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Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis

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1. Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis

Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis (...) Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis Aka: Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis , Nocardia brasiliensis , Nocardia , Nocardiosis , Cutaneous Nocardiosis From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Filamentous gram-positive Causes Nocardia brasiliensis most common etiology III. Exposure risks Soil or plant debris (e.g. gardening) Splinters IV. Signs Primary lesion follows one to six week incubation Tender nodular lesion develops at inoculation site Secondary lesions Erythematous s, s develop up lymph chain Lesions ulcerate

2018 FP Notebook

2. Nodular Lymphangitis (Sporotrichoid Lymphocutaneous Infections). Clues to Differential Diagnosis (PubMed)

Nodular Lymphangitis (Sporotrichoid Lymphocutaneous Infections). Clues to Differential Diagnosis Nodular lymphangitis, also known as sporotrichoid lymphocutaneous infections, is characterized by suppurative inflammatory nodules along the lymphatic vessels. This manifestation is classic of sporotrichosis, however, other infections such as nocardiosis, atypical mycobacteriosis, leishmaniasis, among others, can also express this clinical pattern. Sporotrichosis, which often occurs in gardeners (...) , remains the most recognized cause of nodular lymphangitis. The histopathological studies, as well as the culture are diagnostic standards of lesions that do not respond to empirical treatment. In this article, we will review the main causes of nodular lymphangitis or lymphocutaneous sporotrichoid infections.

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2018 Journal of Fungi

3. An unusual successful treatment with non-sulfonamides: primary cutaneous nocardiosis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis (PubMed)

of the disease.The presented cases are patients of acute suppurative cutaneous infection without involvement of other organs. We report four cases, of which two cases were localized cutaneous nocardiosis and the other two were lymphocutaneous type of nocardiosis. All cases were diagnosed with pus culture which turned out to be Nocardia brasiliensis. We report an improvement of primary cutaneous nocardiosis symptoms in the four patients treated with non-sulfonamides. All patients were cured and recovered without (...) An unusual successful treatment with non-sulfonamides: primary cutaneous nocardiosis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis Primary cutaneous nocardiosis is a rare suppurative or granulomatous inflammation disease caused by Nocardia infection. Because of nonspecific clinical findings, it is always misdiagnosed as common pyogenic infection. Sulfonamides have been the standard treatment for nocardiosis, but the outcome is always poor due to the high rates of misdiagnosis and refractoriness

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2018 Therapeutics and clinical risk management

4. Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis

Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis (...) Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis Aka: Lymphocutaneous Nocardiosis , Nocardia brasiliensis , Nocardia , Nocardiosis , Cutaneous Nocardiosis From Related Chapters II. Pathophysiology Filamentous gram-positive Causes Nocardia brasiliensis most common etiology III. Exposure risks Soil or plant debris (e.g. gardening) Splinters IV. Signs Primary lesion follows one to six week incubation Tender nodular lesion develops at inoculation site Secondary lesions Erythematous s, s develop up lymph chain Lesions ulcerate

2015 FP Notebook

5. Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis (PubMed)

Cutaneous Nocardiosis Simulating Cutaneous Lymphatic Sporotrichosis Sporotrichosis is the subcutaneous mycosis caused by several species of the Sporothrix genus. With worldwide occurrence, the State of Rio de Janeiro is presently undergoing a zoonotic sporotrichosis epidemic. The form of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare, being caused especially by Nocardia brasiliensis. It appears as a nodular or ulcerated lesion, with multiple painful erythematous nodules or satellite pustules distributed (...) is a resident of the city of Rio de Janeiro. While culture results were being awaited, the patient was medicated with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim to cover CA-MRSA and evolved with total healing of the lesions. After hospital discharge, using an ulcer fragment, an Actinomyces sp. was cultivated and N. brasiliensis was identified by molecular biology. The objective of this report is to demonstrate a case of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis caused by N. brasiliensis after a probable insect bite. Despite

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2017 Case reports in dermatology

6. Disseminated nocardiosis caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an immunocompetent host: A case report and literature review (PubMed)

