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Long Thoracic Nerve Injury

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1. Long Thoracic Nerve Injury

Long Thoracic Nerve Injury Long Thoracic Nerve Injury Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Long Thoracic Nerve Injury Long (...) Thoracic Nerve Injury Aka: Long Thoracic Nerve Injury From Related Chapters II. Causes Direct blow to Chronic repetitive overhead traction (e.g. tennis, swimming, baseball) III. Symptoms Diffuse or with overhead activity IV. Signs Forward flexion weakness at r winging V. Management Prevents and contractures Strengthen remaining stabilizing muscles Trapezius Muscles Rhomboid Muscles Levator Muscle Surgery is rarely indicated VI. Diagnostics and EMG Not typically indicated but may show supraspinatus

2018 FP Notebook

2. Intercostal Nerve to Long Thoracic Nerve Transfer for the Treatment of Winged Scapula: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study (PubMed)

Intercostal Nerve to Long Thoracic Nerve Transfer for the Treatment of Winged Scapula: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study There are very few surgical options available for treating a patient with winged scapula caused by a long thoracic nerve (LTN) injury. Therefore, we devised a novel technique based on a cadaveric dissection whereby regional intercostal nerves (ICN) were harvested and transposed to the adjacent LTN in 10 embalmed cadavers (20 sides). The LTN was identified along the lateral border (...) , might offer a new technique for restoring protraction following an LTN injury.

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2017 Cureus

3. Meta-Analysis of Long Thoracic Nerve Decompression and Neurolysis Versus Muscle and Tendon Transfer Operative Treatments of Winging Scapula. (PubMed)

Meta-Analysis of Long Thoracic Nerve Decompression and Neurolysis Versus Muscle and Tendon Transfer Operative Treatments of Winging Scapula. Injury to long thoracic and the spinal accessory nerves can cause winging scapula as a result of weakness and paralysis of the trapezius and serratus anterior muscles. Although these nerve and muscle operations have been reported to correct winging scapula due to various causes, there is no report on comparing the outcomes of these procedures in peer (...) -reviewed Pubmed-indexed literature. In this article, we compared the improvements in the restoration of shoulder functions in winging scapula patients after long thoracic nerve decompression (LTND) in our present study with outcomes of muscle and tendon transfer operations published in the literature (Aetna cited articles).Twenty-five winging scapula patients met the inclusion criteria, who had LTND and neurolysis at our clinic since 2008. Electromyographic evaluation of the brachial plexus and long

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2017 Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open

4. Risk of Encountering Dorsal Scapular and Long Thoracic Nerves during Ultrasound-guided Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block with Nerve Stimulator (PubMed)

Risk of Encountering Dorsal Scapular and Long Thoracic Nerves during Ultrasound-guided Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block with Nerve Stimulator Recently, ultrasound has been commonly used. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) by posterior approach is more commonly used because anterior approach has been reported to have the risk of phrenic nerve injury. However, posterior approach also has the risk of causing nerve injury because there are risks of encountering dorsal (...) scapular nerve (DSN) and long thoracic nerve (LTN). Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of encountering DSN and LTN during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach.A total of 70 patients who were scheduled for shoulder surgery were enrolled in this study. After deciding insertion site with ultrasound, awake ultrasound-guided IBPB with nerve stimulator by posterior approach was performed. Incidence of muscle twitches (rhomboids, levator scapulae, and serratus anterior muscles

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2016 The Korean journal of pain

5. Study of Probable Benefit of the Neuro-Spinal Scaffoldâ„¢ in Subjects With Complete Thoracic AIS A Spinal Cord Injury as Compared to Standard of Care

Study of Probable Benefit of the Neuro-Spinal Scaffoldâ„¢ in Subjects With Complete Thoracic AIS A Spinal Cord Injury as Compared to Standard of Care Study of Probable Benefit of the Neuro-Spinal Scaffold™ in Subjects With Complete Thoracic AIS A Spinal Cord Injury as Compared to Standard of Care - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved (...) Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Study of Probable Benefit of the Neuro-Spinal Scaffold™ in Subjects With Complete Thoracic AIS A Spinal Cord Injury as Compared to Standard of Care (INSPIRE2) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government

