How to Trip Rapid Review

Step 1: Select articles relevant to your search (remember the system is only optimised for single intervention studies)

Step 2: press

Step 3: review the result, and maybe amend the or if you know better! If we're unsure of the overall sentiment of the trial we will display the conclusion under the article title. We then require you to tell us what the correct sentiment is.

1,327 results for

Long-Acting Reversible Contraception

by
...
Alerts

Export results

Use check boxes to select individual results below

SmartSearch available

Trip's SmartSearch engine has discovered connected searches & results. Click to show

1. Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Specific Issues for Adolescents

/federal-policy-guidance/downloads/ cib040816.pdf ACOG https://www.acog.org/programs/long-acting-reversible- contraception-larc/activities-initiatives PEDIATRICS Volume 146, number 2, August 2020 7 by guest on November 15, 2020 www.aappublications.org/news Downloaded from health care services. 63 The Title X Family Planning Program is unique in that a detailed bill of services is not generated and sent to the parent or guardian. The Title X Family Planning Program improves con?dential care by allowing (...) in?ammatory disease. Obstet Gynecol. 2012;120(6):1314–1321 28. Steiner RJ, Liddon N, Swartzendruber AL, Rasberry CN, Sales JM. Long-acting reversible contraception and condom use among female US high school students: implications for sexually transmitted infection prevention. JAMA Pediatr. 2016;170(5):428–434 29. Biggs MA, Arons A, Turner R, Brindis CD. Same-day LARC insertion attitudes and practices. Contraception. 2013;88(5): 629–635 30. Biggs MA, Harper CC, Brindis CD. California family planning health

2020 American Academy of Pediatrics

2. Contraception - emergency: Scenario: Emergency hormonal contraception

normal. Levonorgestrel does not provide contraceptive cover for the remainder of the menstrual cycle. The woman should therefore consider ongoing contraception or avoid UPSI. Only a barrier method of contraception (such as a condom) can reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infections. Offer verbal and/or written advice about ongoing methods of contraception, including long-acting reversible contraception. If the woman becomes pregnant after taking levonorgestrel emergency contraception, advise her (...) consider ongoing contraception or avoid UPSI. Only a barrier method of contraception (such as a condom) can reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infections. Offer verbal and/or written advice about ongoing methods of contraception, including long-acting reversible contraception. If the woman becomes pregnant after taking ulipristal acetate emergency contraception: Advise that evidence on the outcome of pregnancies exposed to ulipristal acetate is very limited. However, there have been no associated

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

3. Contraception - emergency: Scenario: Emergency contraception

infections. Assess her competency to independently consent to treatment, and document in her case notes that she meets (or does not meet) the . Explain about the efficacy, advantages, and disadvantages of the different types of emergency contraception, including the copper-bearing intrauterine device. Prescribe emergency contraception if she meets the . Inform her about the available methods of ongoing contraception, including long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). Fraser criteria In the UK, people (...) ) clinical guidelines Recommended actions after incorrect use of combined hormonal contraception [ ], Emergency contraception [ ], a guideline produced by the Family Planning Association, Your guide to the contraceptive patch [ ], and the manufacturer's Summary of Product Characteristics for Evra transdermal patch [ ]. What should I consider when choosing a method of emergency contraception? When choosing a method of emergency contraception, consider: The woman's preference — where possible, provide

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

4. Contraception - combined hormonal methods: Scenario: Combined oral contraceptive

use. How to manage and when additional contraception is required. What to do if occurs after taking the pill. Possible of the COC including . The possibility of . Advise the woman to check with a healthcare professional before starting any new drug treatment (including herbal remedies such as St John's wort). Also: Provide written information on the COC — the provides a useful with information for women using the COC. Offer verbal and/or written advice on long-acting reversible contraception (...) knowledge of what to do if a , if she has , or if she requires . Remind the woman about possible . Offer verbal and/or written advice about long-acting reversible contraception (copper intrauterine device, levonorgestrel intrauterine system, progestogen-only injectables, progestogen-only implant, and the combined hormonal vaginal ring). For more information, see the CKS topics on and . Advise the woman to return at any time if she has any other issues or concerns. How long should the combined oral

