How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

200 results for

MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. ACR–ASNR–SCBT-MR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the Adult Spine

ACR–ASNR–SCBT-MR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the Adult Spine PRACTICE PARAMETER 1 MRI Adult Spine The American College of Radiology, with more than 30,000 members, is the principal organization of radiologists, radiation oncologists, and clinical medical physicists in the United States. The College is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science of radiology, improve radiologic services to the patient, study (...) in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice parameter and technical standard by those entities not providing these services is not authorized. Revised 2018 (Resolution 19)* ACR –ASNR –SCBT-MR –SSR PRACTICE PARAMETER FOR THE PERFORMANCE OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) OF THE ADULT SPINE PREAMBLE This document is an educational tool designed to assist practitioners in providing appropriate radiologic care for patients. Practice Parameters and Technical Standards

2019 American Society of Neuroradiology

2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

hypotension cigarette smoking hereditary/family history increased age male sex (prevalence) female sex (rupture) congenital/connective tissue disorders hyperlipidaemia COPD atherosclerosis (i.e., coronary artery disease [CAD], peripheral arterial occlusive disease) hypertension increased height central obesity non-diabetic Diagnostic investigations abdominal ultrasound ESR/CRP FBC blood cultures computed tomography angiography (CTA)/CT magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)/MRI Treatment algorithm ACUTE (...) for initial diagnosis and screening. Imaging with computed tomography angiography or magnetic resonance angiography is used for anatomical mapping to assist with operative planning. For AAA detected as an incidental finding, surveillance is preferred to repair until the theoretical risk of rupture exceeds the estimated risk of operative mortality. Repair is indicated in patients with large asymptomatic AAA. Mortality during elective surgical repair is higher for women than men for both open repair (7.0

2018 BMJ Best Practice

3. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Follow-up (Without Repair)

contrast May Be Appropriate O MRI abdomen and pelvis without IV contrast May Be Appropriate (Disagreement) O Aortography abdomen Usually Not Appropriate ??? Radiography chest abdomen pelvis Usually Not Appropriate ??? ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 2 AAA Follow-up (Without Repair) ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM FOLLOW-UP (WITHOUT REPAIR) Expert Panel on Vascular Imaging: Michael Collard, MD, MA a ; Patrick D. Sutphin, MD, PhD b ; Sanjeeva P. Kalva, MD c ; Bill S. Majdalany, MD d ; Jeremy D. Collins, MD e (...) for urologic disease: our experience. Arch Ital Urol Androl 2012;84:230-3. 11. Khashram M, Jones GT, Roake JA. Prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in a population undergoing computed tomography colonography in Canterbury, New Zealand. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg 2015;50:199-205. 12. Trompeter AJ, Paremain GP. Incidental abdominal aortic aneurysm on lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging - a case series. Magn Reson Imaging 2010;28:455-7. 13. Claridge R, Arnold S, Morrison N, van Rij AM. Measuring

2019 American College of Radiology

4. MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm

MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm Aka: MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm , AAA Magnetic Resonance Angiography II. Indications Preoperative evaluation of AAA III. Efficacy : 100% IV. Advantages Identifies proximal and distal margins of aneurysm Identifies periaortic renal V. Disadvantages Motion artifact if movement during scan VI. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing (...) MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4

2018 FP Notebook

5. The Society for Vascular Surgery practice guidelines on the care of patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm Full Text available with Trip Pro

approach for patients requiring OSR of an inflammatory aneurysm, a horseshoe kidney, or an aortic aneurysm in the presence of a hostile abdomen. Level of recommendation 1 (Strong) Quality of evidence C (Low) We suggest a retroperitoneal exposure or a transperitoneal approach with a transverse abdominal incision for patients with significant pulmonary disease requiring OSR. Level of recommendation 2 (Weak) Quality of evidence C (Low) We recommend a thrombin inhibitor, such as bivalirudin or argatroban (...) efficacy value in terms of sensitivity and specificity of imaging modalities in detecting the abdominal aortic aneurysm: a systematic review. Int J Med Eng Inform . 2015 ; 7 : 15–35 | | Concannon, 2014 8 x 8 Concannon, E., McHugh, S., Healy, D.A., Kavanagh, E., Burke, P., Clarke Moloney, M. et al. Diagnostic accuracy of non-radiologist performed ultrasound for abdominal aortic aneurysm: systematic review and meta-analysis. Int J Clin Pract . 2014 ; 68 : 1122–1129 | | | Diagnostic accuracy of imaging

