacerations/injuries. Typically, these injuries are repaired (...) the evaluation and management of blunt force bladder injuries (Fig. 7). Several recommendations are made. The need for initial CT cystography after trauma depends on characteristics of the trauma itself but is not recommended in patients without gross hematuria. In general, patients with intraperitoneal bladder ruptures should undergo operative repair, while this is not routinely necessary in those with extraperitoneal ruptures, unless the injury is complex. The need for follow-up cystography after bladder

2019 Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma

10. Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (4th edition)

monitoring Level IIB • Management of severe TBI patients using information from ICP monitoring is recommended to reduce in-hospital and 2-week post-injury mortality. Recommendations from the prior (Third) Edition not supported by evidence meeting current standards. ICP should be monitored in all salvageable patients with a TBI (GCS 3-8 after resuscitation) and an abnormal CT scan. An abnormal CT scan of the head is one that reveals hematomas, contusions, swelling, herniation, or compressed basal cisterns (...) Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (4th edition) We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, Fourth Edition | Neurosurgery | Oxford Academic Search Account Menu Menu Navbar Search Filter Mobile Microsite Search Term Close search filter search input Article Navigation

2016 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

11. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Initial Management of Concussion/mTBI

concussion/mTBI (see Appendices & ), which may be influenced by psychosocial factors and psychological responses to the injury. Patients who screen positive should be managed and referred to specialist services, if needed, since these conditions commonly complicate recovery. Adapted from the Motor Accidents Authority NSW, Guidelines for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury following a Closed Head Injury (MAA, NSW, 2008). Providing Education After mTBI New Key Section Level of evidence A B C Updated Evidence 2.6 (...) Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - Initial Management of Concussion/mTBI Initial Management of Concussion/mTBI // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age Initial Management of Concussion/mTBI Whether a patient first presents to the Emergency Department (ED) or to the primary care

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

12. Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - General Recommendations Regarding Management of Persistent Symptoms

presentation and considered in the management strategies. Adapted from the Motor Accidents Authority NSW, Guidelines for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury following a Closed Head Injury (MAA, NSW, 2008). 5.3 B Persons with concussion/mTBI and identified factors typically associated with persistent symptoms (see Table ) should be considered for early referral to an interdisciplinary treatment clinic including a physician with expertise in concussion/mTBI where available or interdisciplinary formal network (...) Guideline for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury & persistent symptoms - General Recommendations Regarding Management of Persistent Symptoms General Recommendations Regarding Management of Persistent Symptoms // Brain Injury Guidelines Toggle navigation NAVIGATION > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Guideline For Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury & Persistent Symptoms 3rd Edition, for Adults over 18 years of age General Recommendations Regarding Management of Persistent Symptoms

2018 Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation

13. Management of Perceived Devastating Brain Injury After Hospital Admission

stakeholder professional organisations to produce this guidance. This statement is intended to help consultants when making decisions on the management of patients admitted with a perceived devastating brain injury (DBI), and should not replace their clinical judgment. i CCU or ICU throughout this document ii also available open access at http://jounrals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/17511437166704104 Management of Perceived Devastating Brain Injury after Hospital Admission 2. DEFINITION OF DEVASTATING (...) been achieved by continued aggressive therapy. Also there is an emerging realisation that severe brain injury takes a long time to achieve maximal outcome, and the typical assessment of outcome at hospital discharge, or even at six months may underestimate the quality of survival, particularly in patients who have undergone extremely aggressive management 26 . Finally, societal expectations of what is accepted as a ‘life worth living’ are constantly being recalibrated, and many patients who

2018 Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine

14. Management of Severe Head Injury

Management of Severe Head Injury Management of Severe Head Injury Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Management of Severe (...) Head Injury Management of Severe Head Injury Aka: Management of Severe Head Injury , Severe Head Injury , Severe Head Trauma From Related Chapters II. Indications (GCS) <= 8 ( ) III. Evaluation See (ABCDE) lary light reaction Oculocephalic ( ): if no IV. Diagnostics: Testing in Unknown Injury Head Evaluation in all patients Air ventriculogram Cerebral Angiogram Spinal cord evaluation CT in most (if not all) patients Abdominal Evaluation If Systolic <100 mmHg or Exploratory Laparotomy/Celiotomy

2018 FP Notebook

15. Management of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Management of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common disorder with high morbidity and mortality, accounting for one in every three deaths due to injury. Older adults are especially vulnerable. They have the highest rates of TBI-related hospitalization and death. There are about 2.5 to 6.5 million US citizens living with TBI-related disabilities. The cost of care is very high. Aside from prevention, little can be done for the initial primary injury (...) intercede with interventions to improve outcome in the mitigating secondary injury. The fundamental concepts in critical care management of moderate and severe TBI focus on alleviating intracranial pressure and avoiding hypotension and hypoxia. In addition to these important considerations, mechanical ventilation, appropriate transfusion of blood products, management of paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity, using nutrition as a therapy, and, of course, venous thromboembolism and seizure prevention