Disseminated nocardiosis caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in an immunocompetent host: A case report and literature review The aim of the present study was to summarize the clinical characteristics of nocardiosis caused by Nocardia otitidiscaviarum in order to improve the knowledge of nocardiosis. A case of dissemination nocardiosis caused by N. otitidiscaviarum in an immunocompetent host is reported and the associated literature reviewed. Informed consent for publication of this case report (...) was provided by the patient. The present patient was a young immunocompetent man suffering from disseminated nocardiosis induced by infection with N. otitidiscaviarum. Following a poor response to β-lactam antibiotic, a combination of sulfonamide with minocycline was administered, which successfully ameliorated the symptoms. Previous studies published in English were retrieved from PubMed with 'Nocardia otitidiscaviarum' used as the search keyword. A total of 23 articles were retrieved from the PubMed

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2016 Experimental and therapeutic medicine

7. A Primary Cutaneous Nocardiosis of the Hand (PubMed)

A Primary Cutaneous Nocardiosis of the Hand Nocardiosis is caused by an aerobic actinomycete, most commonly introduced through the respiratory tract. The Nocardiae are gram-positive, partially acid-fast bacteria. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis infections are rare and caused by the traumatic introduction of organisms percutaneously. The manifestation is usually an opportunistic infection. Cutaneous involvement may develop as one of four types: mycetoma, lymphocutaneous infection, superficial skin (...) was treated during nine months with sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim. There was an important clinical improvement of the cutaneous aspect of the lesions in hand. Some scars and fibrosis remained after nocardiosis.Primary cutaneous nocardiosis of the hand is a rare condition. The clinical diagnosis is difficult, and culture is mandatory.

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2017 Open access Macedonian journal of medical sciences

8. Nocardiosis (Overview)

common underlying risk factors for disseminated nocardiosis. [ , , ] Red nodules on a patient with disseminated nocardiosis. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis Primary cutaneous nocardiosis, most commonly caused by Nocardia brasiliensis , typically affects immunocompetent individuals with a history of trauma and can be subdivided into 3 clinical entities that include (1) lymphocutaneous infection, (2) mycetoma, and (3) superficial skin infection, including ulceration, abscess, and cellulitis. Involvement (...) of the skin can occur as a result of secondary dissemination from systemic infection. Cutaneous involvement with N asteroides is usually secondary to hematogenous dissemination from a pulmonary focus. Dissemination to the skin is estimated to occur in approximately 10% of patients with systemic nocardial infection, second in incidence only to CNS involvement. [ , , , ] Ulcer on the arm of a patient with primary cutaneous nocardiosis. Lymphocutaneous nocardiosis Lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare

2014 eMedicine.com

9. Nocardiosis (Overview)

Kurdgelashvili, MD; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Nocardiosis Overview Background Nocardiosis is an acute, subacute, or chronic infectious disease that occurs in cutaneous, pulmonary, and disseminated forms. manifests as cutaneous infection ( or abscess), lymphocutaneous infection (sporotrichoid nocardiosis), or subcutaneous infection (actinomycetoma). Pleuropulmonary nocardiosis manifests as an acute, subacute, or chronic pneumonitis, usually (...) are typically weakly acid-fast after traditional staining and positive on modified acid-fast staining, but this is not invariable. The cutaneous, lymphocutaneous, and subcutaneous forms of nocardiosis arise from local traumatic inoculation. These infections are not necessarily associated with immunocompromised host states, but dissemination from these sites of inoculation is more likely in immunocompromised hosts, particularly those with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Pleuropulmonary nocardiosis

2014 eMedicine.com

10. Nocardiosis (Treatment)

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ). Outpatient antibiotics are much more easily administered in oral form, and oral antibiotics have been shown to be just as effective as intravenous forms in patients with cutaneous disease. Next: Surgical Care Surgical debridement or excision often is vital in the treatment of nocardiosis. Surgery is most helpful in abscesses and mycetomas, but it can also help resolve lymphocutaneous infection. In a review of nocardial lymphocutaneous syndrome published in 1999 (...) and review. Clin Infect Dis . 1995 May. 20(5):1266-70. . Gray TJ, Serisier DJ, Gilpin CM, Coulter C, Bowler SJ, McCormack JG. Nocardia paucivorans--a cause of disseminated nocardiosis. J Infect . 2007 Feb. 54(2):e95-8. . Smego RA Jr, Castiglia M, Asperilla MO. Lymphocutaneous syndrome. A review of non-sporothrix causes. Medicine (Baltimore) . 1999 Jan. 78(1):38-63. . Lewis KE, Ebden P, Wooster SL, Rees J, Harrison GA. Multi-system Infection with Nocardia farcinica-therapy with linezolid and minocycline