2018 Society for Vascular Surgery

6. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Interventional Planning and Follow-up

. 2015;61(2):298-303. 46. American College of Radiology. Manual on Contrast Media. Available at: http://www.acr.org/Quality- Safety/Resources/Contrast-Manual. Accessed September 1, 2017. 47. Nguyen VL, Leiner T, Hellenthal FA, et al. Abdominal aortic aneurysms with high thrombus signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging are associated with high growth rate. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014;48(6):676-684. 48. Hoffmann B, Bessman ES, Um P, Ding R, McCarthy ML. Successful sonographic visualisation (...) assessment of artifacts for various stent orientations, sequence types, and field strengths. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2000;12(4):606-615. 78. Ayuso JR, de Caralt TM, Pages M, et al. MRA is useful as a follow-up technique after endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms with nitinol endoprostheses. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2004;20(5):803-810. 79. Habets J, Zandvoort HJ, Reitsma JB, et al. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive than computed tomography angiography for the detection of endoleaks after

2017 American College of Radiology

7. Pulsatile Abdominal Mass, Suspected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

(3):452-458. 6. Wanhainen A, Themudo R, Ahlstrom H, Lind L, Johansson L. Thoracic and abdominal aortic dimension in 70-year-old men and women--a population-based whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. J Vasc Surg. 2008;47(3):504-512. 7. Richards T, Dharmadasa A, Davies R, Murphy M, Perera R, Walton J. Natural history of the common iliac artery in the presence of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. J Vasc Surg. 2009;49(4):881-885. 8. Schermerhorn ML, Cronenwett JL. Chapter 100 - Abdominal (...) without IV contrast 7 ??? CT abdomen with IV contrast 7 ??? CT abdomen without and with IV contrast 7 ???? MRA abdomen without IV contrast 7 O Aortography abdomen 4 ??? FDG-PET/CT abdomen 2 ???? Rating Scale: 1,2,3 Usually not appropriate; 4,5,6 May be appropriate; 7,8,9 Usually appropriate *Relative Radiation Level ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 2 Pulsatile Abdominal Mass, Suspected AAA PULSATILE ABDOMINAL MASS, SUSPECTED ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM Expert Panel on Vascular Imaging: Stephen P. Reis, MD

2016 American College of Radiology

8. Segmentation of Lumen and Outer wall of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms from 3D Black-Blood MRI with a Registration Based Geodesic Active Contour Model Full Text available with Trip Pro

Segmentation of Lumen and Outer wall of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms from 3D Black-Blood MRI with a Registration Based Geodesic Active Contour Model Segmentation of the geometric morphology of abdominal aortic aneurysm is important for interventional planning. However, the segmentation of both the lumen and the outer wall of aneurysm in magnetic resonance (MR) image remains challenging. This study proposes a registration based segmentation methodology for efficiently segmenting MR images (...) of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The proposed methodology first registers the contrast enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) and black-blood MR images, and then uses the Hough transform and geometric active contours to extract the vessel lumen by delineating the inner vessel wall directly from the CE-MRA. The proposed registration based geometric active contour is applied to black-blood MR images to generate the outer wall contour. The inner and outer vessel wall are then fused presenting the complete vessel