2019 Transfusion

16. Spinal injury: assessment and initial management

Spinal injury: assessment and initial management Spinal injury: assessment and initial Spinal injury: assessment and initial management management NICE guideline Published: 17 February 2016 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng41 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration (...) ) unless otherwise specified. 1.1 Assessment and management in pre-hospital settings Assessment for spinal injury Assessment for spinal injury 1.1.1 On arrival at the scene of the incident, use a prioritising sequence to assess people with suspected trauma, for example ABCDE: catastrophic haemorrhage airway with in-line spinal immobilisation (for guidance on airway management refer to the NICE guideline on major trauma) breathing circulation disability (neurological) exposure and environment. 1.1.2

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

17. External validation of the Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injuries in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

External validation of the Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injuries in children. Clinical decision rules (CDRs) aid in the management of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recently, the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee (SNC) has published practical, evidence-based guidelines for children with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 9-15. This study aims to validate these guidelines and to compare them with other CDRs.A large prospective cohort (...) of children (< 18 years) with TBI of all severities, from ten Australian and New Zealand hospitals, was used to assess the SNC guidelines. Firstly, a validation study was performed according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the SNC guideline. Secondly, we compared the accuracy of SNC, CATCH, CHALICE and PECARN CDRs in patients with GCS 13-15 only. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated for outcome measures of need for neurosurgery, clinically important TBI (ciTBI) and brain injury on CT.The SNC

2018 BMC Medicine

18. Association of clinically important traumatic brain injury and Glasgow Coma Scale scores in children with head injury

Association of clinically important traumatic brain injury and Glasgow Coma Scale scores in children with head injury Association of Clinically Important Traumatic Brain Injury and Glasgow Coma Scale Scores in Children With Head Injury - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Welcome to the new PubMed. For legacy PubMed go to . Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily (...) Create file Cancel Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Emerg Med J Actions . 2020 Mar;37(3):127-134. doi: 10.1136/emermed-2018-208154. Epub 2020 Feb 12. Association of Clinically Important Traumatic Brain Injury and Glasgow Coma Scale Scores in Children With Head Injury , , , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Emergency Department, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia amit.kochar@sa.gov.au. 2 PREDICT, Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments

2020 EvidenceUpdates

19. Head Injury and patients on Anticoagulation/Antiplatelet Therapies

management in patients on anti-coagulant or antiplatelet therapy. Guideline. Alfred Health Victoria. Accessed via PROMPT March 2017. 3. National Institute of Health and Care Excellence. 2014. Head Injury: Triage, assessment, investigation and early management of head injury in children, young people and adults. NICE. Accessed March 2016. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg176/evidence/full-guideline-191719837 4. Washington State Department of Health Office of Community Health Systems. 2016. Trauma (...) should be made available within 1 hour of the scan being performed. ? See Pg 119 - 122 of full guideline 5 Guideline Early Management – CT Scan CT scanning is the preferred method of imaging if available and should be performed early in the severe to moderate TBI group. Except for an uncomplicated minor head injury, ideally all patients with a significant head injury should have a CT scan. If it appears that the patient will require transfer to an MTS, the decision as to whether to conduct a CT prior

2017 Monash Health Evidence Reviews

20. Head Injury: minor, minimal or trivial. The difference matters!

Anticoagulation or bleeding diasthasis Age <2 or >65 WITH a severe headache, nausea/vomiting Extracranial injuries that alone require admission The authors ultimately concluded that a minority of patients with minimal head injury will have pathology, and that there is clearly a need for guidelines to help minimize the over-utilization of imaging in these patients. Scandinavian Guidelines Since then, only guidelines created to help us in the management of the patient with minimal head injury come from (...) injury: results of a prospective study. J Neurosurg . 2004;100(5):825-834. [ ] 4. Stein S, Spettell C. The Head Injury Severity Scale (HISS): a practical classification of closed-head injury. Brain Inj . 1995;9(5):437-444. [ ] 5. Undén J, Ingebrigtsen T, Romner B, Scandinavian N. Scandinavian guidelines for initial management of minimal, mild and moderate head injuries in adults: an evidence and consensus-based update. BMC Med . 2013;11:50. [ ] 6. Undén L, Calcagnile O, Undén J, Reinstrup P, Bazarian

2018 CandiEM

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