2014 eMedicine.com

11. Nocardiosis (Follow-up)

trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ). Outpatient antibiotics are much more easily administered in oral form, and oral antibiotics have been shown to be just as effective as intravenous forms in patients with cutaneous disease. Next: Surgical Care Surgical debridement or excision often is vital in the treatment of nocardiosis. Surgery is most helpful in abscesses and mycetomas, but it can also help resolve lymphocutaneous infection. In a review of nocardial lymphocutaneous syndrome published in 1999 (...) and review. Clin Infect Dis . 1995 May. 20(5):1266-70. . Gray TJ, Serisier DJ, Gilpin CM, Coulter C, Bowler SJ, McCormack JG. Nocardia paucivorans--a cause of disseminated nocardiosis. J Infect . 2007 Feb. 54(2):e95-8. . Smego RA Jr, Castiglia M, Asperilla MO. Lymphocutaneous syndrome. A review of non-sporothrix causes. Medicine (Baltimore) . 1999 Jan. 78(1):38-63. . Lewis KE, Ebden P, Wooster SL, Rees J, Harrison GA. Multi-system Infection with Nocardia farcinica-therapy with linezolid and minocycline

2014 eMedicine.com

12. Nocardiosis (Diagnosis)

. [ ] Nocardiosis is an acute, subacute, or chronic suppurative infection caused by Nocardia. It has a pronounced tendency to remission and exacerbation. Infections are localized or disseminated. Localized cutaneous or lymphocutaneous infections usually occur after contamination of an abrasion, resulting in cutaneous or lymphocutaneous abscess. In children with immunocompetence, systemic spread from the primary skin site is extremely rare. Disseminated and fulminant disease mainly occurs in immunocompromised (...) Nocardiosis (Diagnosis) Pediatric Nocardiosis: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTY2OTE5LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Pediatric Nocardiosis Updated: Aug 14, 2018

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

13. Nocardiosis (Treatment)

Nocardiosis (Treatment) Pediatric Nocardiosis Treatment & Management: Medical Care, Surgical Care, Consultations Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTY2OTE5LXRyZWF0bWVudA== processing > Pediatric (...) Nocardiosis Treatment & Management Updated: Aug 14, 2018 Author: Nicholas John Bennett, MBBCh, PhD, MA(Cantab), FAAP; Chief Editor: Russell W Steele, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Pediatric Nocardiosis Treatment Medical Care See the list below: Sulfa-based therapy is recommended for nocardiosis. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim) or a sulfonamide (sulfadiazine), given intravenously in high doses, is the treatment of choice. [ ] Linezolid has a growing literature in support

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

14. Nocardiosis (Overview)

. [ ] Nocardiosis is an acute, subacute, or chronic suppurative infection caused by Nocardia. It has a pronounced tendency to remission and exacerbation. Infections are localized or disseminated. Localized cutaneous or lymphocutaneous infections usually occur after contamination of an abrasion, resulting in cutaneous or lymphocutaneous abscess. In children with immunocompetence, systemic spread from the primary skin site is extremely rare. Disseminated and fulminant disease mainly occurs in immunocompromised (...) Nocardiosis (Overview) Pediatric Nocardiosis: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTY2OTE5LW92ZXJ2aWV3 processing > Pediatric Nocardiosis Updated: Aug 14, 2018

2014 eMedicine Pediatrics

15. Nocardiosis (Diagnosis)

common underlying risk factors for disseminated nocardiosis. [ , , ] Red nodules on a patient with disseminated nocardiosis. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis Primary cutaneous nocardiosis, most commonly caused by Nocardia brasiliensis , typically affects immunocompetent individuals with a history of trauma and can be subdivided into 3 clinical entities that include (1) lymphocutaneous infection, (2) mycetoma, and (3) superficial skin infection, including ulceration, abscess, and cellulitis. Involvement (...) of the skin can occur as a result of secondary dissemination from systemic infection. Cutaneous involvement with N asteroides is usually secondary to hematogenous dissemination from a pulmonary focus. Dissemination to the skin is estimated to occur in approximately 10% of patients with systemic nocardial infection, second in incidence only to CNS involvement. [ , , , ] Ulcer on the arm of a patient with primary cutaneous nocardiosis. Lymphocutaneous nocardiosis Lymphocutaneous nocardiosis is rare