2017 Medical Image Analysis

9. Suspected Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

, Schoenberg SO. MRA of abdominal vessels: technical advances. Eur Radiol. 2006;16(8):1637-1650. 41. Gauvrit JY, Law M, Xu J, Carson R, Sunenshine P, Chen Q. Time-resolved MR angiography: optimal parallel imaging method. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2007;28(5):835-838. ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 8 Suspected Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm 42. Kramer U, Nael K, Fenchel M, Miller S. Magnetic resonance angiography of chest and abdomen at 3 T. Top Magn Reson Imaging. 2007;18(2):105-115. 43. Bireley WR, 2nd, Diniz LO (...) echocardiography, helical computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for suspected thoracic aortic dissection: systematic review and meta-analysis. Arch Intern Med. 2006;166(13):1350-1356. ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® 7 Suspected Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm 20. Kurabayashi M, Okishige K, Ueshima D, et al. Diagnostic utility of unenhanced computed tomography for acute aortic syndrome. Circ J. 2014;78(8):1928-1934. 21. Davenport MS, Khalatbari S, Cohan RH, Dillman JR, Myles JD, Ellis JH. Contrast

2017 American College of Radiology

10. MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm

MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm Aka: MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm , AAA Magnetic Resonance Angiography II. Indications Preoperative evaluation of AAA III. Efficacy : 100% IV. Advantages Identifies proximal and distal margins of aneurysm Identifies periaortic renal V. Disadvantages Motion artifact if movement during scan VI. References Images: Related links to external sites (from Bing) These images are a random sampling from a Bing (...) MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm MRI with MRA in abdominal aortic aneurysm Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4

2015 FP Notebook

11. Appropriate Use Criteria: Imaging of the Abdomen & Pelvis

a reliable diagnostic tool in the evaluation of active Crohn’s disease in the small bowel? J Clin Gastroenterol. 2013;47(4):328-338.MRI Abdomen | Copyright © 2018. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. 15 CPT Codes 74181 MRI of abdomen, without contrast 74182 MRI of abdomen, with contrast 74183 MRI of abdomen, without contrast, followed by re-imaging with contrast Standard Anatomic Coverage ? Scan coverage depends on the specific clinical indication for the abdominal MRI. General landmarks extend (...) an inconclusive or abnormal abdominal ultrasound or CT ? Including the following hepatic disorders: ? Cirrhosis ? Chronic hepatitis Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) AbdomenMRI Abdomen | Copyright © 2018. AIM Specialty Health. All Rights Reserved. 16 Common Diagnostic Indications Focal liver lesions Indeterminate lesions (not biopsied and not fully characterized by prior imaging) ? Initial evaluation of an indeterminate lesion identified on prior imaging when any of the following are present: ? Size > 1 cm

2018 AIM Specialty Health

12. Peripheral Arterial Disease (Lower Extremity, Renal, Mesenteric, and Abdominal Aortic): Guidelines For the Management of Patients With

April 9, 2013:1555–704.2. Chronic Intestinal Ischemia 1566 4.2.1. Diagnosis 1566 4.2.2. Endovascular Treatment for Chronic Intestinal Ischemia 1566 4.2.3. Surgical Treatment 1566 5. Aneurysms of the Abdominal Aorta, Its Branch Vessels, and the Lower Extremities: Recommendations 1567 5.1. Abdominal Aortic and Iliac Aneurysms 1567 5.1.1. Etiology 1567 5.1.1.1. ATHEROSCLEROTIC RISK FACTORS 1567 5.1.2. Natural History 1567 5.1.2.1. AORTIC ANEURYSM RUPTURE 1567 5.1.3. Diagnosis 1567 5.1.3.1. SYMPTOMATIC (...) should be asked if they have a family history of a ?rst-order relative with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). (Level of Evidence: C) 2. Lower Extremity PAD: Recommendations 2.1. Clinical Presentation 2.1.1. Asymptomatic CLASS I 1. A history of walking impairment, claudication, ischemic rest pain, and/or nonhealing wounds is recommended as a required componentofastandardreviewofsymptomsforadults50years andolderwhohaveatherosclerosisriskfactorsandforadults70 years and older. (Level of Evidence: C) 2