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

5. Contraception - assessment: Scenario: Assessment for specific contraceptive methods

and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) clinical guidelines Progestogen-only implants [ ], Quick start contraception [ ] , the UK Medical Eligibility Criteria for contraceptive use [ ] and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance Long-acting reversible contraception [ ]. Progestogen-only injectables These recommendations are based on the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) clinical guideline Progestogen-only injectable [ ], the UK Medical Eligibility Criteria (...) for contraceptive use [ ], and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance Long-acting reversible contraception [ ]. How should I assess a woman's suitability for combined hormonal contraception (CHC)? In addition to a general assessment to decide on a suitable method of contraception, the following specific assessment is advised for women considering combined hormonal contraception (CHC). Check the UK Medical Eligibility Criteria CHC is contraindicated due to unacceptable health risks

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

6. An interactive website to aid young women's choice of contraception: feasibility and efficacy RCT Full Text available with Trip Pro

{{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} The 'Contraception Choices' website was popular with young women but was not associated with increased use of long-acting reversible contraception or satisfaction with contraceptive method at 6 months. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , & . Judith Stephenson 1, * , Julia V Bailey 2 , Ann Blandford 3 , Nataliya Brima 4 , Andrew Copas 4 , Preethy D’Souza 5 , Anasztazia Gubijev 1 , Rachael Hunter 6 , Jill Shawe 7 (...) An interactive website to aid young women's choice of contraception: feasibility and efficacy RCT An interactive website to aid young women's choice of contraception: feasibility and efficacy RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue

2020 NIHR HTA programme

7. Immediate postpartum long-acting reversible contraception for women at high risk for medical complications Full Text available with Trip Pro

Immediate postpartum long-acting reversible contraception for women at high risk for medical complications SocietyforMaternal-FetalMedicine(SMFM) ConsultSeries#48:Immediatepostpartum long-actingreversiblecontraceptionforwomen athighriskformedicalcomplications Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM); Laura K. Vricella, MD; Lori M. Gawron, MD, MPH; Judette M. Louis, MD, MPH The Society of Family Planning (SFP) endorses this document. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (...) Organization Title Yearof publication American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee Opinion No. 670: Immediate Postpartum Long-Acting Reversible Contraception 2016 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use 2016 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Practice Bulletin No. 186: Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices. 2017 Society of Family Planning Society of Family Planning Guidelines

2019 Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

8. Society of Family Planning clinical recommendations: contraception after surgical abortion Full Text available with Trip Pro

-Ma C. et al. Impact of a theory-based video on initiation of long-acting reversible contraception after abortion. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2015; 212 ( [Evidence Grade: I] ) : 310.31-7 ] resulted in no difference in contraceptive uptake or method choice. A systematic review of periabortion counseling models showed no effect on subsequent unintended pregnancy, although the sample size of studies was small and heterogeneous [ Stewart H. McCall S.J. McPherson C. Towers L.C. Lloyd B. Fletcher J. et al (...) reversible contraceptive methods. Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2014; 46 ( [Evidence Grade: III] ) : 171-175 , Moniz M.H. Spector-Bagdady K. Heisler Michele Harris L.H. Inpatient postpartum long-acting reversible contraception. Obstet Gyncol. 2017; 130 ( [Evidence Grade: III] ) : 783-787 ]. 2 Which short-acting reversible contraceptive methods can be initiated after surgical abortion? Any short-acting contraceptive method may be started immediately after first- or second-trimester surgical abortion (GRADE

2020 Society of Family Planning

9. Covid-19: Society of Family Planning interim clinical recommendations: Contraceptive provision when healthcare access is restricted due to pandemic response

. Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, 2016. MMWR Recomm Rep 2016;65. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.rr6504a1. [9] National Family Planning & Reproductive Health Association. NFPRHA Resource: Self- Administration of Injectable Contraception 2020. https://www.nationalfamilyplanning.org/file/documents---service-delivery-tools/NFPRHA--- Depo-SQ-Resource-guide---FINAL-FOR-DISTRIBUTION.pdf (accessed April 21, 2020). [10] SisterSong, National Women’s Health Network. Long-Acting Reversible (...) Covid-19: Society of Family Planning interim clinical recommendations: Contraceptive provision when healthcare access is restricted due to pandemic response Society of Family Planning interim clinical recommendations: Contraceptive provision when healthcare access is restricted due to pandemic response Lyndsey S. Benson, MD, MS a ; Tessa Madden, MD, MPH b ; Jessica Tarleton, MD, MPH c ; Elizabeth A. Micks, MD, MPH a a University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA b Washington University in St