2014 eMedicine.com

16. Nocardiosis (Diagnosis)

Kurdgelashvili, MD; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD Share Email Print Feedback Close Sections Sections Nocardiosis Overview Background Nocardiosis is an acute, subacute, or chronic infectious disease that occurs in cutaneous, pulmonary, and disseminated forms. manifests as cutaneous infection ( or abscess), lymphocutaneous infection (sporotrichoid nocardiosis), or subcutaneous infection (actinomycetoma). Pleuropulmonary nocardiosis manifests as an acute, subacute, or chronic pneumonitis, usually (...) are typically weakly acid-fast after traditional staining and positive on modified acid-fast staining, but this is not invariable. The cutaneous, lymphocutaneous, and subcutaneous forms of nocardiosis arise from local traumatic inoculation. These infections are not necessarily associated with immunocompromised host states, but dissemination from these sites of inoculation is more likely in immunocompromised hosts, particularly those with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Pleuropulmonary nocardiosis

2014 eMedicine.com

17. Nocardiosis

Nocardiosis Nocardiosis - Infectious Diseases - MSD Manual Professional Edition Brought to you by The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases The trusted provider of medical information since 1899 SEARCH SEARCH MEDICAL TOPICS Common Health Topics Resources QUIZZES & CASES Quizzes Cases / / / / IN THIS TOPIC OTHER TOPICS IN THIS CHAPTER Test your knowledge Smallpox Because of worldwide (...) Loading Topic Resources Nocardiosis is an acute or chronic, often disseminated, suppurative or granulomatous infection caused by various aerobic soil saprophytes of the genus Nocardia . Pneumonia is typical, but skin and CNS infections are common. Diagnosis is by culture and special stains. Treatment is usually with sulfonamides. Nocardia are obligate aerobic, partially acid-fast, beaded, branching, gram-positive bacilli. Several Nocardia sp, in the family Actinomycetaceae, cause human disease. N

2013 Merck Manual (19th Edition)

18. Sporotrichoid Skin Infection Caused by Nocardia brasiliensis in a Kidney Transplant Patient (PubMed)

of Nocardia skin infections in transplant patients could lead to dissemination of disease and other poor outcomes. Nocardia brasiliensis is a rare cause of lymphocutaneous nocardiosis in solid organ transplant patients with only two other cases reported to our knowledge. This case describes a middle-aged man, who presented 16 years post kidney transplant. He developed a sporotrichoid lesion on his upper extremity one week after gardening. Ultrasound showed a 35-cm abscess tract on his forearm, which (...) Sporotrichoid Skin Infection Caused by Nocardia brasiliensis in a Kidney Transplant Patient Prompt and accurate diagnosis of Nocardia skin infections is important in immunocompromised hosts, especially transplant patients. The sporotrichoid form, which is otherwise known as the lymphocutaneous form of Nocardia skin involvement, can mimic other conditions, including those caused by fungi, mycobacteria, spirochetes, parasites and other bacteria. Delayed or inaccurate diagnosis and treatment

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2018 Diseases

19. Lymphocutaneous nocardiosis and cutaneous pheohyphomycosis in a liver transplant recipient. (PubMed)

Lymphocutaneous nocardiosis and cutaneous pheohyphomycosis in a liver transplant recipient. Infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in transplanted patients. The increasing number of immunocompromised patients has not only augmented infections by specific pathogens, but also by opportunistic microbial agents.A mixed cutaneous infection caused by Nocardia brasiliensis and Exophiala jeanselmei is reported in a liver transplant patient.The cutaneous lesions were painful nodules

2008 International Journal of Dermatology

20. Nocardia

Nocardia Nocardia Information. Nocardiosis Professional reference | Patient TOPICS Try our Symptom Checker TREATMENT RESOURCES Try our Symptom Checker PROFESSIONAL Upgrade to Patient Pro / / Search Nocardia Authored by , Reviewed by | Last edited 21 May 2015 | Certified by This article is for Medical Professionals Professional Reference articles are designed for health professionals to use. They are written by UK doctors and based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. You may find (...) one of our more useful. In this article In This Article Nocardia In this article Nocardia is a Gram-positive bacillus which can cause multiple illnesses and also disseminated (or invasive) disease, known as nocardiosis. Nocardia is found in the soil where it degrades organic matter. It is found worldwide and some strains are pathogenic to humans. Nocardia is mostly an opportunistic organism and illness is more severe in the immunocompromised. Nocardia is interesting because it releases virulence

2008 Mentor

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