2018 Clinical Trials

6. Robot-assisted surgery in thoracic and visceral indications

Robot-assisted surgery in thoracic and visceral indications Dec2015 © EUnetHTA, 2015. Reproduction is authorised provided EUnetHTA is explicitly acknowledged 1 EUnetHTA Joint Action 3 WP4 Version 1.4, 06.05.2019 This report is part of the project/joint action ‘724130/EUnetHTA JA3’ which has received funding from the European Union’s Health Programme (2014-2020) Rapid assessment of other technologies using the HTA Core Model ® for Rapid Relative Effectiveness Assessment ROBOT-ASSISTED SURGERY (...) IN THORACIC AND VISCERAL INDICATIONS Project ID: OTCA14 Robot-assisted surgery for thoracic and visceral surgery Version 1.4, 06.05.2019 EUnetHTA Joint Action 3 WP4 2 DOCUMENT HISTORY AND CONTRIBUTORS Version Date Description V1.0 31.01.19 First draft. V1.1 27.02.19 Input from co-author has been processed. V1.2 29.03.19 Input from dedicated reviewers has been processed. V1.3 30.04.19 Input from external experts and manufacturer(s) has been processed. V1.4 06.05.19 Input from medical editing has been

2019 EUnetHTA

7. Epidural Decompression Surgery Within 24 Hours After Acute Spinal Cord Injury Improves Spinal Nerve Function

Epidural Decompression Surgery Within 24 Hours After Acute Spinal Cord Injury Improves Spinal Nerve Function Epidural Decompression Surgery Within 24 Hours After Acute Spinal Cord Injury Improves Spinal Nerve Function - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov Hide glossary Glossary Study record managers: refer to the if submitting registration or results information. Search for terms x × Study Record Detail Saved Studies Save this study Warning You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (...) (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Epidural Decompression Surgery Within 24 Hours After Acute Spinal Cord Injury Improves Spinal Nerve Function The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

2017 Clinical Trials

8. Assessment of cranial nerve mononeuropathy

. It is not commonly injured, but due to its long, superficial extracranial course, it is susceptible to iatrogenic injury. Nerve testing The accessory nerve can be assessed by testing the strength of trapezius and SCM muscles. Trapezius weakness results in a drooping shoulder at rest and mild scapular winging with attempted shoulder elevation and arm abduction >90°. When the patient shrugs his or her shoulders against resistance, unilateral weakness may be detected. SCM weakness results in difficulty when turning (...) . The strength of the pterygoid muscles may be tested by asking the patient to open the jaw against resistance. The corneal reflex can be tested with cotton wool (afferent-trigeminal, efferent-facial) and elicits an ipsilateral and contralateral blink response in normal individuals. Facial (VII) Anatomy The facial nerve is composed of both motor and sensory roots (nervus intermedius) and has a long intracranial course with 3 bends and multiple branches. The motor root has neuronal cell bodies in the facial

2018 BMJ Best Practice

9. Long Thoracic Nerve Injury

Long Thoracic Nerve Injury Long Thoracic Nerve Injury Toggle navigation Brain Head & Neck Chest Endocrine Abdomen Musculoskeletal Skin Infectious Disease Hematology & Oncology Cohorts Diagnostics Emergency Findings Procedures Prevention & Management Pharmacy Resuscitation Trauma Emergency Procedures Ultrasound Cardiovascular Emergencies Lung Emergencies Infectious Disease Pediatrics Neurologic Emergencies Skin Exposure Miscellaneous Abuse Cancer Administration 4 Long Thoracic Nerve Injury Long (...) Thoracic Nerve Injury Aka: Long Thoracic Nerve Injury From Related Chapters II. Causes Direct blow to Chronic repetitive overhead traction (e.g. tennis, swimming, baseball) III. Symptoms Diffuse or with overhead activity IV. Signs Forward flexion weakness at r winging V. Management Prevents and contractures Strengthen remaining stabilizing muscles Trapezius Muscles Rhomboid Muscles Levator Muscle Surgery is rarely indicated VI. Diagnostics and EMG Not typically indicated but may show supraspinatus

2015 FP Notebook

10. CRACKCast 107 – Peripheral Nerve Disorders

Asymmetrical proximal and distal peripheral neuropathies: Brachial plexopathy Open Direct plexus injury (knife or gunshot wound) Neurovascular (plexus ischemia) Iatrogenic (central line insertion) Closed Traction injuries “Stingers” Traction neurapraxia Partial or complete nerve root avulsion Radiation Neoplastic Idiopathic brachial plexitis Thoracic outlet Lumbosacral plexopathies Open Closed Traction injuries Pelvic double vertical shearing fracture Posterior hip dislocation Retroperitoneal hemorrhage (...) = Central Nervous System + Peripheral Nervous System PNS divided into 12 cranial nerves (Remember episode 105?) 31 spinal nerves (8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 coccygeal). Almost all of these nerves have Sensory, Motor and autonomic function Anatomically / functionally speaking the autonomic nervous system is divided into: Sympathetic (thoracolumbar) component Parasympathetic (craniosacral) component. Note: Autonomic dysfunction may cause systemic abnormalities (e.g., Orthostasis