2020 Society of Family Planning

10. Interventions using social networking sites to promote contraception in women of reproductive age. Full Text available with Trip Pro

studies were conducted in the USA and were at high risk of bias. One RCT included 2284 women exposed to a web-based SNS or nothing. The groups were no different post intervention in their self-reported consistency of contraceptive use or knowledge of the relative effectiveness of different methods. There was a small but significant increase in the use of more effective methods (long-acting reversible methods) at 12 months' follow-up.The second study, a cluster RCT with 1578 women, used a closed (...) Interventions using social networking sites to promote contraception in women of reproductive age. Social networking sites (SNSs) have great potential as a platform for public health interventions to address the unmet need for contraception.To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions using SNSs to promote the uptake of and adherence to contraception in reproductive-age women.We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and six other databases on January 2018. We also searched Google Scholar, key

2019 Cochrane

11. Adolescents and Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices

Adolescents and Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices e130 VOL. 131, NO. 5, MAY 2018 OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Adolescents and Long-Acting Reversible Contraception: Implants and Intrauterine Devices ABSTRACT: The phenomenon of adolescent childbearing is complex and far reaching, affecting not only the adolescents but also their children and their community. The prevalence and public health effect of adolescent pregnancy reflect complex structural social problems (...) and an unmet need for acceptable and effective contra- ceptive methods in this population. In 2006–2010, 82% of adolescents at risk of unintended pregnancy were currently using contraception, but only 59% used a highly effective method, including any hormonal method or intrauterine device. Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) have higher efficacy, higher continuation rates, and higher satisfaction rates compared with short-acting contraceptives among adolescents who choose to use them

2018 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

12. Contraception - IUS/IUD

Contraception - IUS/IUD Contraception - IUS/IUD | Topics A to Z | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Contraception - IUS/IUD Contraception - IUS/IUD Last revised in May 2019 Intrauterine contraceptives (IUCs) are long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) which have a licensed duration of use of 3–10 years Management Background information Contraception - IUS/IUD: Summary Intrauterine contraceptives (IUCs) are long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) which have a licensed duration of use of 3 (...) will conceive within the first year of use. The primary mode of action of the Cu-IUD is via the toxic effects of copper on the ovum and sperm, preventing fertilization. The copper also has an effect on cervical mucus which may inhibit sperm penetration, and inflammatory reactions within the endometrium may prevent implantation. Risks and adverse effects of IUCs include: Unscheduled bleeding. Perforation of the uterine wall at the time of insertion or later. Ectopic pregnancy. The Family Planning Association

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

13. Contraception - IUS/IUD: Scenario: Copper intrauterine device

. A pregnancy test is performed no sooner than 3 weeks since the last episode of unprotected sexual intercourse (UPSI) and is negative. Basis for recommendation Types of IUD This information is based on the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) guideline Intrauterine contraception [ ] and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline Long-acting reversible contraception [ ]. Mechanism of action This information is based on the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive (...) These recommendations are based on the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) clinical guideline Intrauterine contraception [ ], and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline Long-acting reversible contraception [ ]. Pregnancy This recommendation is based is based on good clinical practice. Unable to feel the threads These recommendations are based on the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) clinical guideline Intrauterine contraception [ ]. Threads may

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

14. Contraception - barrier methods and spermicides

and written information should be provided on the types of barrier methods, their mode of action, their advantages and disadvantages, possible adverse effects, and how to use them correctly. Advice should be offered on the efficacy of barrier methods. Advice should be offered about other methods of contraception and their comparative efficacy, including long-acting reversible contraceptives. The Family Planning Association provides useful leaflets on the barrier methods of contraception. © . (...) Contraception - barrier methods and spermicides Contraception - barrier methods and spermicides | Topics A to Z | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Contraception - barrier methods and spermicides Contraception - barrier methods and spermicides Last revised in April 2016 Barrier methods of contraception include:Male and female condoms.Diaphragms and caps.Spermicides. Management Background information Contraception - barrier methods and spermicides: Summary Barrier methods of contraception include