2013 American College of Cardiology

13. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in the Management of Adults With Aortic Stenosis

echocardiography; ECG ¼ electrocardiogram; EF ¼ ejection fraction; ESRD ¼ end-stage renal disease; fx ¼ fracture; GFR ¼ glomerular ?ltration rate; LFLG ¼ low-?ow low-gradient; LV ¼ left ventricular; LVEF ¼ left ventricular ejection fraction; MAC ¼ mitral annular calci?cation; MDCT ¼ multidetector computed tomography; MR¼ mitral regurgitation; MRA¼ magnetic resonance angiogram; MRI¼ magnetic resonance imaging; MS¼ mitral stenosis; PA¼ pulmonary artery; PET¼ positronemissiontomography;RV¼rightventricular;TAVR (...) in whom iodinated contrast is absolutely contraindicated, alternative imag- ing includes magnetic resonance imaging for vascular access and transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) for valve sizing, but highly depends on local expertise and will likely require multimodality integration (Figure 3) (35). 5.2.2. Preprocedural Evaluation 5.2.2.1. Aortic Valve Morphology Initial visualization of the aortic valve is performed with TTE, which in most instances allows for clear imaging of the aortic valve

2017 American College of Cardiology

14. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Written by the Standards of Practice Committee for the Society of Interventional Radiology and Endorsed by the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe

expected from all physi- cians who perform EVAR procedures. The most important processes of care are: (i) preprocedural imaging and planning,(ii)appropriategraftandpa- tient selection, (iii) performance of the procedure, (iv) postprocedural sur- veillance, and (v) management of EVAR-related complications. The out- come measures or indicators for these processes are indications, success rates, and complication rates, and are assigned threshold levels. DEFINITIONS Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Abdominal (...) section of the aorta, and is a “true” aneurysm involving all three layers of the aortic wall. Saccular AAAs are more focal and localized and may be asymmetric or may occur as pseudoaneurysms that do not in- volve all mural layers. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Endovascular abdominal aortic an- eurysm repair is defined as treatment of an AAA through image-guided placement of a stent-graft device (en- doprosthesis) within the native ab- dominal aorta, securing device fixa- tion to the vascular wall

2010 Society of Interventional Radiology

15. Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Reporting Standards for Type B Aortic Dissections

true malperfusion, the radiographic ?nding may simply bere?ectiveofthephasingofCTA,typically whenoneof the renal arteries arises from the false lumen. Delayed venous- or renal-phase imaging can help delineate whetherakidneyisbeingperfusedascontrastmaterialin the collecting system is indicative of at least modest perfusion. Radioisotope renography (ie, MAG3 scan) can also help demonstrate renal perfusion, as can renal ul- trasound or dynamic MRI or magnetic resonance angi- ography (MRA). 61-63 Acute (...) Refractory pain Refractory hypertension Bloody pleural effusion Aortic diameter>40 mm Radiographic only malperfusion Readmission Entry tear: lesser curve location False lumen diameter>22 mm Complicated Rupture Malperfusion 10 REPORT LOMBARDI ET AL Ann Thorac Surg STANDARDS FOR TYPE B AORTIC DISSECTIONS 2020;-:---septal dynamics or ?ow throughout the cardiac cycle. A physiologic study, such as gated CTA, intravascular ul- trasound, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may help delineate dynamic

2020 Society of Thoracic Surgeons

16. Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) reporting standards for type B aortic dissections Full Text available with Trip Pro

Classification System. ---- | ---- Fig 8 Type B aortic dissection (TBAD) with visualization of entry tear ( arrow ) in the descending thoracic aorta. ---- | ---- Fig 9 Noncontrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrating intramural hematoma ( IMH ) of the descending thoracic aorta. Note that the IMH appears bright on nonenhanced imaging. ---- | ---- Fig 10 Example of the gross pathologic appearance of an intramural hematoma (IMH), in this case of the ascending aorta, as seen during central repair (...) ., and Kime, S.W. Jr. Dissecting aneurysm of the aorta: a review of 505 cases. Medicine (Baltimore) . 1958 ; 37 : 217–279 | | | who observed that mortality in patients with type A and type B aortic dissection significantly decreased after 14 days. Using this time point, the authors defined acute aortic dissection as ≤14 days from symptom onset and chronic aortic dissection as >14 days from symptom onset. Since this original report, there have been significant advancements in diagnostic imaging, medical