2017 CandiEM

11. The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome among long-term manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury: A cross-sectional study (PubMed)

The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome among long-term manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury: A cross-sectional study Use of a handrim wheelchair could force the wrist into extreme excursions and encroachment of the median nerve.We performed a study of the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome in prolonged wheelchair users.A cross-sectional study was conducted for one year in an outpatient clinic of spinal cord injury.Patients had traumatic injury at the first thoracic level (...) and below, with time since injury of at least 5 years.The prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome by history taking, clinical examinations and motor and sensory nerve conduction studies of median nerve performed for both hands.Participants (N = 297) were all male. Mean (SD) age and duration since injury were 48 (8.5) and 23 (6.6) years, respectively. A significant difference in median duration of injury based on the severity of the syndrome (P < 0.001), and a significant trend in time since injury

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2016 The journal of spinal cord medicine

12. Attempt of peripheral nerve reconstruction during lung cancer surgery (PubMed)

underwent direct anastomosis, while the remaining two underwent phrenic nerve replacing tension-relieving anastomosis.All patients were able to speak immediately after recovery. No or minimal glottal gap was observed during laryngoscopy conducted on the second day after surgery. Most patients achieved full recovery of voice quality.Immediate reconstruction of RLN is technically feasible and can be carried out with satisfying short-term and long-term outcomes.© 2018 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published (...) Attempt of peripheral nerve reconstruction during lung cancer surgery Vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury are not rare complications of lung cancer surgery and can cause lethal consequences. Until now, no optimal method other than paying greater attention during surgery has been available.Four patients underwent lung surgery that involved RLN or vagus nerve injury. The left RLN or vagus nerve was cut off and then reconstructed immediately during surgery. Two patients

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2018 Thoracic cancer

13. The Effectiveness of ThOracic Epidural and Paravertebral Blockade In Reducing Chronic Post- Thoracotomy Pain: 2

to tissue, muscle and nerve damage from the incision, and as the wound heals. The normal breathing motion and nerve injury caused during surgery can result in a high risk of persistent pain for months after surgery. Chronic post-thoracotomy pain (CPTP) is defined as pain that recurs or persists at least two months following the surgery and can occur in up to half of these patients. There are two commonly used for pain control during thoracotomy: Thoracic Epidural Block (TEB) blocks nerves on both sides (...) of the chest at the spinal cord. It reduces painful nerve signals but may not abolish them completely. Para Vertebral Blockade is done only on the side of surgery and may completely block painful nerve signals from reaching the spinal cord. This total blockade of nerve signals could decrease the likelihood of developing chronic pain and could be uniquely effective in preventing long-term pain. Over a period of 30 months this trial will be attempting to approach all patients undergoing a thoracotomy

2018 Clinical Trials

14. Transaxillary decompression of thoracic outlet syndrome patients presenting with cervical ribs. (PubMed)

were classified according to the Society for Vascular Surgery reporting standards: 25 class 1, 17 class 2, 5 class 3, and 23 class 4. Presentations included neurogenic TOS in 49 patients and arterial TOS in 7. Operative time averaged 141 minutes, blood loss was 47 mL, and hospital stay averaged 2 days. No injuries to the brachial plexus, long thoracic, or thoracodorsal nerves were identified. One patient had partial phrenic nerve dysfunction that resolved. No hematomas, lymph leak, or early (...) Transaxillary decompression of thoracic outlet syndrome patients presenting with cervical ribs. The transaxillary approach to thoracic outlet decompression in the presence of cervical ribs offers the advantage of less manipulation of the brachial plexus and associated nerves. This may result in reduced incidence of perioperative complications, such as nerve injuries. Our objective was to report contemporary data for a series of patients with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) and cervical ribs

2018 Journal of Vascular Surgery

15. Outcomes of carotid-subclavian bypass performed in the setting of thoracic endovascular aortic repair. (PubMed)

Outcomes of carotid-subclavian bypass performed in the setting of thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Subclavian artery revascularization is frequently performed in the setting of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). However, there is little information on the short- and long-term outcomes of patients undergoing carotid to subclavian artery bypass in this clinical setting. As such, this study sought to define the early and late outcomes associated with this procedure.Patients (...) undergoing carotid-subclavian bypass in conjunction with TEVAR between June 2005 and September 2016 were retrospectively identified from a prospectively maintained, single-center aortic surgery database. The 30-day outcomes specific to the carotid-subclavian bypass procedure were analyzed, including cervical plexus nerve injury, bleeding complications, and local vascular complications. All preoperative and postoperative chest radiographs were carefully analyzed to assess for hemidiaphragm elevation