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

15. Contraception - barrier methods and spermicides: Scenario: Male and female condoms

on and The efficacy at preventing unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. See the section on Compare the failure rate relative to other methods such as long-acting reversible contraception. See the section on in the CKS topic on . The correct use of male and female condoms. See the sections on and What to do if the condom slips off or breaks. The person would need to consider the chances of: Infection and the possible need for post-exposure prophylaxis against HIV infection. See the in the CKS (...) ) clinical guideline Barrier methods for contraception and STI prevention [ ], the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Of Canada (SOGC) guideline Canadian contraception consensus. Part 2 [ ], and the Family Planning Association Handbook of sexual health in primary care [ ]. How effective are male and female condoms at preventing unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections? For comparison of the efficacy of male and female condoms with other methods of contraception, see the section

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

16. Contraception - combined hormonal methods: Scenario: Combined transdermal patch

. How to manage . The possibility of . Advise the woman to check with a healthcare professional before starting any new drug treatment (including herbal remedies such as St John's wort). Also: Provide written information on the CTP — the provides a useful with information for users of the patch. Offer verbal and/or written advice about long-acting reversible contraception (copper intrauterine device, levonorgestrel intrauterine system, progestogen-only injectables, progestogen-only implant (...) about possible . Offer verbal and/or written advice about long-acting reversible contraception (copper intrauterine device, levonorgestrel intrauterine system, progestogen-only injectables, progestogen-only implant, and the combined hormonal vaginal ring). Advise the woman that she should return at any time if she has any problems. How long should the combined transdermal patch be used for? Stop the combined transdermal patch at 50 years of age, and switch to one of the following contraceptive

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

17. Contraception - assessment: Scenario: Issues to discuss and consider

is at risk of an STI or HIV (including during pregnancy and postpartum), recommend correct and consistent use of condoms, either alone or with another method of contraception. For more information, see the section on . For more information on barrier methods of contraception, see the CKS topic on . Provide verbal and/or written advice about alternative methods of contraception, in particular, long-acting reversible contraception (copper intrauterine device, levonorgestrel intrauterine system, progestogen (...) ) guidance Long-acting reversible contraception [ ] and the Department of Health (DH) Reference guide to consent for examination or treatment [ ]. © .

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

18. Contraception - assessment

should take into account the woman's preferences and her: Requirements for contraception, including future plans for having children, and the attitudes of her partner and her family towards contraception. Personal beliefs and views about contraception. Understanding of her preferred method, its efficacy, risks and adverse effects, advantages and disadvantages, and how to use it. Advice should be offered on long-acting reversible contraception (copper intrauterine device, levonorgestrel intrauterine (...) conditions or medication that could affect her choice of contraceptive method. The UK Medical Eligibility Criteria (UKMEC) should be checked to ensure that the preferred method is not contraindicated. If the woman is considering sterilization, or natural family planning, the World Health Organization Medical Eligibility Criteria should be checked, as these methods are not covered by the UKMEC. Factors which should be considered when deciding upon a method of contraception include: Comorbidities and other

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

19. Contraception - sterilization: Scenario: Vasectomy

semen analysis. People may regret having had the procedure: The assessment process is designed to ensure that people at risk for regret are identified and fully informed about alternative long-acting reversible contraceptive methods. Vasectomy cannot easily be reversed, and the NHS does not routinely offer reversal procedures. Vasectomy does not protect against sexually transmitted infections. Rarely, the procedure fails after clearance has been given that there are no spermatozoa in the ejaculate (...) minority of men, non-motile sperm persist after vasectomy. In such cases, 'special clearance' to stop contraception may be given when fewer than 100,000 non-motile sperm/mL are found in a fresh specimen examined at least 7 months after vasectomy. Reassure the man that vasectomy: Does not increase the risk of impotence, testicular cancer or heart disease. Has been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, but this link is unlikely to be causal. Provide appropriate . The Family Planning

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

20. Contraception - sterilization

methods of contraception and their comparative efficacy, such as long-acting reversible contraception. In addition, the partner's suitability for sterilization should be assessed, as the couple's clinical history, present symptoms, and/or examination findings may influence which partner goes forward to have sterilization. A person considering sterilization should be advised that: Vasectomy has a lifetime failure rate of about 1 pregnancy per 2000 men. Tubal occlusion has a lifetime failure rate (...) of about 1 in 200 women. If a Filshie clip is used (the most common method used in the UK) the failure rate 10 years after the procedure may be lower (1 in 333–500 women). The NHS rarely provides reversal operations. The Family Planning Association provides useful leaflets on sterilization. © .

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

To help you find the content you need quickly, you can filter your results via the categories on the right-hand side >>>>