2020 Society for Vascular Surgery

17. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Rupture

is adequately assessed by using B-mode ultrasonography, CT scanning, and MRI. [ , , ] Aortography reveals only the lumen of the abdominal aortic aneurysm because laminated clot obscures the outer limit of the aneurysm wall. Therefore, it often causes underestimation of the true aortic diameter. Key pathobiologic processes of AAA progression and rupture include neovascularization, necrotic inflammation, microcalcification, and proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix. Future ancillary imaging (...) pre-repair AAA CTAs, AAA contrast inhomogeneity was found to be a common observation in first-pass CTA and was associated with rapid aneurysm growth, independent of aneurysm diameter. [ ] Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has the advantage of eliminating the need for potentially nephrotoxic contrast agents and ionizing radiation, but its acquisition speed, cost, and image quality still need to be improved. Ferromagnetic implants or severe claustrophobia also can preclude use of MRI and/or MRA

2014 eMedicine Radiology

18. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Diagnosis

obscure the aorta. Previous Next: Magnetic Resonance Imaging MRI and MRA can be used to define the extent of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). The absence of iodinated contrast material and radiation are advantages of this modality. However, MRI is more sensitive to motion than is CT, because a patient must remain motionless for a longer period than with current multidetector-row helical CT technology. In addition, the remaining organs in the abdomen are not seen as well on MRIs because of motion (...) angiography (CTA) is the best diagnostic and preintervention planning study, accurately delineating the location, size, and extent of aneurysm and the involvement of branch vessels. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) may be substituted if CT cannot be performed. Catheter arteriography has some utility in patients with significant contraindications to both CTA and MRA. The radiologic characteristics of AAAs are demonstrated in the images below. Radiograph shows calcification of the abdominal aorta

2014 eMedicine Radiology

19. Guidelines for the management of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms Full Text available with Trip Pro

, epidemiology, risk factors, screening, diagnosis, imaging and outcomes from surgical and endovascular treatment. Introduction Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) are relatively common in the general population, found in ≈3.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9%–5.2%) of the adult population (mean age 50 years) worldwide, and they are being discovered incidentally with an increasing frequency because of the widespread use of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. The large majority (...) that used magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), there was no difference in prevalence, but prevalence was significantly lower in studies that used MRI and remained lower after adjustment for age and sex. When the studies that primarily used MRI were excluded, the overall prevalence was 3.5% (95% CI, 2.7%–4.7%). Although the crude prevalence of UIAs was higher in studies using imaging versus autopsy definitions, there was no difference in prevalence estimates after adjustment for sex, age

2015 American Academy of Neurology

20. Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

in the general population, found in ˜3.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9%–5.2%) of the adult population (mean age 50 years) worldwide, and they are being discov- ered incidentally with an increasing frequency because of the widespread use of high-resolution magnetic resonance imag- ing (MRI) scanning. The large majority of UIAs will never rupture. For example, of the 1 million adults in the general population with a mean age of 50 years, ˜32 000 harbor a UIA, but only 0.25% of these, or 1 in 200 to 400 (...) for MRI, care should be taken to ensure that the metallic implants are compatible with the magnetic environment of the MRI scanner. 170–172 In the follow-up of treated UIAs, magnetic resonance is a reasonable option given the high sensitivity for a residual aneurysm, lack of beam-hardening artifacts seen with CT, and invasiveness of DSA. For untreated UIAs already diagnosed, the lack of ionizing radiation or contrast (for TOF MRA) would make it the option of choice in those patients with renal

2015 Congress of Neurological Surgeons

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>