2018 Journal of Vascular Surgery

16. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Long-Term Management of Kawasaki Disease: A Scientific Statement for Health Professionals From the American Heart Association

Diagnosis, Treatment, and Long-Term Management of Kawasaki Disease: A Scientific Statement for Health Professionals From the American Heart Association Diagnosis, Treatment, and Long-Term Management of Kawasaki Disease: A Scientific Statement for Health Professionals From the American Heart Association | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 (...) February 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access article Diagnosis, Treatment, and Long-Term Management of Kawasaki Disease: A Scientific Statement for Health Professionals From the American Heart Association , MD, MPH, FAHA, Chair , MD , MD, MPH, FAHA , MD , MD, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MSN, RN, CPNP , MD , MD, FAHA , MD , MD, PhD , MD, PhD , and MD, FAHA MD, FAHA, Co-ChairOn behalf of the American Heart Association Rheumatic

2017 American Heart Association

17. Thoracic Disc Injuries (Treatment)

symptoms are acceptable. Medical Issues/Complications Activity modification to minimize the patient's symptoms is important. Proper posture can help to prevent further disc injury. If oral drug usage fails to alleviate the patient's symptoms, consider steroid injection for intercostal nerve blocks. An orthosis (ie, brace) is initially acceptable for pain control but causes deconditioning over time. Thus, long-term bracing should be avoided. Surgical Intervention Surgical decompression is indicated (...) Thoracic Disc Injuries (Treatment) Thoracic Disc Injuries Treatment & Management: Acute Phase, Recovery Phase, Maintenance Phase Edition: No Results No Results Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly9lbWVkaWNpbmUubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2FydGljbGUvOTYxNjgtdHJlYXRtZW50 processing

2014 eMedicine.com

18. Vagal Nerve Blockade for Obesity: VBLOC Therapy Using the Maestro RC2 Device

to bring about sustained and clinically significant weight loss in patients for whom drug therapy or bariatric surgery are not indicated, or who do not want to undergo bariatric procedures that are invasive, irreversible, and bring a higher risk of short- and long-term adverse events. The Maestro RC2 device, a vagal nerve blocker positioned laparoscopically, could satisfy the need for such an alternative approach to inducing weight loss in obese patients. Compared with evidence concerning available (...) for telemetry and recharging, a rechargeable lithium ion battery with an estimated eight-year life, and an external battery-powered controller. 2-7 The device is typically implanted during a 60- to 90-minute laparoscopic procedure. The electrodes are placed on the dissected anterior and posterior vagus nerve trunks to block both afferent and efferent signalling. 2-5,11 The neuroregulator is placed in a subcutaneous pocket within the thoracic sidewall. A link between the internal and external components

2015 CADTH - Issues in Emerging Health Technologies

19. Vagal Nerve Blockade for Obesity: VBLOC Therapy Using the Maestro RC2 Device

to bring about sustained and clinically significant weight loss in patients for whom drug therapy or bariatric surgery are not indicated, or who do not want to undergo bariatric procedures that are invasive, irreversible, and bring a higher risk of short- and long-term adverse events. The Maestro RC2 device, a vagal nerve blocker positioned laparoscopically, could satisfy the need for such an alternative approach to inducing weight loss in obese patients. Compared with evidence concerning available (...) for telemetry and recharging, a rechargeable lithium ion battery with an estimated eight-year life, and an external battery-powered controller. 2-7 The device is typically implanted during a 60- to 90-minute laparoscopic procedure. The electrodes are placed on the dissected anterior and posterior vagus nerve trunks to block both afferent and efferent signalling. 2-5,11 The neuroregulator is placed in a subcutaneous pocket within the thoracic sidewall. A link between the internal and external components

2015 CADTH - Issues in Emerging Health Technologies

20. Nerve Injuries in Aesthetic Breast Surgery: Systematic Review and Treatment Options. (PubMed)

after breast augmentation or mastopexy. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were established before the search was performed.The initial 4806 citations were narrowed by topic, title, and abstract to 53 articles. After full-text review, 36 studies were included. The risk of any nerve injury after breast augmentation ranged from 13.57% to 15.44%. Specific nerve injury rates were calculated for the intercostal cutaneous nerves, branches to the nipple-areola complex, intercostobrachial nerve, long (...) thoracic nerve, and brachial plexus. Also calculated were the total estimated risks of chronic pain, hyperesthesia, hypoesthesia, and numbness. The meta-analysis showed no associations between the rates of breast nerve injury or sensation change and implant size, incision type, or implant position in patients who underwent breast augmentation. The data were insufficient to determine rates of nerve injury in mastopexy.The possibility of nerve injury, sensation change, or chronic pain with breast

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2014 Aesthetic surgery journal / the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic surgery

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